Help identify this tree we took down please?

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Tallbald

Buckeye
Joined
Jan 29, 2009
Messages
1,750
Location
Southern KY
Last several days the weather has been good for pressing outdoor work. Specifically, there were three trees too close to our modest home that had to come down.
Got a quote of almost $600 ( :shock: ) from one local outfit and the two others never returned my call asking for a quote. Friends, I DON'T chase anyone or any company to give them my business. And sure cannot afford $600.We did it ourselves with family help. Thankfully, my son at 6 feet 6 inches and 345 pounds was available this weekend and offered his help!
We like backyard fires and I like wood turning. I cannot find anyone that can tell me what species this tree is. I thought maybe folks here could help out. I don't know whether to keep this wood for fires and crafting or have the city haul it away (free).
I've asked other wood workers locally, and gone to google trying to find the species but there are a bazillion photos to examine:

Tree was about 35 to 40 feet tall. Likely a volunteer that got out of hand, or was an ornamental.
Huge amount of seed pods that filled our gutter.
Leaves are thick feeling.
We are in south central Kentucky.
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coach

Hunter
Joined
Aug 28, 2007
Messages
3,512
Location
Jacksonville, Maryland
Looks like a magnolia
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=magnolia+tree+seed+pods&id=E660CBCCBDC1C0FD58AA7B8B503E536B45C4C888&FORM=EQNAMI&PC=APPL
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=magnolia+tree+seed+pods&id=F25CCB4F56B537D224FEC403952677BB575FECEE&FORM=EQNAMI&PC=APPL
It burns okay by the way.
 

Tallbald

Buckeye
Joined
Jan 29, 2009
Messages
1,750
Location
Southern KY
It does look like a magnolia. But the leaves are only 4 inches long or so. And not as thick and waxy. , And the leaves drop off come fall unlike the magnolia. Also it doesn't have the dinner plate sized blooms of the magnolia. Hmm. It's puzzler. Thanks. Don
 

eveled

Hunter
Joined
Apr 3, 2012
Messages
4,428
Likely a dwarf magnolia or some other sub species. Knowing what family it is from will give you the answers you seek. To burn, or carve, or haul away.

Just a quick google search shows dozens of varieties of magnolia, some evergreen some deciduous. Meaning some drop their leaves in the fall some don’t.

Technically a hard wood it is good to burn, but softer than most hardwoods it burns quick with bad coaling properties. Stringy and hard to carve.
 

Tallbald

Buckeye
Joined
Jan 29, 2009
Messages
1,750
Location
Southern KY
Thanks again my friends. Might be worth trying. I did not know there were several subspecies of magnolia! Don
 

coach

Hunter
Joined
Aug 28, 2007
Messages
3,512
Location
Jacksonville, Maryland
Many varieties and sizes. Some deciduous, some not. The one in my yard looses its leaves and they aren’t thick and waxy. Ours blooms early spring with big pink flowers.
 

wheelgun1958

Blackhawk
Joined
Aug 1, 2009
Messages
959
Location
Flo, TX
Sweetbay magnolia?

https://www.piedmontmastergardeners.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Sweetbay-Magnolia-Fruit-300x225.jpg
 

Achigan

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 16, 2017
Messages
243
If it splits easy, burn it. About the only unsuitable wood here is cottonwood.
 

Tallbald

Buckeye
Joined
Jan 29, 2009
Messages
1,750
Location
Southern KY
Say. Thank you each and all for your time in helping me. This weekend has been quite busy with outside work that only the unusual low heat and humidity have allowed. We have had week-long rain spells that kept outdoor activities difficult quite a period of time too. My beloved adult son was available this weekend, and even chain sawing and dragging limbs can be "quality time" when I'm with family.
I'll split several sections of the trunk and try turning while still wet. The most close looking one is indeed the magnolia variant. As many times in the past, I've learned new things from other forum members. I will give the ag extension office a sample and see what they say too. They are only a few miles away.
Thanks again friends! Don
 
Joined
Oct 26, 2006
Messages
9,534
Location
Woodbury, Tn
Magnolia is my first thought. My woods has some small non flowering magnolia. Those leaves and the seed pods are definitely a magnolia. Good luck, let us know what the Ag agent says.
gramps
 

RSIno1

Hunter
Joined
Sep 17, 2013
Messages
2,485
Location
Southern California
A friend who built houses worked for a landscaper when building slowed down. He did all the planting $ sod laying. I was working with him one day when a new homeowner kept asking what's this tree. He finally gave up and said "wood". The guy went in the house and didn't bother us again.
 

Tallbald

Buckeye
Joined
Jan 29, 2009
Messages
1,750
Location
Southern KY
I've been known to reply to '"What's this kind of tree?", "Hmmm... I believe it's a green one with batk..". Best reply from anyone I've asked here in town is a magnolia variant. I'll try next few weeks to reach an ag agent, and share anything I can learn. Don
 

powder smoke

Hawkeye
Joined
Aug 16, 2005
Messages
7,429
Location
Milo Maine
If it was in the north country I'd say an American Beech did it have nuts. Smooth gray Bark and the shape and color of the leaf makes me think American Beech, got them deep green glossy leaves. Thing is I do not know if Kentucky has beech. ps
 

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