Cerakote vs Blue : cost benefits cons?

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FLgun

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Wondering what the benefits of having a revolver or its parts such as a cylinder for example, re blued vs cerakote. Is cerakote typically much more durable, longer lasting? Does it cost more vs bluing? Can a part be too thick with cerakote to function properly?
 

Enigma

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1. Cerekote will be worn off going in and out of a holster, especially a kydex holster. Ask the USMC about that.
2. Probably, assuming that you can even find anyone local who still blues.
3. Yes. It will also gunk up threads and small pin/spring holes if they're left unmasked.
 

hittman

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I could offer all sorts of comments, but for me it basically boils down to one thing: when a blued finish shows wear or scratches I can do "touch up", but that's really not an option with any kind of spray on coating. So I'm comfortable with spray on finishes on military-type firearms (FALs, AKs, Lee-Enfields, etc.), many of which were originally manufactured that way, and IMHO don't look terrible if they look like they've "gone to see the elephant". But for civilian-type firearms, which likely includes most revolvers, my personal preference is a blued or stainless finish that I can keep looking presentable.

On a related topic, I absolutely detest cerakote-type finishes on plastic/polymer parts. I've got a spare Ruger Security 9 (Model 3847) grip frame that I purchased used: it apparently started out as a black polymer frame that Ruger sprayed tan at the factory, but after being used for a while by the previous owner, the coating wore off all of the high points, letting the black show through. In all honesty, it looks like it caught leprosy or gangrene and died. Worst thing is, the coating wasn't tough enough to survive normal wear, but what's left of the finish is too tough to remove with chemicals that won't melt the plastic. If a manufacturer wants a tan plastic grip frame that will survive normal use, they should manufacture it from tan plastic, NOT black plastic with tan spray paint on top.

FWIW, I also like parkerized finishes, and do my own parkerizing (parts like receivers, definitely not barrels), as well as spray-on/bake-on finishes using my own parts oven. It's all a matter of personal preference.

As always IMHO, FWIW, YMMV, etc.
:)
 
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...its a no brainer, 'cerakote is just that , a coating, and much like Ruger learned and found out back in the 1957 era, when he tried the 'Martin coating" on the lightweight cylinders, duh, it chipped and flaked , what coating does when parts, hit, and rub together.............:(:cool::rolleyes:
heck after all these years playing with guns I learned LONG ago, the 1950s, even "leather" plays hell on a firearms finish,,,,,wish I had a PENNY for every gun we refinished over all these years, and MOSTLY from wear and tear, use....:unsure:
 

bykerhd

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Blued is just a "rust" coating. Not much protection but it is and what has been done for along, long time.
You could go for something like electroless nickel for better protection and wear but I would go for plain old bluing for this gun.'
 
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I'll do Cerakote on aluminum grip frames. But I prefer bluing on the rest. The biggest issue is no one does bluing anymore, at least local. An extremely durable coating is Melonite- salt bath nitriding. Again, no one local does it. But it is amazingly durable, rust resistant, and has a satin black finish.

I have also used Cerakote on car parts. The Elite series is the most durable and I use it on the bolts on my Jeep hinges. It's more durable than powder coat and doesn't chip off when tightening.
 

wilecoyote

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always doubtful about cerakote factory finish,
and ruthlessly suspicious about the same on used guns:
from the depths of my OCD, it is always to hide some major flaw_
 

Onty

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An extremely durable coating is Melonite- salt bath nitriding. Again, no one local does it. But it is amazingly durable, rust resistant, and has a satin black finish.

I have also used Cerakote on car parts. The Elite series is the most durable and I use it on the bolts on my Jeep hinges. It's more durable than powder coat and doesn't chip off when tightening.

Interesting info!

I have an old Mauser style hunting rifle. I've got it from my father, and fits me like a glove. Unfortunately, due the circumstances (missing during the war for several years) barrel bore is in poor condition, so I was thinking about rebarrelling it.

Ultimately, I would like to have stainless barrel, but would like to have whole rifle in black, uniform finish, to look like old style somewhat shiny bluing. I do not like that dull finish on old rifle. To all here, in your opinion and experience, what would be the best finish I should go for? Please list at least two options. Thanks!
 
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Ceracoat is fine for materials that can't be blued. There can be issues due to the fact that is a 'COATING' and may create problems with close tolerance parts.
I had a beater P85 'coated' years back. I'm not sure if it ever functioned properly after the process or maybe I just gave up and quit wasting ammo trying. :mad:
 

Enigma

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Interesting info!

I have an old Mauser style hunting rifle. I've got it from my father, and fits me like a glove. Unfortunately, due the circumstances (missing during the war for several years) barrel bore is in poor condition, so I was thinking about rebarrelling it.

Ultimately, I would like to have stainless barrel, but would like to have whole rifle in black, uniform finish, to look like old style somewhat shiny bluing. I do not like that dull finish on old rifle. To all here, in your opinion and experience, what would be the best finish I should go for? Please list at least two options. Thanks!

Stainless steel can be finished in a few ways; melonited/salt-bath nitrided, DLC, and a few others that I'm not truly familiar with; Bobby Tyler also offers a "blued" finish for it.
 

magpouch

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There is a product called Guncoat that is a baked on finish. It works wonderfully over a parkerised finish or even just a blasted finish. Also available in many colors. You can spray threads with no issue, it is a very thin coat. Although it is very durable, it will still wear wherever metal rubs metal or on high surfaces if it rubs, just like blueing will. It is a VERY durable "paint" that makes the firearm pretty well impervious to rust if its applied properly.
 

FLgun

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There is a product called Guncoat that is a baked on finish. It works wonderfully over a parkerised finish or even just a blasted finish. Also available in many colors. You can spray threads with no issue, it is a very thin coat. Although it is very durable, it will still wear wherever metal rubs metal or on high surfaces if it rubs, just like blueing will. It is a VERY durable "paint" that makes the firearm pretty well impervious to rust if its applied properly.
Good to know about other products out there. Thank you
 
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If Cerakote (which is a ceramic based coating and is very tough) is applied correctly, it will only add about 0.0005" to the dimensions of what it is on. If done correctly, the Cerakote applier will mask off or plug anything that doesn't need the coating. As said, the coating basically seals the metal meaning it will be rust proof - as long as it is not abused. If it gets worn, scratched, dinged, then the owner will need to pay attention to the firearm just like a blued gun. Any part that gets worn through can be recoated without having to recoat the complete gun. Typically, if you see a manufacturers gun in a color other than blued, nitrated, etc, the coating is Cerakote. It is producted by the largest manufacturer in the US for coating metals - NIC Industries. I've been Cerakoting firearms and other things for over 12 years and I haven't have any complaints from my customers about it yet.

I will agree that it is not for everyone, even I like a well blued firearm (especially with real nice wood) but it does have it's place, especially when you may have a basket case firearm that you might want to revive. Here is one I revived (and the outside was in bad condition when I got it (but the rifling and the cylinder chambers were in great condition):
DSCN0397.JPG
 

TINCANBANDIT is back

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I am with the old timers here, bluing is the way to go for steel and anodizing is the way to go for aluminum, just no comparison, with perhaps the one exception of color case hardening on steel.

Here is my model 29-3 .....you cannot tell me this would look better with cerakote or any other painted on coating

IMG_5137.JPG
 

contender

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As Ron has mentioned,, Cerakote has it's place.
And it can be a very durable finish. But no finish is impervious to some form of wear. Even stainless can rust or discolor.

And while different finishes have been tried over the decades,, Cerakote seems to be better than many of the previous ones. Bluing is a truly good traditional finish,, and is beautiful when done correctly. But it's a PIA to do right, and the expense to get one done by a gunsmith may be beyond what a person may want to spend. And yes,, many, many gunsmiths have stopped doing them because of the amount of work it takes to do AND maintain the tanks the salts, etc.

But I fully agree that certain guns should be blued instead of using Cerakote. That S&W above is a prime example.

I had Ron do Cerakote on a Ruger NM Blackhawk I had gotten from a friend. It had been abused, and had a lot of pitting etc. Some of that was able to be buffed out,, yet much of it was too bad to be buffed. I chose to go with Cerakote instead of trying to get it reblued. While it's not as nice as it was when new,, it's much better than what it was when I got it.
 

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