Need some help Redhawk vs Super Blackhawk.

Help Support Ruger Forum:

Marlin Mike

Bearcat
Joined
Dec 19, 2008
Messages
28
I have no experience with a 44 Magnum in a revolver. The biggest revolver I have fired is a 357 mag. I am looking for advice from people who know more than I do. Which is the better 44 (ie. less recoil with a factory 240 gr.) Regular Redhawk or Super Blackhawk both will be 5 1/2" barrels. I will be using this for defense from feral hogs, wolf, and black bear. I just don't trust a 357 to have enough power. I do have smaller hands so that is definitely an issue. Thanks for any advice. Mike
 

eveled

Hunter
Joined
Apr 3, 2012
Messages
3,769
I think the double action Redhawk, would be the better choice for your purposes, than the single action Blackhawk. If strictly for defense, I would want a short barrel, which makes the Super Redhawk Alaskan probably the best choice. Those big cushy rubber grips should help considerably with recoil, over the wood grips of the Blackhawk.
http://www.ruger.com/products/superRedhawkAlaskan/models.html
 

stevemb

Hunter
Joined
Aug 8, 2012
Messages
2,769
Big cushy grips vs smaller hands the real issue here, me too ! With similar hand size issues, the 5 1/2" SBH may be the better choice for you if used to SA's.. Wrap your hands around everything you can(that wife allows) before choosing.
 

tulsamal

Blackhawk
Joined
Apr 30, 2005
Messages
920
I would probably say Redhawk as well. With the caveat that you need aftermarket grips. I actually like the feel of the roundish wood grips that came on my 5.5" .41 Redhawk but they had me bleeding within 20 rounds. Top of the grip frame smacks the back of your thumb every shot, eventually the skin wears through and you bleed.

The key to mastering any of the big revolvers is to shoot them a lot... but not with max loads. Don't just walk out there and start shooting full house Magnums. You will get the biggest flinch of all time. You should reload for the Magnums. They are easy to load with carbide dies, will save you a ton of money, and you can load middle range loads to get used to the whole thing. You can always buy a box or two of .44 Specials but that's going to cost you as much money as some really basic reloading gear. I started out with my Security Six and a little Lee Loader. Way back in 1982 after I bought it for myself on my 21st birthday. I would sit on the kitchen floor with that little Lee Loader and a hammer and reload away. I learned how it all worked and I was able to afford to shoot the new revolver. I bought a box of wadcutter .38 Special loads when I bought the gun but it didn't take long to shoot those. I've shot thousands and thousands of rounds through that SS and probably less than fifty have been factory .357 Magnums. Even more true when it comes to my .41 and .44 Magnums. And the .480. These are reloader guns. Period, end of story.
 

RalphS

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 30, 2011
Messages
115
You are really going to have to try them yourself to see which is better for you. Recoil is a personal issue.

Both come standard with wood grips. Both can have rubber grips put on them.

My favorite handgun is my Redhawk 44M 5.5 inch with Pachmayr Presentation grips on it. No problems shooting full power 240 gr. loads with it. With the Uncle Mikes grips on it, it still shoots well and doesn't hurt. With the factory wood grips, it hurts after the first shot.

I've shot handloads up to 355 gr. at 1220 fps out of it and my hands are still intact.
 

Chuck 100 yd

Hunter
Joined
Mar 20, 2010
Messages
3,251
I vote for the RedHawk. The .44 mag. 4" with that comes with the Hogue Bantam
grip would be just right for your purpose.
 

Bear Paw Jack

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 19, 2001
Messages
9,442
Marlin Mike, No one can answer that for you but you. Felt recoil is very different in both guns. Plus it depends on your previous shooting experience. I have shot a plow handled Single Action for almost 50 years. I have a great deal of confidence when that gun goes up the sights are on or extremely close to what I want to shoot. I am very big on the idea that the first shot is VERY IMPORTANT, when it comes to personal defense. If you have spent most of your life with a double action firearm chances are, that will be more comfortable and provide more confidence to you. Both of those things are incredibly important. Try them before buying if at all possible. Even if they are borrowed from a friend. If you were close to me I'd let you try mine.
 

s4s4u

Buckeye
Joined
Dec 16, 2006
Messages
1,891
I'd suggest a SRH or BH with a Bisley handle. Neither the RH nor the plowhandle BH handle heavy kickers as well, IMO.
 

whichwatch

Blackhawk
Joined
Dec 18, 2012
Messages
678
tulsamal said:
I would probably say Redhawk as well. With the caveat that you need aftermarket grips. I actually like the feel of the roundish wood grips that came on my 5.5" .41 Redhawk but they had me bleeding within 20 rounds. Top of the grip frame smacks the back of your thumb every shot, eventually the skin wears through and you bleed.
The key to mastering any of the big revolvers is to shoot them a lot... but not with max loads. Don't just walk out there and start shooting full house Magnums. You will get the biggest flinch of all time. You should reload for the Magnums. They are easy to load with carbide dies, will save you a ton of money, and you can load middle range loads to get used to the whole thing. You can always buy a box or two of .44 Specials but that's going to cost you as much money as some really basic reloading gear. I started out with my Security Six and a little Lee Loader. Way back in 1982 after I bought it for myself on my 21st birthday. I would sit on the kitchen floor with that little Lee Loader and a hammer and reload away. I learned how it all worked and I was able to afford to shoot the new revolver. I bought a box of wadcutter .38 Special loads when I bought the gun but it didn't take long to shoot those. I've shot thousands and thousands of rounds through that SS and probably less than fifty have been factory .357 Magnums. Even more true when it comes to my .41 and .44 Magnums. And the .480. These are reloader guns. Period, end of story.

Try some shooting gloves, or baseball batter's gloves. You can cut the index finger off at the first knuckle of the batter's glove to feel the trigger better.
 
Joined
Oct 26, 2006
Messages
9,324
Bear Paw Jack said:
Marlin Mike, No one can answer that for you but you. Felt recoil is very different in both guns. Plus it depends on your previous shooting experience. I have shot a plow handled Single Action for almost 50 years. I have a great deal of confidence when that gun goes up the sights are on or extremely close to what I want to shoot. I am very big on the idea that the first shot is VERY IMPORTANT, when it comes to personal defense. If you have spent most of your life with a double action firearm chances are, that will be more comfortable and provide more confidence to you. Both of those things are incredibly important. Try them before buying if at all possible. Even if they are borrowed from a friend. If you were close to me I'd let you try mine.
Yes, the first shot can make or break your situation. I have both a 4 inch RH,and a 4 5/8 inch SBH. I have shot DA most of my life, only within the last few years even owned a SA. There are people on the forum that grew up with the SA platform. That makes a difference in how well you can perform. I prefer the DA due to ease of one handed operation, and faster reloads. As BPJ said try to shoot both. If close to me, likewise we can go out and shoot both. :lol:
gramps
 

Jimbo357mag

Hawkeye
Joined
Feb 22, 2007
Messages
10,124
I would suggest the Redhawk. If you are familiar with a double-action 357 and want more power, then the Redhawk makes sense. I also have smaller hands and found the Redhawk factory wood grip worked well for me. Start shooting 44 specials and then add 44 magnums. You will find some brands of ammo more powerful than others. MagTech ammo is definitely lighter in recoil. Federal and Winchester are heavy in the recoil dept. Practice with the lighter stuff and carry the heavier stuff for protection. :D
 

BIgMuddy

Blackhawk
Joined
Feb 15, 2007
Messages
550
I think you have chosen two great firearms for your intended purpose. With factory grips for me the recoil with the SBH hurts less but flips more. I can make faster follow up shots with the Redhawk. Adding the cushion of rubber grips, those that cover the backstrap, and Big Red becomes pain free.

As has been stated its tough for someone else to tell you which one is best YOU and it would be great if you could try each before purchase.

I have a safe full of 44 mags and my 5.5" Redhawk would easily be the last one to go.

Good luck!

Dan
 

planetcat

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 10, 2009
Messages
290
I have a 4" redhawk .44 mag and a 5.5" Blackhawk .41 mag, and still find the redhawk more pleasant to shoot. They are both very different revolvers, but I think the extra weight of the redhawk and the hogue grips really help, despite the larger caliber. It's a very subjective thing. I know people that absolutely hate shooting magnum revolvers, where I am unphased even by S&W .500.
 

98Redline

Blackhawk
Joined
Dec 9, 2010
Messages
679
While I love my single actions, based on your intended use, I would suggest the Redhawk.
The double action is the primary reason. If you truly are carrying it for protection, sometimes that extra second required to cock the hammer is a second that you don't have. You also can follow up shots one handed.

For deer hunting, my SBH gets the nod, but if big bears are likely to be in the area, my Redhawk will be riding in a chest holster, always at the ready.
 

Onty

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 17, 2000
Messages
390
Marlin Mike said:
I have no experience with a 44 Magnum in a revolver. The biggest revolver I have fired is a 357 mag. I am looking for advice from people who know more than I do. Which is the better 44 (ie. less recoil with a factory 240 gr.) Regular Redhawk or Super Blackhawk both will be 5 1/2" barrels. I will be using this for defense from feral hogs, wolf, and black bear. I just don't trust a 357 to have enough power. I do have smaller hands so that is definitely an issue. Thanks for any advice. Mike
Redhawk has one BIG advantage over Super Blackhawk; no screws to get loose. Don't get me wrong, my preferred handgun is stainless 5.5 SBH converted to Bisley, but any SA should have all those screws secured so they would not get loose. Redhawk does not have such problem, the only screw, except on sights, is on the grip.

For most of shooters, Bisley grip is easier to handle recoil. As a matter of fact, some custom smiths will build their 475 ans 500 hand-cannons on Bisley revolvers only.

For your smaller hands, Bisley grip might be better than SBH. On top of that, it has shorter trigger reach, see here why:

Frames-ALL.jpg


Also, you can modify Bisley stocks to make it same thickness as on the top.

In addition, you can make relief right behind trigger guard, as done on some custom stocks. See the difference, left are custom stocks, right are factory ones:

DSC04082.JPG
New%20Blackhawk%20Bisley.jpg


Vacuum tube extension with sand paper is perfect for such modification. Remove stocks from grip frame, you do not want to slip and sand the steel, especially if it has blue finish. Also, go slowly with this relief, even small amount removed has a big effect how grip feels.

Although, not rugged and strong as Ruger revolvers, another excellent choice is S&W, model 29 (blue) or 629 (stainless), as long as you are not going to shoot truckload of 300 grain ammo. And if you can grab one of those Classic DX models, you will have handgun that shoots 1.5 inch on 50 yds, tested at the factory.

Here is one DX, see marking on barrel:

8540d1346219790-five-inch-29-629-classic-classic-dx-benchmade-026.jpg


My preference would be one 29/629-3 or -4. Those have so called Endurance Package, but no MIM parts. Here is the easy way to spot such revolver, look at the locking notches on cylinder; they are longer, and front side of the notch is longer than aft one, using small ramp as a reference. Revolver above is with Endurance Package. Bellow is without it, notice shorter locking notches:

629ClassicDX.jpg


Also, as far as i know, no MIM parts have revolvers with firing pin mounted on hammer, as those above.

Regarding dash number, it is located on the frame bellow barrel, just open cylinder:

329recall.jpg


This one is model 329-1, but you've got idea.
 

Three44s

Single-Sixer
Joined
Apr 7, 2005
Messages
303
For me it was DA all the way.

The RH is also stronger and can handle loads with the bullet set farther forward (provided the slug has a crimp groove that allows that) leaving more boiler room for powder. ......... a +P load if you will.

The swing out cylinder gives you faster reloads in the rare event that becomes necessary.

Three 44s
 

Latest posts

Top