Range Report on my 6" GP 100

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Rex Driver

Bearcat
Joined
Oct 8, 2007
Messages
60
I just got back from the range after a test session with my new Stainless 6" GP 100 and had an excellent time. The accuracy of this gun exceeded my expectations and it was a ball of fun to shoot. I shot loads using 158 Grain RNFP lead bullets in various head stamp 38spl cases and 4.3 grains of Winchester 231 Powder, with Winchester small pistol primers.

I did have one small issue with about a 2 to 3% FTF on the first attempt with seemingly ample strike on the primer, they all went off on a second attempt.
The only alteration done was to add Wilson Combat Custom tune springs both hammer and trigger using what they identify as their #9 springs. I ran 200 rounds through the gun and had anywhere from 4 to 6 FTFs. My question is, should I replace the springs with the number 10 springs or perhaps first go back and see if Federal Primers will work better in the gun?

I still have the stock Ruger springs as well as the #10 springs for hammer and trigger as well as a #12 Hammer spring.

Any help will be appreciated as inquiring minds need to know!
 

sfhogman

Buckeye
Joined
Nov 18, 2002
Messages
1,764
Myself, I'd go back to the stock mainspring and see what happens. generally light strikes are more likely to make themselves known when the gun is fired double-action.

My first suspect, however, would be high primers.

JMO,
Jeff
 

DGW1949

Hunter
Joined
Apr 10, 2005
Messages
3,638
I'm with sfhogman. Put the Ruger spring back in and see if that don't fix her up.

FWIW.....
I aint a big fan of light-weight hammer springs. Nor of guns which have to be fed a specific primer.
And just so you'll know.... All FTF's aint misfires. Some of them are hang-fires. So be sure with your next one that you keep the muzzle pointed down range for about 10-15 seconds before doing anything else. And whatever you do, don't just keep trying to shoot the gun untill after you remove the suspect round.

Better safe than sorry.

DGW
 

wixedmords

Blackhawk
Joined
Aug 5, 2006
Messages
903
There is some good information in this thread RD.

It is important to make sure you are seating your primers snugly. I hand-prime and run my thumbnail over the primer while putting it into the container of primed brass. I would also look at any handling of the primers on your part. Clean hands are important and the less you touch the primers the better when it comes to contamination. Part of reloading is knowing you have done the same process "correctly" over and over again. If you do this you won't question what you have done. It is important to walk away from the reloading process you just completed and feel confident about that process being right.

Part of any troubleshooting process is breaking down the changes from when something worked to what has caused something to not work. A general rule of thumb is to only make one change at a time, but things don't always work out that way in real life. Two good ways to approach multiple changes is to either "undo" one change at a time, or go completely back to what worked, and then make one change at a time.

Looking at the results of the situation, you can either question the gun or the ammo. We need to break that down and rule out one, either one. You can shoot a box or two of factory ammo and see if you have any more FTF. If you don't you have ruled out the gun, keeping in mind the components of the factory ammo, if you do have more FTF's, you can look more at the gun. What I mean by "components" of the factory ammo is if you buy some Winchester ammo, you are highly likely to get Winchester primers. With that info you are making a decision based on knowing the components.

Keep in mind the process of testing the changing of springs in a revolver usually means the spring is too weak when you have gotten to the point of misfires. But, one needs to know the ammo is bulletproof.
 

GP100man

Buckeye
Joined
Sep 13, 2006
Messages
1,386
I`ve found the #9 too lite for any primer !!
for a non sd/hd GP i use 10# & wwsp primers & double check that primers are seated& have had 100% fire .

for sd/hd the 12# hammer & 10# trigger for positive reset is as lite as i`ll go .

lite is nice but smooth is where it`s at !
 

Rex Driver

Bearcat
Joined
Oct 8, 2007
Messages
60
I want to thank everybody for their opinions and suggestions and I think that GP 100Man has hit the nail on the head. I am going back to the shop and have them replace the #9 springs with the #s 10 & 12 and return to the range. Wixmords, your thoughts were very well thought out and I would have offered the same advice, I am new to double action Rugers, however, an old hand at reloading and have only had one squib in five years of Cowboy Shooting (Darn Trail Boss tends to bridge a lee measure doing small loads around the 3 grain level) I am one of those anal reloaders who often runs the brass through the tumbler, deprimes, cleans the primer pockets and most likely am one of few who will on occasion trim 38spl brass.
After the reloads are done I have one vaquero with a very tight clearance at the back of the cylinder so I place rounds in the gun and spin the cylinder to make sure the primers are not high. I like to reload almost as much as shoot and, did I say I am anal about the process?

Again, thank you one and all for your time and thoughts to help me out with this problem, this site is a great place to learn, remember and, on at times, chuckle at things that people do that I have already had problems with.

I am having a problem, however, I have just had a bad case of wanting a 4" GP 100 to go with the stainless 6". Saw a blue one in a local trading post for $425. I wonder how I will be able to tell the wife that it is a gun that I have had all along?
 

Harry1

Bearcat
Joined
Mar 1, 2008
Messages
4
Wow... I would not touch my 4inch gp. Double action is good, not S&W but good. Single action gives S&W a good go for the money.
 

GP100man

Buckeye
Joined
Sep 13, 2006
Messages
1,386
Rex Driver

I`m very anal `bout my sd ammo i load i even inspect the primers & run em thru the actio & each chamber on a revolver.

I have helped some GPs run 100% with the 10#hammer spring by shimming the hammer. For SD though i`d rather not ride that fence!!
 

Pal Val

Buckeye
Joined
May 30, 2006
Messages
1,529
If you switched to a lighter spring and didn't clean up the action (it tends to have a lot of rough spots), you saw the results. You will need the heavier springs to overcome all the friction. I learned that in this forum years ago from Iowegan. Since then, I have used his instructions to work the actions of half a dozen GP-100s and SP101s, all with fine results.

The "secret" is in his IBOK, which I right now don't know if is still available.
 

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