Single Six Cylinder, what am I looking for, dimensions, ect.

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cgb

Bearcat
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Oct 5, 2008
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I need a Single Six 22lr cylinder for my 3 screw Single Six. Will a new model one work? What am I looking for? Dimensions? What type of fitting does it require? Also, If I get a set of old model lockwork, will it drop in? Or does that need some fitting also?
 

Hondo44

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cgb":gm7h4wjh said:
I need a Single Six 22lr cylinder for my 3 screw Single Six. Will a new model one work? What am I looking for? Dimensions? What type of fitting does it require? Also, If I get a set of old model lockwork, will it drop in? Or does that need some fitting also?

You received all very correct and accurate information from all. Now lets boil it down to a practical matter. In my experience of 43 years:
1. Ruger 22s have a pretty tight tolerance on cylinder manufacturing, that is to say they are all quite close to the same size, especially in the same vintage.
2. the easiest way is to go to a gun show where one can often find them. Take your gun and try any that you find. If you find one that fits in your frame without excessive front to back play or excessive barrel to cylinder gap (over .006"), take you caliper and the dimensions in #3 below with you. The timing will most likely work as good as a new gun out of the box and to your satifaction. Any gun can be improved by fine tuning it for optimum (perfect timing) including new out of the box guns.
Is it required? Not for the average guy.
3. If you find a cylinder on line, it's not such a crap shoot if you do this: use a caliper to get the overall cylinder length of yours including the front bushing length and the ratchets in the back. Then get the cylinder length including the bushing in front but excluding the ratchets in the back. Ask for the same dimensions from the seller of the cylinder for sale. If they are the same as your dimensions or slightly larger (a few thousands of an inch, buy it. If you're at all handy you can hone it to fit. If it won't fit both in the frame and between end of barrel and breach face, according to your measurements, hone the difference off of the ratchet end. If it fits between the breach face and barrel but not in the frame, hone the difference in measurements off of the end of the front bushing. And worse case, you can always take it to a local smith for a few bucks.
4. Lockwork will usually drop in and work. If you have a timing issue it will be one of two things; the hammer will move to the full cock position before the cylinder bolt fully engages the cylinder notch. In that case the 'hand' (technical name; cylinder pawl) is too short. Replace it or try your old one. More likely, the cylinder bolt will fully engage the notch before the hammer is fully cocked. Not uncommon even in new guns. Or you can not cock the hammer at all (the trigger won't engage the full cock notch) before the hammer stops moving. Either way the cure is simple: hone the bottom step only of the hand until it works properly. Just go slow when removing metal. All might sound complicated but quite simple and probably not needed! You'll feel great when you've got that cylinder in and working by yourself.
 

flatgate

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I'll add that reducing the "length" of the cylinder's ratchet can create headspace issues so proceed with caution.

JMHO,

flatgate
 
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Very seldom, if ever ( can't remember when?) we ever took anything "off" the ratchet end ( except to 'polish smooth) as Flatgate says, too iffy in the head space area...this end is usually consistant from cylinder to cylinder........look for burrs, or dings,divets and 'misuse' in the ratchets, clean up accordingly............
 

Hondo44

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rugerguy":3albdy8e said:
Very seldom, if ever ( can't remember when?) we ever took anything "off" the ratchet end ( except to 'polish smooth) as Flatgate says, too iffy in the head space area...this end is usually consistant from cylinder to cylinder........look for burrs, or dings,divets and 'misuse' in the ratchets, clean up accordingly............

All true but in all likelihood, this dimension will not be his problem; it'll be a too long cylinder bushing. Probable worse case scenario is a nice tight bar/cyl gap. Having to touch the ratchet end would be an unusual cylinder fitting situation, since he can't take off the end of the barrel for fear of opening the gap for his other cylinder. If he stays within his dimension tolerances I gave him of a couple thousands when he buys the cylinder, he can't get into trouble.
 

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