single six magnum cylinder.

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eveled

Hunter
Joined
Apr 3, 2012
Messages
3,663
Did Ruger ever make a fluted Magnum cylinder for a new model convertible single six?

It looks like the Talo limited edition engraved one has a fluted magnum cylinder, and I've never seen one before.
 

awp101

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 25, 2011
Messages
281
The one on top is a fluted .22 Mag:
19235756798_f064745d8f_b.jpg


I found out the hard way it's a Mag cylinder. It is not marked and the rig was sold to me as a .22LR. First range trip, it keyholed at 7 yds. It hit me about 3AM the next morning it might be a Mag. Range trip the next day confirmed it.
 

Mtneer

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 15, 2015
Messages
180
Wow! I'd never seen a fluted .22 Magnum cylinder from Ruger before. Not that I've seen all that many single-sixes anyway. But what do you think caused the .22 LR bullets from it to keyhole at 7 yards? I've heard of split cases when firing .22 LRs in a .22 Magnum cylinder, but not keyholing bullets at 7 yards. You've got my curiosity up. :?: :)
 

GRAMPS 51

Buckeye
Joined
Feb 19, 2007
Messages
1,376
That is because your not supposed to shoot 22 LR Long or Short rimfire out of a 22 magnum cylinder the mag has a bigger diameter case if you want to shoot the LR Long or Short you have to change the cylinder

Gramps
 

Mtneer

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 15, 2015
Messages
180
GRAMPS 51 said:
That is because your not supposed to shoot 22 LR Long or Short rimfire out of a 22 magnum cylinder the mag has a bigger diameter case if you want to shoot the LR Long or Short you have to change the cylinder

Gramps

Yeah, I understand that a .22 Magnum case is larger in diameter than a .22 LR case Gramps. The .22 Magnum bullet is actually a little larger in diameter than a .22 LR bullet for that matter. And I understand that because a .22 Magnum case is larger in diameter than a .22 LR case, if a person fire's .22 LRs in a .22 Magnum cylinders, it can, and has resulted in split .22 LR cases.

My question is why were the bullets "keyholing" at 7 yards? Ruger has probably built tens of thousands of Single-Sixes with interchangeable cylinders to accommodate both .22 Magnums and .22 LRs, but of all of those Single-Sixes, not one of them has an interchangeable barrel. Ruger's Single-Six barrels accommodate both .22 LR bullets as well as the slightly larger in diameter .22 Magnum bullets.

So I asked again; Why do you think the bullets from the .22 LRs fired from the .22 Magnum cylinder tumbled, resulting in keyholing at 7 yards? Could it be because they were out of whack when they entered the revolver's forcing cone? That's just a guess. I'm curious, that's all. :?:
 

pete44ru

Hunter
Joined
Dec 6, 2004
Messages
2,176
.

My .22 Mag RSSM-W (ca.1960) has a fluted cylinder - but it's an Old Model (3-screw).

RSSM_LH_Closeup.jpg



.
 

awp101

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 25, 2011
Messages
281
It didn't keyhole every round at 7yds, only some of them. At 25 I couldn't even get it on paper consistently and most of the ones that did hit paper went in sideways.

I had one of those 0300 thinking sessions and I realized things just didn't "sound" right, it sounded almost like a suppressed .22. I had a guy at the bench next to me sighting in 2 different caliber ARs so it didn't seem odd to me that the .22s didn't sound as loud as normal. I even had a couple of case splits but I chalked that up to the ammo being old. That's when it hit me during that thinking session: this thing isn't a .22 Mag is it?

Near as I can figure, it was probably a combination of longer jump from the case to the cone, hitting the forcing cone wrong and velocity loss due to the larger chambers.

Took it out the next day with Mag ammo and it was right as rain.
 

Mtneer

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 15, 2015
Messages
180
Thanks awp101. :)
Hitting the forcing cone wrong was the only guess I had. I hadn't thought about the velocity loss due to the larger chambers, but I'll bet that could have been a factor too.
I have a super accurate Kimber .22 bolt action rifle. That is, it's "super accurate" as long as I use standard or high-velocity ammo in it. Using that sub-sonic stuff, it keyholes nearly every bullet at 25 yards. It took me 3 shots with that stuff to hit a rabbit in my wife's vegetable garden, and he was only 15 feet away - standing still!
Anyway, thanks. And I'm glad there was no damage to either you or your revolver. :D
 

rugnelli

Buckeye
Joined
Apr 24, 2007
Messages
1,447
Fluted magnum cylinders up until at least 1975 on Single-Sixes and possibly up until the end of 1977 when the billboard was added.
 

Mtneer

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 15, 2015
Messages
180
rugnelli said:
Fluted magnum cylinders up until at least 1975 on Single-Sixes and possibly up until the end of 1977 when the billboard was added.

Could be, but my wife's 1976 Single-Six, "Made In The 200th Year Of American Liberty" model, has a non-fluted magnum cylinder.
 

street

Hunter
Joined
Jan 10, 2008
Messages
2,447
Ruger produced fluted .22 magnum cylinders up till 1975 for the blue Super Single-Sixes and for the Stainless Steel Super Single-Sixes they were made up to 1976. For the 200th yr. Stainless guns the 5 1/2 and 6 1/2 in barrel guns will come both ways. As for the very rare 4 5/8 in. Stainless guns, so far only the fluted magnum cylinders have been found. So far no 9 1/2 in 200th yr. Stainless guns have been found.
 

rugnelli

Buckeye
Joined
Apr 24, 2007
Messages
1,447
My 1975 stainless 4 5/8" Single-Six is fluted but I wasn't sure how long it continued if at all...
 

Hondo44

Hawkeye
Joined
Apr 3, 2009
Messages
7,708
Old and new model cylinders are interchangeable. When the new models were introduced in 1973, they continued Ruger continued making cyls the same way; both were fluted. They they got a brainstorm to make the mag cyls easier to identify by switching to the non-fluted mag cyl. and even roll marking the cal. Saved a few bucks as well, less machining.

Even though it was simple to tell from this:
OM22cylinders.jpg


Also they saved another buck by doing this to the LR cyl as well (LR on left, Mag on right), since c. 1975-1976 none of Ruger's .22 cylinders have the firing pin groove at the rear. Besides the extra cutting of the groove isn't needed on new models because opening the loading gate locks the hammer. Plus the transfer bar disallows hammer-to-firing pin contact unless the trigger is held back, which eliminates the firing pin from contacting the cyl face when the cyl is not locked in battery. It can still happen but much harder to do:
aastlscyls_zpsf591a0bc.jpg


Also notice that the ratchet diameter is smaller on the left hand cyl. This change came about once the .32 H&R Mag single sixes were introduced in 1984 with their larger case head.
 

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