Ruger Redhawk and super redhawk recoil question

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Sacramento Johnson

Blackhawk
Joined
Jun 1, 2005
Messages
526
Location
Nevada
Hi all,
I know this is going to sound strange, but after reading a long thread on Bear encounters on another wire, I got to wondering about using a DA revolver. (Yes, I know, rifle or shotgun would be better; avoiding them altogether best, but one never knows when travelling in their "icebox".)
I have handled the Ruger SA more than any other platform, but DA does have advantages if one's fingers are strong enough to work the double action trigger. How does the redhawk compare to the super redhawk, say using buffalo bore or corbon high end 45 colt caliber ammo as concerns recoil?
 

k22fan

Blackhawk
Joined
Apr 22, 2010
Messages
713
Out of all brands' DA grips the original rubber with wood side panels GP-100/SRH grip makes heavy the most comfortable for me. On S&W N frames it's the rubber Hogue Mono-Grip but they'd be second in line at best. While this is very subjective it is backed up somewhat by Ruger never chambering the RH for .454 Casul or .480 Ruger. Ruger could could have done that If they'd thought it was a good idea. RH and SRH .44 Magnum cylinders have the same part number so RH cylinders are just as large as SRH cylinders. I'm guessing they limit the recoil of RH revolvers because of the steel back strap.

While RH DA trigger pull usually can be improved SRH DA pull is easier to improve. I've fired too many RH revolvers with professional trigger jobs that would not go off reliably in DA. There's too much temptation to over lighten The RH dual purpose spring.

Of course the nest poster will write the opposite opinion and I'm not willing to settle it with a draw at high noon.
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
21,246
Location
Lake Lure NC USA
I often put forth this information concerning a serious or dangerous encounter with man or beast.

A DA handgun can be operated with one hand easier than any other design. Especially if you are in a struggle, or having to use your "off" hand. You can be fighting a thug, wrestling with a bear,, injured, on the ground, or in an otherwise unusual position. You will NEED the gun to work,, so why not use a DA?
As for recoil,, in a serious situation you will not notice recoil.
 

Sacramento Johnson

Blackhawk
Joined
Jun 1, 2005
Messages
526
Location
Nevada
k22fan; thank you for your insight.

Contender; I suspect you are right if the situation ever arises one won't notice recoil, but if one can't handle the recoil in practice, and so doesn't practice, then one is not going to be effective (and may delay or be afraid to use it) in an emergency situation in my opinion.
 

Rumrunner

Hunter
Joined
Jun 19, 2006
Messages
4,046
Location
Midwest Illinois
The RH weighs one ounce more than the SRH, so not much difference in recoil due to weight. I found that shooting the RH with the backstrap open hurt my hand. With a grip that covers the backstrap them it was more bearable. My current SRH has been cut to 5" and MagNaPorted. I had a 480 SRH also cut down. I have no problem shooting the Rugers. I can shoot them all day.
I've had 3 different Smith 29's, from 4" to 6", and they all hurt. I don't know why but to me they just aren't fun to shoot.
I load for my 44's, using 200, 240, 270, and 300 grain bullets. Most of these are loaded at or near max.
 

Ron IL

Bearcat
Joined
Dec 29, 2016
Messages
85
Location
Southern Illinois
I had a Redhawk 45 colt/45 acp and a Super Redhawk in 454/45 colt. I had the Alaskan in the super. The super shot the 45 colt with ease and a mild recoil and the better trigger group of the GP100. The redhawk has a different trigger group and not nearly as good as the super and the recoil is much more and for me was a knuckle buster. I didn't like shooting it at all. I made up some Montana 300 grain wide nose bullets for bear, etc. The super ran them fine but they were too long to go in the redhawk. They did the 255 gr OK. And the redhawk did not shoot the 45 acp very well. It looked like a shotgun pattern.
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
21,246
Location
Lake Lure NC USA
Sacramento, you are absolutely correct. You must practice to be efficient. And recoil concerns are valid.
We get a LOT of elderly ladies in our classes. And recoil is an issue. We normally suggest that they practice with milder (and cheaper,) ammo, to make sure they can operate & use the firearm. And then occasionally use the full power ammo in practice to make sure they understand what it will feel like if they have to use it.
You mentioned Buffalo Bore or Cor-Bon ammo. Both types are expensive top end stuff. Good stuff too. But will you be shooting 50-100 rounds weekly, monthly, to stay in practice with that stuff? Most people will not. And to be proficient with a firearm, AND familiar with how it will perform, you need to practice regularly. So, we always suggest that regular practice be done with "softer & cheaper" ammo, so that they will have confidence in themselves & the firearm. And again, under stress, the differences won't b e noticed,, especially if they have experienced the heavy stuff occasionally.
All this is background info.
Your main question was the differences in the (2) models.
I own a few Redhawks & Super Redhawks. Both feel quite similar to me in general. I'd give the nod A LITTLE to the Super in taming felt recoil due to it's weight over the Redhawk, if both are the same barrel length. But either one is an excellent choice. I find I shoot my Redhawks more often than the Super's just because they feel better in MY hands. And I shoot a GP-100 10mm MC in competition, so I get a lot of muscle motor memory skill instilled in my brain. As such, I can pick up any other Ruger DA model & feel just fine.
 

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