More old aviation stuff. Wow, what a website.

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737tdi

Hunter
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May 31, 2006
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Scurry TX
If you have the time take a look at this site. It is loaded with awesome imagery. It is of some of the aircraft at the National Museum of the Air Force. Just looking at the cockpit of the XB70 is information overload. Bookmark the site because you won't see it all in one sitting. Use the cursors at the bottom to view the whole image.


http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/Visit/VirtualTour/Cockpit360.aspx


Semper Fi:

Karl
 

Jimbo357mag

Hawkeye
Joined
Feb 22, 2007
Messages
10,200
Location
So. Florida
Dang, I got in the STRATOFORTRESS cockpit and started moving the image around and I thought I was going to get sick.:D :D

http://www.nmusafvirtualtour.com/media/041/B-52D%20Pilot%20Station.html
 
Joined
Sep 1, 2003
Messages
5,508
Location
Richmond Texas USA
Jimbo357mag said:
Dang, I got in the STRATOFORTRESS cockpit and started moving the image around and I thought I was going to get sick.:D :D

http://www.nmusafvirtualtour.com/media/041/B-52D%20Pilot%20Station.html

Well Jimbo,
You probably don't want to go do any aerobatics with me do ya??? :D :D :D Things do move around a weeeeeeeeee bit when we fly :wink:
 

737tdi

Hunter
Joined
May 31, 2006
Messages
2,317
Location
Scurry TX
Something I find cool...I recognize most of the instruments pictured. I'm not talking the HSI or ADI or DME. Engine instruments, ejection handles, various pressure gauges. Although things have changed a lot, things are mostly still the same as when WJ started flying (instrument wise). The "T" is still there, then and today. They may use different inputs, digital v analog, some even fiber optic but still accomplish the same basic flight info.. One thing I found fascinating was the Autopilot on the Hustler. 3 switches is all there were?? You have to pan left to see it. It is about as basic as can be accomplished. Todays autopilots are very advanced, to the point that if you don't want to fly you don't have to. Info. is entered via the CDU as far as route, altitude, climb, turn, and then can be modified by using the mode control panel if you wish to deviate from the route.

I just love looking at older aviation technology and understanding how it works in relation to modern aviation. Incredible leaps in technology have allowed much safer flying and reliability.

I guess some things change but some stay the same. The artificial horizon (ADI) is still just that. The HSI is a fairly modern invention in comparison to the VOR/DME type of instrument. They are still used but are incorporated in multiple ways in other instrumentation.

I know some of y'all fly but most probably have no clue of what I am talking about but it is a very interesting and fun job.

I surely hope you all take a look at some of the visual data that is shown at this website. We should have a contest and see who knows what is what in a cockpit.


Karl
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Richmond Texas USA
Just give me a Gun Sight and a trigger on the stick. Don't need all that other stuff :D :D :D :D Needle ball and airspeed still works :wink:

cockpit+p-51.jpg
 

737tdi

Hunter
Joined
May 31, 2006
Messages
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Location
Scurry TX
WJ: I hate to say but a lot of good men died due to what you are talking about. Lack of navigation instruments, lack of decent instruments for situational awareness. It is so easy to get sucked into flying by sight. I know, you have a gazillion more hours then me but remember, commercial pilots (at least ours) take off with 50 ft. visibility. HGS is a good thing. Most people think it is for landing but is very important for take off. You have much more capability when you are Cat III for take off.

I don't want to get this too far off track of the website. I hope that all the members here get a chance to look and see what the Pilot Veterans dealt with back in the day. It was good but there are multiple instance of flyovers using the instruments of that era.

Karl
 

RugerHound

Hunter
Joined
Jan 9, 2012
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Location
Casa Grande, Arizona
Thanks Karl... That is impressive stuff! I'm not a pilot, but I've had some time in a couple of those aircraft thanks to the USAF! Lots of memories...
 
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Karl,
I was just pulling your chain a weeeeeeeee bit. :D :D
But what has improved the flying in the goo is the radio navigation system. Think ILS, GCA, and GPS approaches. Beats the hell out of the A-N and ADF approaches. The DG and Horz. still do a great job with a good radio, and DME/GPS
Flying the airplane in the clouds is no big deal. As you stated knowing where you are is and has always been the hard part. Think what it had to be like flying out of England with a 1000 Plane raid of bombers. Now add in the retuning RAF and all of the fighters taking off also. Oh yea now they have to land in the goo with battle damage.
How about the guys flying in the Pacific with nothing but a compass and a watch to navigate with. You also had to find a carrier to land on that wasn't where it was when you took off.
The shoot down of Yamamoto is the finest flying and navigation know to man IMHO. Take a look at the indirect route they flew and they still made it to target within 30 seconds of the ETA.
Airlines and other IFR flights could takeoff in 0 vis. in the 60s, but they didn't, they just couldn't land in the US under those conditions. They could in Europe. I took off a lot of times under the hood while in training just by holding runway heading with the Directional Gyro/DG.
 
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