Press came yesterday.

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Kyhunt

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 4, 2008
Messages
233
Location
IL
I'm brand new to reloading and my press came yesterday. Its just a simply Lee 50th Ann kit, but I'm happy. :D I still have to order dies and components. I figure it will be several months before I load my first round of ammo. Lots and lots and lots of reading to do. :shock: I want to load 357,38, and 30-30. My wife looked at the Lyman manual and smiled and said she was glad it was me reloading and not her.
 

Pete

Single-Sixer
Joined
Nov 23, 2001
Messages
159
Location
B'ham,AL USA
You will enjoy yourself and the first round you fire that you loaded will be a hoot! You picked three that are very easy to load for ! Have fun! :D
 

Cary

Single-Sixer
Joined
Oct 28, 2005
Messages
113
Location
Boise, ID
Kyhunt,
That kit is a great place to start and should do you you just fine. Heck some guys start with that kit and stay with it. I started with one of the Lee Turret Press Kits and have used it now for ten years. I began with 38/357 and then added 30-30 as well. Two great rounds to start loading with. My latest addition is 45-70. Once you get going you will find reloading a great addition to your shooting hobby.
Cary
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
22,099
Location
Lake Lure NC USA
Welcome to the fun of reloading. I just loaded 1000 rounds of 45 ACP last night. As you mentioned,, it'll take some reading to become a good reloader,,, but it's worth it. The calibers you mentioned can be very easy,, but realize that the 30-30 can be a bit frustrating if the cases aren't uniform.
Since you mentioned "months" before actually loading any ammo I had to wonder why unless it's the $$ issue of getting all the equipment. If that's the case,,, start checking out gun shows etc. Used dies can be had for $15-$20 a set,, and often have a shell holder with them. Also, for the manuels,,, Midway runs sales often on them. In fact,, right now,, there are a few on this months sale flyer. (www.midwayusa.com) Well worth it!
In any event,,, congrats on starting a new hobby,,, and tell your wife it's not as dangerous as it can be unless you are very careless. Just follow the safety rules & it'll be fine!
 

Rick Courtright

Hawkeye
Joined
Mar 10, 2002
Messages
7,897
Location
Redlands CA USA
Kyhunt":1sn0mjqy said:
I figure it will be several months before I load my first round of ammo. Lots and lots and lots of reading to do.

Hi,

Welcome to our "addiction!" Oops, I meant "hobby." :oops:

Reading as much as possible is a good thing. Remember to be critical while doing so in the sense that you're going to be wading thru a lot of data, a lot of suggestions, and a lot of opinions. Watch for similarities between the books to be able to recognize what's worth remembering. And get used to the idea of cross referencing from one book to another: typos and other mistakes sometimes DO get into print. Also, data changes over the years for a variety of reasons, so try to use the most current editions of the books when making your comparisons!

Any chances you have a friend who's already a reloader who'd be willing to act as a mentor? Most reloaders I know are happy to share their experiences and methods--this is one of those "picture worth 1000 words" deals! If you don't know anyone personally, ask around at your favorite range: you may find someone offers beginner classes in your area.

Add a bit of a ramble...

I don't know if your new 50th Anniv. kit has the "older" Challenger press, or the newer "breech lock" version. I have several iron presses, and bought a 50th Anniv. kit a few years ago to "learn" how well the lighter, alloy Lee presses hold up. Mine came w/ the old model. The older one is quite capable of handling all the everyday loading chores, but it IS a light duty tool compared to many, so I've found a couple of things will help to get the maximum life and reliability out of that press. They apply to the heavier ones, too:

Keep it clean and lubricated! I wipe the ram clean and put a droplet of oil on it each time I start a session. I also do the same thing when I'm done depriming before starting other operations: that primer dust is abrasive, and will wear your press quickly if allowed to. Though it's probably more of a problem w/ alloy presses, Joe (J Miller) reports even an "iron" press can be worn badly if oil is added to primer dust to make "lapping compound." So only oil a clean ram! I also add a droplet of oil to each of the pivot points, then wipe down any excess. It doesn't take much oil...

And then, don't force anything! None of the everyday loading tasks take all that much force. Teach yourself to use a smooth, even stroke on the handle, and when you reach the stops, STOP! Folks have broken virtually every kind of press out there, and while a factory defect is always possible, I suspect there's a lot of 800 lb gorilla action going on based on personal observation!

Have fun learning, and be sure to ask all those "stupid questions" before doing anything you don't quite understand!

Rick C
 

Kyhunt

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 4, 2008
Messages
233
Location
IL
Thanks folks. Contender, the reason I said months is the simple fact that I want to have a pretty good understanding before I try the first round. It may not be that long but it will be a little bit. It will take a few weeks just to get the primers if I order them due to the places I called around here dont have any. As I look through the Lyman manual and the manual that came with the kit I see several differant powders and I'm trying to decide what to get. I see that I have several choices and know down the road I may decide on using something else. I have an ideal of what I'm getting just not 100% positive yet.
 

gregs45auto

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 26, 2005
Messages
491
Location
utah
Welcome to the forum. Great idea to read up before jumping into reloading. You hear horror stories......newbie put rifle powder into blender to make smaller size to flow thru powder measure...blown rifle!! Or the mix powders together to get higher velocity!! BOOM! :shock: WE stick to the manuals because they have lab tested the loads so we can shoot safe. best greg :)
 

Divernhunter

Single-Sixer
Joined
Mar 4, 2004
Messages
263
Location
Denair,Ca,USA
Powders: 38/357 light to mid loads= Unique
357 mag (hot) loads= H-110
30-30= IMR3031

There are others such as 2400 for mag 357 loads but these will do you well to start with and possibably forever.

Read and take your time loading. It is not hard but requires attention. You can make it hard and difficult or pretty simple and easy. Then you can get different degrees between. Start with mild loads and work your way to the hotter loads. Then use the mild loads for plinking/practice as they are more enjoyable.
 

chuck

Blackhawk
Joined
Feb 23, 2009
Messages
964
Location
Oregon
One thing extra you NEED fer reloading those 30-30 is a Lee Factory Crimp die run around $12.00, that way you wont have to be so pickie about OCL.
 

WESHOOT2

Hunter
Joined
Mar 19, 2005
Messages
2,124
Location
Duxbury, Vermont, USA
So yesterday afternoon I was pumping away with modest rapidity on my Dillon XL650, making 9x19 for Sunday's Area 7/ Miller-S&W Invitational Reunion match, when something went 'boing' and shot past my head, ever-so-gently brushing my hair.
It was one of the long springs that assists the powder bar to return, so it was under significant tension.

I had my safety glasses on; know what I mean?



All my prescription eyewear is OSHA safety-rated eyewear.
For good reason, ay?
 

Kyhunt

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 4, 2008
Messages
233
Location
IL
Thanks guys. I've thought about reloading for a couple of years but was very intimidated . After spnding time on here and another forum I feel like its soemthing I can do if I pay attention.
 

Retsoff

Bearcat
Joined
Dec 5, 2007
Messages
25
Location
Slidell, LA
Congratulations. Trust me when I tell you that, if I can reload, anyone can do it. I'm not the most mechanically inclined person around. I'm fairly new to reloading and I can tell you that, the first deer (or any animal for that matter) that you harvest with your reload, is a feeling beyond description. I got my brother-in-law interested in reloading and he literally cannot wait to try his reloads during the coming deer season. Just remember to stick religiously to loading manual data and you'll be safe. I've not yet seen the need for demon speed at least for where & for what I hunt. If you can get acceptable accuracy along with near max book velocity, then go for it. Just take your time & don't needlessly push the envelope and you won't go wrong.

One of the other aspects I am learning to really like about reloading is that I can tailor my reloads for the exact purpose I need.

One final comment: I have found (and I'm sure you will too) that the reloading community is comprised of some of the most helpful people you'll ever interact with. I have been helped so much by knowledgeable and more experienced reloaders, even when I knew my question was elementary (otherwise referred to as "dumb"). I have never been belittled or made to feel stupid. The old saying that "the only dumb question is the one you don't ask" definitely applies to this group of folks.

I know you'll enjoy your new addiction (I mean hobby) as much as we all do.
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
22,099
Location
Lake Lure NC USA
Reloading isn't that hard,, as long as you study some,,, and follow the excellent tutorials in the manuels. Safety first,,, and follow the guidelines. Go slow at first to learn,, and know that sooner or later you'll make a few mistakes. Crumpled cases, slightly high primer, overdone crimp, stuck case in a die,,, etc. All of these minor things can be overcome.
Don't hesitate to ask questions here. We'll help.
 

Lost Sheep

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 3, 2008
Messages
407
Location
Anchorage Alaska
I introduced a friend of mine to reloading last year. I suggested starting with a bulky powder and relatively light loads. Bulky means that the charge will pccupy a lot of space, making an overloaded case obvious to they eye. Relatively light loads will be easy to shoot and even if overloaded a little will not be overpressure.

I looked over the manuals and picked Trail Boss. (Recommended only for lead bullets, but it has done very well for practce loads in his 500 S&W)

I have been fond of Unique for decades.

In your library, I recommend having a copy of "The ABC's of Reloading". It is short on load data, but is very descriptive and fairly easy to read. It might even convince your wife that reloading is easy (so don't let her read it; better she think you are a genius, eh?).

Welcome to reloading. Alwasy wear eye protection, especially when working with primers. Have a drop cloth under your work area in case you spill powder or drop a primer. and read this thread.if you haven't already

http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=13543

Lost Sheep

And don't pinch your fingers in your press
 

Lost Sheep

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 3, 2008
Messages
407
Location
Anchorage Alaska
If no one mentioned it before, definitely get Tungsten-Carbide dies. Tool steel dies require lubrication. For straight-walled cases T-C dies do not require lube, which saves steps and time.

Lee dies come with shell holders. Other brands, you buy the holder separately. Only a little money but convenient.

Lost Sheep
 

Kyhunt

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 4, 2008
Messages
233
Location
IL
I bought that ABCS of reloading. Just started reading it this week. Havent gotten too far in it yet but it is a interesting book. I think I would enjoy reading it even if I wasnt going to reload.
 
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