RugerForum.com

This is a Ruger Firearms enthusiast's forum, but it is in no way affiliated with, nor does it represent Sturm Ruger & Company Inc. of Southport, CT.
It is currently Wed Apr 23, 2014 9:44 pm

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 28 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 5:56 am 
Offline
Bearcat

Joined: Sat Jun 20, 2009 6:47 am
Posts: 51
Location: Perth, Western Australia
I'm a reloading newbie, and I stupidly allowed myself to be talked into starting with a progressive press. I would now advise other newbies against it, unless they can buy a press that doesn't screw things up like the Lee Pro 1000 does...

(Thinking of ditching it and getting a single-stage press. Would appreciate some advice on what kind of powder measure and other accessories to get with one.)

Anyway, I am trying to load some .38 special rounds for cowboy action shooting. The press was set up for me by an experienced reloader. It seems to work OK, except that every so often it either doesn't prime the cartridge or seats the primer high. It's really getting on my wick. Yes, I am moving the lever through its full range of motion, and usually I can feel the primer getting pushed in (except when it doesn't prime at all, for some reason).

Is there anything I can do about this, or is the Lee Pro 1000 just a piece of junk that I should get rid of?

_________________
Dave
Western Australia


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 7:35 am 
Offline
Blackhawk

Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2004 2:01 am
Posts: 940
I kept my new Lee 1000 for a week then sent it down the road
and ordered my first Dillon. It was the right thing to do.

You can’t go wrong starting with a single stage….I’d suggest one
of the RCBS starter kits, comes with everything you need.

Dennis.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 9:18 am 
Offline
Blackhawk
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2003 1:01 am
Posts: 917
Location: Greybull, WY USA
I started my reloading on a Lee Pro 1000 also. Did not take long to discovery the priming system is a joke. High primers, no primers, upside down primers, side ways primers. I removed the priming system and went to the Lee hand primers. Sure its an extra step but it allows me to inspect each case before inserting a primer.
The 1000 is now in a box in the garage only because I got a steal on a new Loadmaster with several caliber changes. First thing I did was remove the primer system before I ever used it.

Dana


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 10:06 am 
Offline
Single-Sixer
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 21, 2009 7:16 pm
Posts: 124
Location: Oregon
I have heard so many bad things about Lee presses that I would never touch one on a bet. My Dillon 550 and RCBS single stage does everything I could ever want.

_________________
"Firearms stand next in importance to the Constitution itself. They are the people's liberty teeth.... The very atmosphere of firearms everywhere restrains evil interference. When firearms go, all goes, we need them every hour."
George Washington


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 12:49 pm 
Offline
Hunter
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 1:01 am
Posts: 3331
Location: Weatherford TX
If someone already knows a lot and has a lot of experience loading on a progressive, along with a good deal of mechanical aptitude, a Lee 1000 can be made to work right. It's just not nearly as easy as the other presses.

Even with my Dillon Square Deal, I prefer to prime with a Lee hand primer. For one thing, it lets me sit on the couch and watch TV with the fiancee while I do it. Plus, I like to size, deprime, tumble, and prime all of my brass, throw it in some big zip top bags from Grainger's, then I can load it up quick and easy when I need to.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 1:00 pm 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 18, 2002 2:01 am
Posts: 5220
Location: Oregon, USA
Tenbore wrote:
I have heard so many bad things about Lee presses that I would never touch one on a bet. My Dillon 550 and RCBS single stage does everything I could ever want.

I use one of the little Lee Classic Turret presses and it is considerably faster than my RCBS single stage. All that time spent setting up the dies for each step adds up. With mine I just buy an extra turret ring for each caliber I load, and they're ready to be swapped right in.

That said, the priming system on mine is the weak link, too. Cheap plasticy, inconsistent thing. I often use my RCBS hand primer, too. OTOH, I like the Lee Auto Disk powder measure quite a bit.

I just can't get past Dillon's prices. Not just the initial investment, but the cost of dies and other accessories.

-- Sam

_________________
I hear banjos. Paddle faster!
Sarchasm - (n.) The gulf that exists between the creator of subtle witticisms and those who don't get them.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 2:27 pm 
Offline
Single-Sixer
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 21, 2009 7:16 pm
Posts: 124
Location: Oregon
When I bought my Dillon a number of years ago, it was not cheap, but not out of line either. The cost to covert to other calibers was not too bad.

Now though I think the cost of caliber conversion has risen faster than the cost of the basic press.

_________________
"Firearms stand next in importance to the Constitution itself. They are the people's liberty teeth.... The very atmosphere of firearms everywhere restrains evil interference. When firearms go, all goes, we need them every hour."
George Washington


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 5:26 pm 
Offline
Bearcat

Joined: Sat Jun 20, 2009 6:47 am
Posts: 51
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Thanks very much for those comments fellas.

Can you describe how you operate a Lee Pro 1000 without the priming stage? How do you feed the primed cases into the press when the first die they are going to see is the de-priming one? Do you have to remove that die? How do you de-prime the cases?

I can just tell that this is going to be a pain in the behind. I'm not looking forward to explaining to my wife why I need to buy another press and all the stuff that goes with it....

_________________
Dave
Western Australia


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 5:53 pm 
Offline
Single-Sixer

Joined: Sun Apr 02, 2006 2:01 am
Posts: 190
Location: Indianapolis, IN USA
The key to using the Lee 1000 is to keep the primer feed full. Once the primer level gets down to one or two below the round reservoir, put more in. It relies on the weight of the primer to make it feed. I have loaded many thousands of round using the Lee 1000. No. it's not the best design or the most reliable. Yes, it has some plastic parts that can wear. But, it costs about 1/5 of a Dillon and I can change calibers at a minimal cost. To me, it is worth it and it has produced a lot of reliable ammo. If I were loading 10000 rounds a year for competition. it might be a different story, but the Lee will load ammo as good as any if the operator takes a bit of time to figure it out and pays attention (important anyway) during the reloading process.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 7:48 pm 
Offline
Hunter
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 1:01 am
Posts: 3331
Location: Weatherford TX
AussieShooter wrote:
Thanks very much for those comments fellas.

Can you describe how you operate a Lee Pro 1000 without the priming stage? How do you feed the primed cases into the press when the first die they are going to see is the de-priming one? Do you have to remove that die? How do you de-prime the cases?

I can just tell that this is going to be a pain in the behind. I'm not looking forward to explaining to my wife why I need to buy another press and all the stuff that goes with it....


If you're using Lee dies (which I'm assuming you are) just remove the de-priming pin. It will run it through and size it again, but that's no big deal. Alternatively, you could remove the whole sizing/depriming die, and run it as a two station press. That's how Lee ships them for rifle calibers, I believe.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 8:48 pm 
Online
Hunter

Joined: Mon Nov 18, 2002 2:01 am
Posts: 3440
Location: San Francisco Ca USA
What sailorbob sez is just exactly right. The weight of the primers drives the feed. Same as on my late, unlamented Loadmaster.

I finally went around the bend and bought a Dillon 550 about five years ago. The thing is a joy to own, the company is superb to deal with, and you can use it as a single stage press if you want.

It was expensive, but I think I got more than what I paid for.

Okay, so maybe I've been drinking a little blue Kool-Aid,

Jeff


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2009 1:54 am 
Offline
Bearcat

Joined: Sat Jun 20, 2009 6:47 am
Posts: 51
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Now I can't get the useless piece of crap to index properly: when I put a case in and pull the lever it doesn't line up with the de-priming pin. I am going to sell this piece of rubbish.

_________________
Dave
Western Australia


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2009 7:59 am 
Offline
Hawkeye
User avatar

Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2005 1:01 am
Posts: 13078
Location: PA
Like I've ALWAYS said ... Lee products are junk ... sell it ... give it away ... throw it away ... you'll be better off without it. If you want a progressive press to work properly, but a Dillon or Hornady ... problems solved.

REV


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2009 10:18 am 
Offline
Single-Sixer

Joined: Fri Apr 10, 2009 4:12 pm
Posts: 380
Location: Savannah, Georgia
I don't think the Lee Pro 1000 is junk! I have loaded many, many thousands of 38s,357s,44s and 45s with mine. The equipment is the best value in the reloading industry. I'm sure the high dollar spread works smoother or better or something, but why spend the money when what your trying to do is shoot more for less.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2009 1:41 pm 
Offline
Single-Sixer

Joined: Sat Aug 12, 2006 1:01 am
Posts: 198
I've had some problems with the Lee 1000.
Yes, they can get quirks.
Have done umpteen thousands of rounds,mostly 44 mag with it.
The instruction manual has all (pretty much all anyway) info.
WHEN IN DOUBT,READ THE INSTRUCTION MANUAL.
They can get out-of-time.There is a screw under the head to re-time it.
With the priming,I don't use that.Same with the powder measure dispenser.
Primarily use it for case prep:44 mag and 45 Colt/454 Casull.
Use the Lee carbide dies.
Feed tubes and case collator are a big help.
Bullet seating and crimping are done with the RCBS "RS" single stage press.
My Dillon "Square Deal B" is in the box.Set up for 45 Colt.
Think I should have bought the Dillon 550.
You have a good week.

[/b]


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 28 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Clark and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group