Single Six Hunter sights - what's your opinion?

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Do you like Single Six Hunter sights?

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Jayhawkhuntclub

Buckeye
Joined
Aug 28, 2007
Messages
1,110
Location
Kansas
Personally, I absolutely love them. So much that I replace the sights on my 5.5" single six with a v notch rear blade and a modified front bead.
I prefer the precision that is allowed by the smaller front bead, as apposed to a big blockly front sight that's bigger than any bullseye. They are much more accurate, IMO.

I am surprised to hear over the years that some people don't like them. If you don't like them: why? I respect everyone's individual preference on this, but I'd like to know why.
 

nhlever

Bearcat
Joined
Nov 18, 2008
Messages
33
Since the sights for the MKIII pistols also work on the Single Six, I just ordered the v notch rear, and the firesight front that is on the MKIII hunters. I'm looking forward to giving that combo a try.
 

JHRosier

Single-Sixer
Joined
Nov 14, 2004
Messages
116
Location
New England, USA
M'BOGO":1r3r4o4v said:
I've never seen them up close. ...

Nor have I, and I own one !
That itsy bitsy front bead has got to go.
I'm looking into getting custom sights made for mine with a 1/8" wide blade that I can see and a nice square notch to line it up.
The factory sights are like a BB rolling around in a saucer.

Ruger makes guns with easily interchangeable front sights but offers absolutely no alternative sizes or styles. That is just plain silly.

Jack
 

NRA_guy

Bearcat
Joined
Dec 3, 2008
Messages
6
I recently bought a New Model Hunter Single Six.

I have serious trouble seeing the front sight and I'm not crazy about the rear sight either.

So I bought a set of FireSights that were listed as fitting the Single Six.

To my amazement, the front FireSight does not fit the Hunter. (The rear did but I took it back off.)

I tried a red dot and a 2 x Weaver pistol scope, but they looked out of place.

Not sure where I will go.
 

Bucks Owin

Hunter
Joined
Mar 22, 2004
Messages
3,190
Location
51st state of Jefferson
Yep, that's the first thing one notices when you pick up a .22 Hunter and I kinda like them. However, I don't think I'd want them on a barrel any shorter than the Hunter's 7.5" and a 9.5" would work even better for that sight. Remember, the Hunter is a supposed to be a "hunting sixgun", not a bullseye shooter. Right?....JMO :wink:
 

Jayhawkhuntclub

Buckeye
Joined
Aug 28, 2007
Messages
1,110
Location
Kansas
kentdep":3mbepy7s said:
I have shoot too much Bullseye to appreciate the Hunter's sights. But I have no quams about others likeing them.

Jay

I don't really know what "Bullseye" shooting is, but how does a big blocky sight help with that?
 

Uncle Howie

Buckeye
Joined
May 28, 2004
Messages
1,191
Location
MN
Jayhawkhuntclub":1ys5u8tz said:
kentdep":1ys5u8tz said:
I have shoot too much Bullseye to appreciate the Hunter's sights. But I have no quams about others likeing them.

Jay

I don't really know what "Bullseye" shooting is, but how does a big blocky sight help with that?

Bullseye shooting is competetive pistol target shooting- think one-handed Camp Perry style. Also sometimes called "2700," in reference to the number of points attainable in the classic match.

A "big blocky sight" helps when you're shooting a well-defined target (black bullseye) using a "six o'clock hold" sight picture. You align the sights so that the front and rear form a straight line, with equal space on either side of the front post. Move the gun so that the bullseye is sitting tangentially on top of the front post, then let 'er rip! OK, probably "squeeze one off." :D

Great target sights aren't always the best for hunting, plinking, or casual shooting. I've looked at target sights where the front blade nearly filled the rear notch- very little light on either side. Not good for hunting or casual plinking, but very precise.

The beauty of using a six o'clock hold sight picture is that it's very precise and repeatable. You aren't covering the target with your sight, you're holding your sight directly underneath the bottom edge of the bull.

In other words- if your sights were set up for formal Bullseye competition, and you went plinking at small targets, you'd have to estimate elevation or have a lot of misses.

I've seen some 25 and 50-yard targets shot with both .38 revolvers and .45 1911s that I couldn't replicate while shooting a rifle offhand. Bullseye shooters competing on a high level are pretty impressive!

Edit: all this drivel above can be explained with a couple of diagrams shown here: http://www.bullseyepistol.com/chapter2.htm
 

Axehandle

Buckeye
Joined
Feb 5, 2008
Messages
1,422
Location
North Alabama
Scope them thangs!
001-5.jpg
 

Jayhawkhuntclub

Buckeye
Joined
Aug 28, 2007
Messages
1,110
Location
Kansas
Uncle Howie: Thanks for the explanation. Six oclock hold is how I've shot most of my targets for the last decade or so. So I understand what you are talking about. I still like the little gold bead for shooting targets, but that's just me.
 

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