Question about Ruger 44 Carbine????

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Dawgball

Bearcat
Joined
Sep 15, 2009
Messages
2
Location
Michigan
Ruger Folks-
Im getting ready to make a purchase on a Ruger 44 Carbine(not the Deerfield). Before i do is there anything to know about the awesome little carbines. For example, feeding problems or anything that i might want to look for. I have heard of feeding problems with the heavier grained bullets. It will be my full time deer rifle and will be used for bear hunting as well. Any inputs are more than welcome. Good and Bad.

Thanks in advance
Nate
 

Dawgball

Bearcat
Joined
Sep 15, 2009
Messages
2
Location
Michigan
1. No lead bullets
2. No lubricant that gums up
3. Being older guns try to stay away from "Hot Loads"...I dont hand load so it isnt a problem for me.


Anything else?

Thanks Nate
 

wwb

Hunter
Joined
Nov 18, 2004
Messages
2,843
Location
wisconsin
240 grain jacketed bullets at "normal" load levels, and you'll have no problems.

Non-jacketed bullets (even plated bullets) will plug the gas port, causing you to learn all sorts of new words.

Heavy loads will pound the dickens out of the action.... and, if anything breaks, replacement parts are near impossible to find.

Light loads probably won't cycle the action reliably... it's tuned to work over a very narrow range of loads.

Great brush guns, light, quick to point, and all you need out to 75 - 100 yards.
 

pete44ru

Hunter
Joined
Dec 6, 2004
Messages
2,176
Location
Rhode Island
[Im getting ready to make a purchase on a Ruger 44 Carbine(not the Deerfield). Before i do is there anything to know about the awesome little carbines. For example, feeding problems or anything that i might want to look for.]

A "deal breaker" would be a cracked/broken forward flange on the trigger housing, where it ties into the bottom of the receiver - as they are non-repairable and unobtainium.

When the housing's broken or cracked, the front of the housing - which contains the feed mechanism - will "float" during cycling, jamming the next round out of the mag, every time.

If you cannot remove the barreled action from the stock to check that spot for play, then next best is to hold the receiver firmly in one hand while the other hand tries to work the front of the housing up/down with one finger inside the mag throat area.
If there's ANY movement - I would "pass", on the rifle.

Ditto with a cracked stock - which gets that way by someone being careless while the barreled action is out of the wood - they generally crack in the thin/large inletting for the gas cylinder & operating rod in the middle of the forend.

.
 

TDF

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 23, 2006
Messages
208
Location
Seward, NE
I've had two and both cycled 300 gr handloads perfectly reliably. As long as the OAL of the cartridge isn't too long I think heavy bullet loads are fine for them. I'd be thinking of going with heavy bullets for bear.

TDF
 

JimD

Bearcat
Joined
Sep 28, 2006
Messages
2
Location
United States
I like Nosler's 250 gr partition over 21 grains of H110 or W 296. Feeding problems largely come from exceeding the 1.610" OAL. I lapped the piston assembly when I had occassion to remove gunk and lead from cast bullets. Stick with jacketed bullets.
 

mattsbox99

Hunter
Joined
Jan 12, 2009
Messages
3,391
Location
Montana 'Merica
I have the Deerfield and its an awesome little gun. I have pretty much no specific use for it, but its very cool and mine shoots 1.5" groups at 100 yards with Hornady LeverEvolution and my handloads. You'll enjoy the little carbine a lot.
 
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