WHEN MASSIVE VOLCANOS EXPLODE.

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Bear Paw Jack

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Is Seattle next when Mount Rainier pops??

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dY_3ggKg0Bc

There are a few volcanoes that when they go, life on earth will change forever, and a few others that could change human existence in ways we can't imagine.
 

tinman

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Never gave much thought to this kinda stuff........until my oldest got a job with Boeing......in Seattle. :shock:
 

toysoldier

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Hutchinson, KS USA
Something I learned in Geology 101:

Mt. Ranier and Mt. Shasta are called "shield volcanos" because they were built up of layers of lava and ash, forming low cones. In the wet northwest, rainwater percolates down through the layers, reaching the hot zone near the magma pool under the volcano. The superheated water degrades the minerals in the volcanic rock, turning it into clay minerals. An earthquake (remember the recent hoopla about an inevitable 9.0 quake in the area?) can cause a section of the volcanic slope to fracture and slide off, as Mt. St. Helens did. This uncorks the magma, and a massive eruption occurs. Pyroclastic flows could take out everything in the area, and I could be shoveling a few inches of ash off my roof in central Kansas.
 
Joined
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Greenville, SC: USA
I was humbled many years ago on the big Island of Hawaii when I saw that massive caldera and read that the floor goes up and down every so often a couple hundred feet... when you realize the power and potential of a volcano you then understand that Nature will always have the upper hand over mankind.

Crazy friend of a friend (and this guy is nuts) made a statement that he knew the reason for all these recent massive earth quakes.... we are sucking all the oil out of the ground and that was the lubricant.... I thought this was just silly.... then I thought on it for a while.........
 

wizofwas

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blume357 said:
I was humbled many years ago on the big Island of Hawaii when I saw that massive caldera and read that the floor goes up and down every so often a couple hundred feet... when you realize the power and potential of a volcano you then understand that Nature will always have the upper hand over mankind.

Crazy friend of a friend (and this guy is nuts) made a statement that he knew the reason for all these recent massive earth quakes.... we are sucking all the oil out of the ground and that was the lubricant.... I thought this was just silly.... then I thought on it for a while.........
I was talking to my friend Al Gore the other day and he told me that the true nature of all of these recent massive earthquakes was caused by "Global Warming". And he would know, because he invented the internet. And as everyone knows, everything you read on the internet is TRUE.
 

gasbag

Blackhawk
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Good grief, terrorism, riots, political upheaval, racism, flooding, meteors, rampant disease, high crime, global warming and now volcanoes.
That does it. I am going to bed and NEVER coming out of the bedroom again.
 

SAJohn

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Terrebonne, Oregon, USA
We think of the earth as a pretty solid ball of rock. Actually, it is mostly a ball of molten metal and rock. If the earth were the size of an apple, the solid top layer would be about the same thickness as the apple skin. The earth's atmosphere would also be about as thick as that apple skin.
 

Bear Paw Jack

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Years ago, a friend and I were headed out for a fishing trip on the Kenai. We had heard about the volcano but didn't really think much about it because when that happened before (not nearly as bad) the prevalent winds were south and there was never an issue. This time was different. Though by proportions it was nothing like the potential of many in todays world the sky turned black and the ash was falling to the extent that it was hard for us to see and we had turned back and were heading home. The ash covered everything, a few inches deep. What a hassle to get under control. I can't imagine a big one. I'm probably between the one in Washington and the one in Yellowstone. Does give me pause.
 

GunnyGene

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gasbag said:
Good grief, terrorism, riots, political upheaval, racism, flooding, meteors, rampant disease, high crime, global warming and now volcanoes.
That does it. I am going to bed and NEVER coming out of the bedroom again.

Be glad that all the natural processes are active. When (not if) the clock runs down for this rock, it will look very similar to Mars. :)
 

Colonialgirl

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Somewhere amongst all my childhood memorabilia, there is a certificate that certifies that I AM a member of the "Hui e Pele" (SP) Society and that I have been down in the caldera of a volcano on the big Island of Hawaii. It's even been "Sealed" by a stamping with a hot lava rock. That was way back in 1947/48 when we spent a week at the Military Rest Camp there. The State Park Hq. where we signed up for the trip to the bottom and got the certificate is LONG GONE, buried by molten lava years ago along with the road leading up to it. We also walked through a lava tube where the outer crust of Lava had hardened and cooled and the molten inner core had flowed on toward the sea years before. You guys can have Mt St Helens and the rest of the hot spots.
NOTE: Please tell them to slow down the Volcanoes under the sea; they are boiling the water, sending moisture up into the air which is NOW falling down on me here in Florida !!
PS: When the coming ICE AGE arrives, I'll rent space in my backyard CHEAP for all you Forum members up North.
 

GunnyGene

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Active volcano near Japanese Nuke plant. How great is that? :roll:

TOKYO (Reuters) - Japan warned on Saturday that a volcano 50 km (31 miles) from a just-restarted nuclear reactor is showing signs of increased activity, and said nearby residents should prepare to evacuate.

Sakurajima, a mountain on the southern island of Kyushu, is one of Japan's most active volcanoes and erupts almost constantly. But a larger than usual eruption could be in the offing, an official at the Japan Meteorological Agency said.

"There is the danger that stones could rain down on areas near the mountain's base, so we are warning residents of those areas to be ready to evacuate if needed," the official added.

The agency also said it had raised the warning level on the peak, 990 km southwest of Tokyo, to an unprecedented 4, for prepare to evacuate, from 3. Roughly 100 people could be affected.

Japan on Tuesday restarted a reactor at the Sendai nuclear plant, some 50 km from Sakurajima. It is the first reactor to be restarted under new safety standards put in place after the 2011 Fukushima disaster.

Critics have long pointed out that the plant is also located near five giant calderas, crater-like depressions formed by past eruptions, with the closest one some 40 km away.

Still, the Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) has said the chance of major volcanic activity during the lifespan of the Sendai plant is negligible.

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/japan-raises-warning-level-volcano-not-far-nuclear-023920871.html

Famous last words. :roll:
 

Rocdoc

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toysoldier said:
Something I learned in Geology 101:

Mt. Ranier and Mt. Shasta are called "strato volcanoes" because they were built up of layers of lava and ash, forming low cones. In the wet northwest, rainwater percolates down through the layers, reaching the hot zone near the magma pool under the volcano. The superheated water degrades the minerals in the volcanic rock, turning it into clay minerals. An earthquake (remember the recent hoopla about an inevitable 9.0 quake in the area?) can cause a section of the volcanic slope to fracture and slide off, as Mt. St. Helens did. This uncorks the magma, and a massive eruption occurs. Pyroclastic flows could take out everything in the area, and I could be shoveling a few inches of ash off my roof in central Kansas.

Fixed one point for you toysoldier..........

Shield volcanoes are like those making up the Hawaii chain, broad, low aspect, many times wider than high, made of mafic lavas. Strato volcanoes are the big guys I think most people picture when they think of a volcano, intermediate to felsic compositions. St Helens was a bit odd, in that the slope failure involved an inflating cryptodome on the north flank due to magma intrusion. Scary thing about St Helens is that is involved a very small volume of magma when compared to the biggest eruptions, that involved > 3 orders of magnitude more magma.
 

GunnyGene

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Rocdoc said:
toysoldier said:
Something I learned in Geology 101:

Mt. Ranier and Mt. Shasta are called "strato volcanoes" because they were built up of layers of lava and ash, forming low cones. In the wet northwest, rainwater percolates down through the layers, reaching the hot zone near the magma pool under the volcano. The superheated water degrades the minerals in the volcanic rock, turning it into clay minerals. An earthquake (remember the recent hoopla about an inevitable 9.0 quake in the area?) can cause a section of the volcanic slope to fracture and slide off, as Mt. St. Helens did. This uncorks the magma, and a massive eruption occurs. Pyroclastic flows could take out everything in the area, and I could be shoveling a few inches of ash off my roof in central Kansas.

Fixed one point for you toysoldier..........

Shield volcanoes are like those making up the Hawaii chain, broad, low aspect, many times wider than high, made of mafic lavas. Strato volcanoes are the big guys I think most people picture when they think of a volcano, intermediate to felsic compositions. St Helens was a bit odd, in that the slope failure involved an inflating cryptodome on the north flank due to magma intrusion. Scary thing about St Helens is that is involved a very small volume of magma when compared to the biggest eruptions, that involved > 3 orders of magnitude more magma.

And then there's the really big boys: Rift volcano's. Which can extend for thousands of miles along plate boundaries and last for many thousands of years. The Mid-Atlantic Ridge is one such zone.
 
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