Is the SS frame different between .22 & .32

Help Support Ruger Forum:

Hondo44

Hawkeye
Joined
Apr 3, 2009
Messages
8,075
Location
People's Republik of California
Yes I have been asked. Those conversions have all been done by well known Ruger smiths. I'll post photos next time I'm home of single six/Bearcat .38/.357s.

They're not difficult to do but require machining and making custom cylinders. The set up for machining, making jigs, etc., requires a lot of time. So making conversions like that are too time consuming to just do one or two guns. I have to leave that to the professional smiths who will do several of those and can charge enough to be reimbursed for their initial time investment. I only build guns for friends and not charge them except for parts.

So I stick to parts changing, barrel/cylinder swaps and sometimes require only small modifications or micro welding to adapt Ruger parts to old models, etc., like Bisley triggers. Things gunsmiths don't or won't do.

Jim
 

Star43

Buckeye
Joined
Aug 7, 2023
Messages
1,176
Location
California
Jim, Your friends are truly lucky to you as a friend. To do things like that and just charge them for the parts.....not many guys are like that. Again, I wish I was your next door neighbor. Thanks for replying. Have a good one. Steve
 

Hondo44

Hawkeye
Joined
Apr 3, 2009
Messages
8,075
Location
People's Republik of California
357 mag 5 shot Super Single six: http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=41&t=159489

1708972454455.png

1708973923878.png

1708973959670.png
 

Hondo44

Hawkeye
Joined
Apr 3, 2009
Messages
8,075
Location
People's Republik of California
I like the 357 super SS the most and it took the most machining. It could have fit 6 rounds but they had to make it a 5 shot for strength. The cylinder notches are the weak link being located in the center of the chambers. An uneven number of chambers locates the cylinder notches between the chambers. That's why the super SS 327 mag is a 7 shot.
 

Star43

Buckeye
Joined
Aug 7, 2023
Messages
1,176
Location
California
I like the 357 super SS the most and it took the most machining. It could have fit 6 rounds but they had to make it a 5 shot for strength. The cylinder notches are the weak link being located in the center of the chambers. An uneven number of chambers locates the cylinder notches between the chambers. That's why the super SS 327 mag is a 7 shot.
Yes, I liked all of them, but I agree if I had to pick and have just one, that would be the one. And, yes, it always usually is the hardest one to do !! Thanks for sharing those pictures !! 🙂
 

Hondo44

Hawkeye
Joined
Apr 3, 2009
Messages
8,075
Location
People's Republik of California
I like the 357 super SS the most and it took the most machining. It could have fit 6 rounds but they had to make it a 5 shot for strength. The cylinder notches are the weak link being located in the center of the chambers. An uneven number of chambers locates the cylinder notches between the chambers. That's why the super SS 327 mag is a 7 shot.

The 32 single six and single seven center fire frames have certainly simplified conversions to other cartridges on the small frame.
 
Last edited:

Star43

Buckeye
Joined
Aug 7, 2023
Messages
1,176
Location
California
I like the 357 super SS the most and it took the most machining. It could have fit 6 rounds but they had to make it a 5 shot for strength. The cylinder notches are the weak link being located in the center of the chambers. An uneven number of chambers locates the cylinder notches between the chambers. That's why the super SS 327 mag is a 7 shot.

The 32 single six and since seven center fire frames have certainly simplified conversions to other cartridges on the small frame.
When you mention a 5 round cylinder for strength, it makes me think of a gun I bought new in box years ago, and I never fired it. It is a nickel finished model 833 H&R 32 revolver. They were made near the end of the original H&R days. I grew up in Mass. and always had a soft spot for H&R. (I love my model 950. It is the Only one I have ever seen with the 2 separate wood grips). The 950 was from around 94.) Anyway, The 833 was made around '93. It is a solid all steel gun. A good friend of mine, now since retired and out of state sold it to me back then out of his gun shop. I used to ask him if I could shoot the 32 mag out of it, and he said it would probably work but not to try it. The cylinder on the 833 is a 6 shot. When H&R came out with their 32 mag gun a few years later (NEF) it was the SAME gun, but in 5 shots. To me the 833 is a more solid gun. I guess the cylinder makes the difference ?? I still think it would work, but anyway, that gun is still NIB.
 

Star43

Buckeye
Joined
Aug 7, 2023
Messages
1,176
Location
California
When you mention a 5 round cylinder for strength, it makes me think of a gun I bought new in box years ago, and I never fired it. It is a nickel finished model 833 H&R 32 revolver. They were made near the end of the original H&R days. I grew up in Mass. and always had a soft spot for H&R. (I love my model 950. It is the Only one I have ever seen with the 2 separate wood grips). The 950 was from around 94.) Anyway, The 833 was made around '93. It is a solid all steel gun. A good friend of mine, now since retired and out of state sold it to me back then out of his gun shop. I used to ask him if I could shoot the 32 mag out of it, and he said it would probably work but not to try it. The cylinder on the 833 is a 6 shot. When H&R came out with their 32 mag gun a few years later (NEF) it was the SAME gun, but in 5 shots. To me the 833 is a more solid gun. I guess the cylinder makes the difference ?? I still think it would work, but anyway, that gun is still NIB.
Typo error above. The model 833 was made in '83 and the 950 was made a year later in 84. The original H&R, in good old Gardner. Mass. ended production in '86.
 
Top