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ConradM

Blackhawk
Joined
Mar 9, 2009
Messages
512
Went to clean my SR9 a few days ago and was having a hell of a time trying to get my back cover off. Turns out my striker spring cup was cracked and sitting more to the rear jamming in the rear cover.

I emailed Ruger and they're are sending me a new striker assembly no questions! :shock:

Now does anyone know if the spring cups have been updated to something more durable, like metal?
 

Rhino

Bearcat
Joined
Aug 17, 2009
Messages
15
Mine is a 2009 build date,not sure what month but as of 2009 the stricker spring cup is still plastic.
SN# 330-65XXX

Personnaly I would be suprised if your cutting the stricker spring is not more the reason of your premature failuer as opposed to the material the cup is made from ?

Not saying this is the cause but it dose give reason for pause.

Regards.
 

Cheesewhiz

Hunter
Joined
Feb 8, 2008
Messages
2,114
ConradM":blo2w5la said:
Went to clean my SR9 a few days ago and was having a hell of a time trying to get my back cover off. Turns out my striker spring cup was cracked and sitting more to the rear jamming in the rear cover.

I emailed Ruger and they're are sending me a new striker assembly no questions! :shock:

Now does anyone know if the spring cups have been updated to something more durable, like metal?

ConradM, I said a long time ago on this forum if you cut the striker spring, you will have problems with the cups.
 

ConradM

Blackhawk
Joined
Mar 9, 2009
Messages
512
I thought about that.. But it doesn't make sense. The cut end of the spring is down in the striker body. Nothing changed between the cup and the spring. If anything there should be less pressure on the cup.
 

ConradM

Blackhawk
Joined
Mar 9, 2009
Messages
512
If anyone can give me a good reason as to why a shorter spring would crack my spring cup then I might use the new one. Maybe I'm missing something? :?

I could understand it being an issue if the cut end was against the cup, jabbing into it...
 

Cheesewhiz

Hunter
Joined
Feb 8, 2008
Messages
2,114
An encapsulated spring is under some form of pressure, even in the relaxed state. Cutting the spring short allows play, play allows slap, slap causes problems. That play can lead to the cup being out of line with the shortened spring, bye-bye cup. Although engineers can be major pains in the A$$, they normally aren't stupid. If something is engineered and made a certain way, it most probably is the correct way.
 

Rhino

Bearcat
Joined
Aug 17, 2009
Messages
15
I am not any type of gunsmith but there is a reason the engineers designed the gun the way they did. Now if you’r so convinced that your modifications had nothing to do with the failure that’s fine and dandy, I don’t have to fix mine you do.

I however am of the school "If it aint broke don’t fix it"

Not to mention this is the first I have heard of a striker spring cup breaking, and it seems to be more than coincidence that you modified your striker spring, not to say it has not happened before but this is my first experience with it

If it looks like a duck and it quacks like a duck I call it a duck 8)

YMMV
Regards.
 

ConradM

Blackhawk
Joined
Mar 9, 2009
Messages
512
Cheesewhiz":1u0oqeb7 said:
An encapsulated spring is under some form of pressure, even in the relaxed state. Cutting the spring short allows play, play allows slap, slap causes problems. That play can lead to the cup being out of line with the shortened spring, bye-bye cup. Although engineers can be major pains in the A$$, they normally aren't stupid. If something is engineered and made a certain way, it most probably is the correct way.

Nope, no play. There is still plenty of tension on the cup.
 

ConradM

Blackhawk
Joined
Mar 9, 2009
Messages
512
Rhino":zrz9gyc2 said:
I am not any type of gunsmith but there is a reason the engineers designed the gun the way they did. Now if you’r so convinced that your modifications had nothing to do with the failure that’s fine and dandy, I don’t have to fix mine you do.

I however am of the school "If it aint broke don’t fix it"

Not to mention this is the first I have heard of a striker spring cup breaking, and it seems to be more than coincidence that you modified your striker spring, not to say it has not happened before but this is my first experience with it

If it looks like a duck and it quacks like a duck I call it a duck 8)

YMMV
Regards.

Not me. I'm inclined to think it's more common than we think seeing as how they're sending me a new one in response to a single email without even a mention of sending the gun or striker assembly back.
 

ConradM

Blackhawk
Joined
Mar 9, 2009
Messages
512
Rhino":2qxl8xrb said:
Yeah and did you happen to mention you modified the spring ???

Why would I do that? I simply described the problem that I have, which is a cracked spring cup. If modifications were a concern to Ruger then I'm sure they would either inquire about it or request that the gun and or striker assembly be sent in.
 

ConradM

Blackhawk
Joined
Mar 9, 2009
Messages
512
Like I said, it must be a common occurrence. Shipping out new parts at just a mention of a failure would insinuate such.
 

Cheesewhiz

Hunter
Joined
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Messages
2,114
ConradM":5anedwny said:
Like I said, it must be a common occurrence. Shipping out new parts at just a mention of a failure would insinuate such.

Yeah, it's a common occurence if you cut your striker spring.
 

Edirty692

Bearcat
Joined
Jun 21, 2009
Messages
65
You keep cutting springs & fixing your SR9. Not a problem for anyone hear but you. Take some advice from people they are only trying to help.
 

Rhino

Bearcat
Joined
Aug 17, 2009
Messages
15
ConradM":3jjp13hj said:
Like I said, it must be a common occurrence. Shipping out new parts at just a mention of a failure would insinuate such.

Hey it’s your gun not mine, and you can assume anything you like but without any type of documented proof that this is a common occurrence Ill stick with what more likely than not is the cause of the failure.

I have a little over a 1000 rds through mine and not so much as a hiccup and I can only go off my personal experience with the SR9.

Now if anyone has links or information on this “common occurrence”, please post them here as I would like more proof that this is becoming a problem.

Regards.
 

jhearne

Buckeye
Joined
Jul 14, 2007
Messages
1,365
ConradM":j7s6ia8d said:
Like I said, it must be a common occurrence. Shipping out new parts at just a mention of a failure would insinuate such.

Doesn't automatically point to a flawed design, but it also points to a Company's willingness to replace small cheap parts on their dime when and if they fail.

Just last Friday I broke the pocket clip on my SOG Twitch II at work. Was walking around the shelving and it snagged, yanked it out of my pocket and flung it about 8 feet back. Went to bend it back and it snapped. I found SOG has a Clip Warranty, unconditional at that. Emailed them around 3 and by 330 or so I had a request for my shipping info for the new one. Not in yet, but coming from Washington takes a few days to get to TX. I'm in no hurry.

Wanting to make the Customer happy doesn't mean admitting fault or flaws, just a willingness to keep you as a customer.

Josh
 

jhearne

Buckeye
Joined
Jul 14, 2007
Messages
1,365
Also I'd agree with Cheese here, cutting the spring is more reason that it broke than just because it's made of plastic. Plastic pieces have some self lubricating qualities when against metal. We use plastic in some of our machines we're designing now, cuts cost and reduces metal to metal contact and the need to lube them. Some things will wear over time but the cost to replace them is minimal.

Josh
 

Cheesewhiz

Hunter
Joined
Feb 8, 2008
Messages
2,114
ConradM":2bsmwdkf said:
Cheesewhiz":2bsmwdkf said:
An encapsulated spring is under some form of pressure, even in the relaxed state. Cutting the spring short allows play, play allows slap, slap causes problems. That play can lead to the cup being out of line with the shortened spring, bye-bye cup. Although engineers can be major pains in the A$$, they normally aren't stupid. If something is engineered and made a certain way, it most probably is the correct way.

Nope, no play. There is still plenty of tension on the cup.

I missed this one, when the spring that you say has plenty of tension even though it's cut shot, is compressed it will compress to a short side instead of compressing evenly. That is whole my point.

Do you ever wonder why when you try to trade in a gun you get about 1/2 to 2/3's what it is really worth, I can tell you, amautuer gunsmiths. I have horror stories about guns that I have seen that have been traded in.
 

ConradM

Blackhawk
Joined
Mar 9, 2009
Messages
512
Edirty692":12rya9o3 said:
You keep cutting springs & fixing your SR9. Not a problem for anyone hear but you. Take some advice from people they are only trying to help.

This my first ever issue with the SR9. :lol:
 

ConradM

Blackhawk
Joined
Mar 9, 2009
Messages
512
Cheesewhiz":3ks0x8rb said:
ConradM":3ks0x8rb said:
Cheesewhiz":3ks0x8rb said:
An encapsulated spring is under some form of pressure, even in the relaxed state. Cutting the spring short allows play, play allows slap, slap causes problems. That play can lead to the cup being out of line with the shortened spring, bye-bye cup. Although engineers can be major pains in the A$$, they normally aren't stupid. If something is engineered and made a certain way, it most probably is the correct way.

Nope, no play. There is still plenty of tension on the cup.

I missed this one, when the spring that you say has plenty of tension even though it's cut shot, is compressed it will compress to a short side instead of compressing evenly. That is whole my point.

Do you ever wonder why when you try to trade in a gun you get about 1/2 to 2/3's what it is really worth, I can tell you, amautuer gunsmiths. I have horror stories about guns that I have seen that have been traded in.

That's what I was looking for. You really think this slight difference would be enough to crack the cup?
 
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