Guns from a fire question

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collectormzornes

Blackhawk
Joined
Oct 25, 2007
Messages
735
I have a friend who just recently had a house fire and lost everything. He had multiple firearms that didn't survive the fire so to speak. My question is would any firearm that has been through a fire be okay to shoot if put back together or is the metal to fragile since it had been through the fire. He has multiple different firearms and is a current law enforcement agent who has to carry a weapon on a daily basis. He had several hand guns that I thought I might be able to salvage some if possible for him. Thanks for any help
 
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
10,453
Location
missouri
I'm going to say NO WAY. But that might depend on just how badly the damage is. The 11/2/22 fire here was hot enough to melt everything not steel on the 10-22 and AR 15. The only part I would consider re-using is the SS muzzle brake off the AR. It's a non-stressed part.
 

Seminole Wind

Bearcat
Joined
Nov 22, 2010
Messages
64
I have three Ruger revolvers that were in a house fire, but were rebuilt by a quality gunsmith and are great guns now. I think it depends on how much exposure to heat they had. None of the wood grips were burned, just slightly damaged. The guns finishes were damaged more by water than fire. The gunsmith tested the metal on each gun before he agreed to rebuild them. The Bisley in the photo is not one of the three in the house fire.
 

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KRuger

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 12, 2003
Messages
102
Location
Dryside,WA,USA
A friend of mine has 2 .22LR single sixes that went through a house fire. Wooden grips were burnt off; but aluminum grip frames were not damaged. Both revolvers went to a gunsmith for checking and cleaning. Both are in his shooting arsenal today.
KR
 

collectormzornes

Blackhawk
Joined
Oct 25, 2007
Messages
735
Thanks everyone they are supposed to send me some pics of them soon. He had a bunch of Glocks being in law enforcement and said they got melted but I told him I would try and help if I could if the slides and barrels are good enough it will just depend how bad they are when I get a chance to look at them. Thanks again
 

Paul B

Hunter
Joined
Dec 4, 1999
Messages
2,213
Location
Tucson, AZ
It is my understanding that if the wood on a firearm that was in a fire was even slightly charred, then the gun was toast. Plastic on handguns I have no clue. Plastic does melt at high temps but at what temp or how hot I just don't know. At what temp does a polymer plastic gun frame become liquid? It would have to be in a semi-liquid state to work in a high pressure injection mold machine. It's been way too many years since I worked at a place that did that sort of work.
Paul B.
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2002
Messages
9,105
Location
Ohio , U.S.A.
when we had our shops from the mid 70s til the mid 90s we did many guns for insurance co.s, and most all came out excellent, yes need to be inspected, evaluated, on an individual basis,,,whether in fires or out of a river, stolen ones ,recovered some time later.............one I was most proud of and was NOT an insurance job was our late friend from here on the Ruger forum, Dan Meigs, lost a 3 digit Ruger in an apartment fire, and I redid that for him ,personally.........it was burnt to a crips, melted the hard rubber ( plastic) off the frame.........
here are two pictures he took after the fire , put a new grip frame, trigger& hammer and hard rubber grips on it, then I redid it and sent it back ,he put the stags on it,,May he rest in Peace..... ;) (y)
 

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dstegjas

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Messages
229
Location
Ohio
I agree with those above that said the amount of heat is the issue. My parents had a house fire many years ago. The guns were in a gun cabinet with a glass door in the basement. The flames never touched the firearms or anything else in the basement. However the heat was hot enough to cause rust when the fire department poured water into the house to put the fire out. The guns were refinished, tested and all was well. However the key is to have a good gunsmith evaluate them. No one wants to have a gun explode in their hand or face.
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2002
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9,105
Location
Ohio , U.S.A.
ah yes, the water left in the basement after the fire, the fire department does not lose the foundation, but time and water does its job..........;):cool:;)
 

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TINCANBANDIT is back

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 2, 2023
Messages
154
Location
Arizona's Redneck Riviera
modern gun steel is stronger than people think and doesn't need heat treating to make it tough, so exposure to heat may not affect its strength at all.
If the aluminum didn't melt, the springs are intact then the heat is not enough to do anything but damage finish.
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2002
Messages
9,105
Location
Ohio , U.S.A.
,,,,and burn off plastic grips ,melt them, char wood, melt front sight inserts, etc.....as noted above, a close, inspection,,,,,now leave a plastic gun in the rear deck of an auto in the sunshine,in say Arizona?? how long before any given model of todays "plastic" guns would survive the afternoon???:unsure: We;ve had Remingtons put away wet ,after a days hunting, in a vinyl gun case, left overnight and the customer will bring them in,,,,rusted......:cool::rolleyes:
 

BarkeyVA

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 27, 2016
Messages
132
Location
Williamsburg, Va
Glock pistols are made of a specially formulated Nylon 6 polymer. Type 6 Nylon melts at about 410 degrees F. According to Glock, their reinforced nylon 6 is serviceable to 200 C. (392 F)
 

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