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kingarthur

Bearcat
Joined
Dec 27, 2007
Messages
62
Hey guys,

I've been searching the reload threads but can't seem to find one with a list of thing to start with.

I am beginner but would like a simple, fair priced loader. Looking to reload 357 and 9mm.

Can someone point me in the direction of what I might need, and what to look for because I might look for a used one.
 

two bit okie

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 27, 2004
Messages
220
Location
Topock, AZ
first of all, get loading manuals from at least 4 of the powder and bullet companies. second, call around and find out if any shops in your area have classes. or will at least allow you to watch while they load their own in the shop when it is slow.

when it comes to equipment get a starter kit from one of the big makers.
Most will have the press, dies, scales all of the stuff you will need.

load a couple of hundred rounds, then go goodie shopping. for the little stuff.

My own list

RCBS starter kit
powder measure, preferably electronic
primer pocket cleaner,
hand primer tools, Mine is the RCBS, I broke 3 of the lee's
case tumble and required expendables. I need to get another one.
new plastic boxes to put your reloads in, the paper that new ones come in will not last long.
 

kingarthur

Bearcat
Joined
Dec 27, 2007
Messages
62
two bit okie":2ildawvj said:
first of all, get loading manuals from at least 4 of the powder and bullet companies. second, call around and find out if any shops in your area have classes. or will at least allow you to watch while they load their own in the shop when it is slow.

when it comes to equipment get a starter kit from one of the big makers.
Most will have the press, dies, scales all of the stuff you will need.

load a couple of hundred rounds, then go goodie shopping. for the little stuff.

My own list

RCBS starter kit
powder measure, preferably electronic
primer pocket cleaner,
hand primer tools, Mine is the RCBS, I broke 3 of the lee's
case tumble and required expendables. I need to get another one.
new plastic boxes to put your reloads in, the paper that new ones come in will not last long.

Thank you for the list. I have started a search for the RCBS starter kit first.


CDFingers
PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2010 10:59 am Post subject:
check this thread:

http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=13543

Also, the members here are very well schooled in reloading, and you'll find helpful advice.

Take your time to enjoy this engaging aspect of the shooting sports.

CDFingers

Thank you for the link...I viewed the video on reloading and I gotta say it seems intense but I'll try it.
 

Snake45

Hawkeye
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
6,982
Location
+4020
CDFingers":55ks2d4p said:
At first, you'll decap and size, then you'll tumble them.

CDFingers
Ouch! It's been so long since I've actually reloaded anything that I honestly can't remember if I did my tumbling before or after decapping/resizing.

I THINK I tumbled after, because:

1. If you tumble after, you'll have to manually inspect every single case to make sure there's no tumbler medium in the primer pocket or flash hole. I don't recall doing this before loading the brass up in the progressive feeder (although I DID give the .45ACP a look for dented case mouths that had to be ironed out before further processing).

2. Why run dirty cases into your resizing die when you can resize nice bright shiny ones?
 

Yosemite Sam

Hunter
Joined
Mar 18, 2002
Messages
2,113
Location
Cape Cod, MA, USA
While safety is definitely #1, I think telling someone they need to go out and buy four books on the subject before they start is a bit overboard. And I have never heard of "reloading classes", at least in my area. This isn't meant to pick on two bit okie's post, just trying to interject a little reality to the discussion.

A book or two, combined with load data you can get online from bullet and powder makers, as well as forum in (when compared carefully with published loads) will probably do you fine. And one book will likely come with your starter kit, if you buy one of those.

The books do far more than give you load recipes. They have sections that describe the how and why of what you're doing, theory behind ballistics, pressure, etc.

Again, I don't mean to minimize the importance of reading up on the subject, I just don't think you need to fill a library right off the bat.

BTW, while you can get some seriously good info right here, the forums at www.handloads.com have a lot of very dedicated handloaders, and lots of published load data.

-- Sam
 

Divernhunter

Single-Sixer
Joined
Mar 4, 2004
Messages
263
Location
Denair,Ca,USA
First buy a manual. I strongly suggest the Lyman Reloading manual. If you buy a RCBS starter kit you will get a speer manual. If you buy a Hornady kit you will get a Hornady manual and I believe if you get a lee kit you will get a lee manual. Lee is the cheapest and I my mind it is cheap stuff. I have seen it and used it. The lee hand primer is one of the few lee items I like and be sure to lube it or it will break/wear out. I suggest a RCBS or Hornady kit to start with. You can get the extras such as electrnic scales etc as you go. I loaded for 40 years before I got my first one.
IF you can find someone near you to help you that is great. I have helped several people to learn and showed them some tricks to help make accurate good ammo easier. If not then the Lyman book and being carefull will be all you need to do to learn. It is not rocket science but remember you are building little bombs which you set off right next to your face/hands. I learned on my own when I was in grammer school and still have all my body parts and I am sure you can also. If you need help you can contact me or ask here. Just remember you may get different answers/ways to get to the same end product by different people. One may not be better than the next and it is up to you to decide which way you do things.
 

john guedry

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 19, 2008
Messages
326
Location
La.
+1 on the Lyman book. I started with one and although I have others it's still my "go to" manual.
 

FrontSite

Single-Sixer
Joined
Sep 29, 2006
Messages
144
Location
Ohio
I have to agree with Yosemite... with the internet and all the research you
can do there, I would say buy one or two reloading manuals before you buy any equipment..
Looks like your doing handgun loads so I would also
say get the Lee ($15) & Lyman Handgun book ($20) and sit on the couch and read them.
Each one favors their respective products... and keep in
mind that ATK owns about every brand except Lee.

Now.. I'll also say the Lee is inexpensive but in no way is it cheap and for
a beginner, provides the best bang for the buck. Buy their Classic Cast
Turret press and I doubt you will ever need another.

Good Luck .. have fun and be safe..

FrontSite
 

Rclark

Hunter
Joined
Jan 1, 2009
Messages
3,370
Location
Butte, MT
FYI, the RCBS starter kit comes with a manual to get you started. Same with Hornady. Two or more manuals is necessary for cross checking.

I wouldn't worry about an electronic scale. The kits come with a scale already. I've been reloading since 1979 or so and haven't needed one yet.

No need for classes. Just read up on the subject and understand the process. Reloading is actually really easy. Just need to pay attention to what you are doing. It isn't rocket science.

Also, I always tumbled before resizing. Clean up the cases before putting in the dies. Now, I only tumble when I feel the cases need it.... which turns out isn't often! This is a personal choice of course.
 

w5lx

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 25, 2002
Messages
334
Location
North Texas
This has been a great thread full of good information. Thanks for asking the question kingarthur. With the price of factory Colt .45's approaching $1 a round, I'm getting back into reloading after several years absence. I sold my single stage press and equipment many years ago when spare time to reload became rare. I will only be reloading for handguns so I've decided for me, the best choice will be the Lee Classic Turrent Press Kit with Lee dies, the Cabella brass tumbling kit, and some other minor hardware. I have several manuals already and agree that the Lyman is the best for my needs. More than one good manual is necessary for load comparison. My 2nd choice is the Speer manual. Besides being fun and interesting, reloading can save you a bunch of money.

"BTW, while you can get some seriously good info right here, the forums at www.handloads.com have a lot of very dedicated handloaders, and lots of published load data."

And thanks to Sam for this link. It's a new one for me and loaded with good info.
 

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