Will Ruger Fix This Problem?

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Xrayist

Single-Sixer
Joined
Nov 9, 2007
Messages
263
Location
Fort Collins, CO
As for sending back to Ruger, depending, I guess, on who you talk to, it can be very expensive. About 7 years ago I bought a Bisley in 44 Mag that someone had chopped the barrel to 5.5". Very poor job, crooked front sight, bad crown. I called Ruger to see about getting an original 7.5" barrel put on it. They quoted me just over 300 for the work plus shipping both ways. I think back then it came to about 410 including shipping. I bought a new take off barrel for 50 on a forum, paid my local gunsmith 85 to swap barrels. He adjusted to a very tight cylinder gap, and it shoots great. Ruger said at the time, that part of the cost is that they would have to reblue the entire gun, as barrels are in the white and they make sure bluing matches over entire pistol. Don't know how it shoots, but if it shoots fine, I would not worry about it. Just my opinion.
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
183
Location
TEXAS
I fired the revolver quite a bit over the weekend (See Post #15) and my crappy bench shooting technique aside, it's shooting very well. The only fly in the ointment is it leads somewhat at the start of the rifling, but it's not terrible, especially with slower burning powders and I can mitigate the problem.
So no, it's not going back to Ruger.
 

CAJUNCHEF

Bearcat
Joined
Mar 24, 2023
Messages
58
Location
Louyisiana
I fired the revolver quite a bit over the weekend (See Post #15) and my crappy bench shooting technique aside, it's shooting very well. The only fly in the ointment is it leads somewhat at the start of the rifling, but it's not terrible, especially with slower burning powders and I can mitigate the problem.
So no, it's not going back to Ruger.
Good results! I checked the forcing cone, and bore of my. Flattop .44 Special, and to my naked (and weak eyes) looked good.

On another note, has anyone tried "brush lapping" as opposed to fire lapping?

John Barsness, writer for Rifle and Handloader described this process years ago, as opposed to Fire Lapping, or making a lead lap to fit the bore (as British gunmakers did a century ago.)

The procedure is to wrap on oversized phosphor bronze brush (use a .45 brush for a .44 bore) tightly wrapped with an oversized cotton patch.
Coat with a lapping compound, run in through for 100-200 strokes, then clean the bore.
He learned this process from a respected gunsmith that did a lot of rifle barreling.

If this works, based upon those here that may have tried this, I will try it on my .44 Special Flattop, to really minimize leading and copper fouling.
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
183
Location
TEXAS
Good results! I checked the forcing cone, and bore of my. Flattop .44 Special, and to my naked (and weak eyes) looked good.

On another note, has anyone tried "brush lapping" as opposed to fire lapping?

John Barsness, writer for Rifle and Handloader described this process years ago, as opposed to Fire Lapping, or making a lead lap to fit the bore (as British gunmakers did a century ago.)

The procedure is to wrap on oversized phosphor bronze brush (use a .45 brush for a .44 bore) tightly wrapped with an oversized cotton patch.
Coat with a lapping compound, run in through for 100-200 strokes, then clean the bore.
He learned this process from a respected gunsmith that did a lot of rifle barreling.

If this works, based upon those here that may have tried this, I will try it on my .44 Special Flattop, to really minimize leading and copper fouling.
I have always enjoyed John Barsness's writings. I remember reading about brush-lapping. If memory serves that method is used for smoothing tooling marks out of barrels. I don't know if it would remove a constriction from a revolver barrel.
 
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