Heads up. Problems with new Ruger 10/22 models.

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pblanc

Bearcat
Joined
Feb 25, 2015
Messages
7
In early August Ruger announced the release of two new 10/22 budget models that it calls "optic ready". The models are 31139 and 31145. These are said to represent a limited production run. These models come with a new molded synthetic stock, light grey for the 31139 and charcoal for the 31145. I believe these stocks have also been made available for sale separately by Ruger. The stock is somewhat like a Sporter wood stock in that there is molded checkering at the pistol grip area and the fore-end, and there is no step off at the front and no barrel band. The problem I encountered was with a model 31139. But exactly the same issue has now been documented on rimfire central with one other model 31139 and four separate 31145 models.

In all six of these rifles, removing the barreled action from the stock as directed in the owner's manual rendered the trigger assembly group non-functional. In my case it did so twice. The first time I removed the barreled action from the stock, the safety no longer had any positive detents, and the cocked hammer could not be released by the trigger. Since I had not encountered this issue before, it took me some time and research to figure it out. The problem was that the safety lever, when centered, had become rotated to a position in which it was inoperative, and would not allow the sear extension clearance for the sear to release the hammer. Unfortunately, when this occurs, the safety lever often cannot be simply rotated back into the correct orientation without using some narrow, thin tool to press in on the little detent ball that holds the safety lever in the "on" and "off" positions. And to do that complete or near complete disassembly of the trigger group is required.

So the first time this happened I chaulked it up to a fluke, fixed the trigger assembly, and returned the barreled action to the stock. As I did so I noticed that the perfectly centered safety lever was actually pushing the sides of the cut out in the synthetic stock that it had to pass through apart to get through. Armed with this knowledge, I removed the barreled action again the relieve the sides of the cut out with a file. I did so as carefully as possible but nonetheless the safety lever got rotated again requiring another disassembly and reassembly. I measured the width of the cut out with a caliper and found it to be about .125" narrower than the same cut out on a birch carbine stock and a synthetic (barrel band) carbine stock, and about that much narrower than the width of the safety cylinder itself.

What happened with these six rifles is that removing the barreled action from the stock by centering the safety and pulling up on the barrel in front of the fore-end pinches the safety cylinder in the stock cut out securely enough that the safety is rotated in a direction counter to the direction the barreled action rotates in.

If anyone has purchased one of these models and not yet removed the barreled action, the first time you do so to use the following procedure. First, uncock the hammer by dry firing. The safety lever might get rotated whether the hammer is cocked or not, but if it does with the hammer cocked and you have to disassemble the trigger group to fix it, at least you won't have to drive out the hammer pin against the force of the hammer spring. The carefully center the safety with your fingers and try to remove the barreled action in as vertical direction as possible by pushing up on the trigger guard as you pull up on the receiver with your fingers. As soon as you get the barreled action out, carefully check the safety lever to see if it has lost its positive detents. If it has, it probably got rotated in a counter-clockwise direction looking at the trigger assembly from the right side. Immediately try to rotate the safety cylinder back in the opposite counter-clockwise direction. If it has not rotated too far, it may turn back freely. If it has rotated all the way over so that the detent ball is now pressing on the flat step cut out for the sear extension, you will probably have to disassemble the trigger group to fix it.

If you successfully get the barreled action out, use a caliper (if you have one) to measure the width of the safety cylinder and the width of the cut out that it has to pass through in the stock. The cut out needs to have a width of at least .900" for the safety to clear. If it is less, relieve the cut out with files and sandpaper before you reassemble the rifle.
 

pblanc

Bearcat
Joined
Feb 25, 2015
Messages
7
It looks like I should have posted this in the rimfire subforum. Moderator please move it there if possible.
 

Hondo44

Hawkeye
Joined
Apr 3, 2009
Messages
7,715
pblanc said:
It looks like I should have posted this in the rimfire subforum. Moderator please move it there if possible.

pblanc,

Excellent write up and thanks for sharing your discovery, the problem, and solution! Don't hesitate to email it to Ruger on their website in the "contact us" option.
 
Joined
Mar 24, 2006
Messages
3,761
I have build a lot of 10/22 rifles and that problem is common in all models with a tight Rubber stock if you don't center the safety in the trigger housing.
As a matter of fact if you pinch both sides of the safety with your fingers and rotate it forward you can lock the gun up. Friction plain and simple.

On hogue rubber stocks that are tight just remove a small amount of material on both sides of the stock. The first time I locked one up I will admit it had me in a tizzy.
Not Rugers fault in my opinion it is the stock and the person taking it apart, it is not model specific you can do it on ANY 10/22.
JMHO
Terry

Couple of pictures on replacing a safety and the tool mentioned above that makes it alot easier.

1sDAb6Th.jpg


LhgCM5Lh.jpg


66XHKykh.jpg
 

pblanc

Bearcat
Joined
Feb 25, 2015
Messages
7
Hondo44 said:
pblanc said:
It looks like I should have posted this in the rimfire subforum. Moderator please move it there if possible.

pblanc,

Excellent write up and thanks for sharing your discovery, the problem, and solution! Don't hesitate to email it to Ruger on their website in the "contact us" option.
Thank you. I have notified Ruger of the problem both through the "contact us" option on the website, and by phoning customer support. The lady I spoke to at CS was very pleasant. I let her know that I was not asking Ruger to do anything about this, as I had already modified the stock and fixed the trigger group. She said that this was the first time she had personally heard about this problem, but would pass the info on to the appropriate people. We will see what happens.
 

pblanc

Bearcat
Joined
Feb 25, 2015
Messages
7
T.A. WORKMAN said:
I have build a lot of 10/22 rifles and that problem is common in all models with a tight Rubber stock if you don't center the safety in the trigger housing.
As a matter of fact if you pinch both sides of the safety with your fingers and rotate it forward you can lock the gun up. Friction plain and simple.

On hogue rubber stocks that are tight just remove a small amount of material on both sides of the stock. The first time I locked one up I will admit it had me in a tizzy.
Not Rugers fault in my opinion it is the stock and the person taking it apart, it is not model specific you can do it on ANY 10/22.
JMHO
Terry

Couple of pictures on replacing a safety and the tool mentioned above that makes it alot easier.

1sDAb6Th.jpg


LhgCM5Lh.jpg


66XHKykh.jpg

In my case, the safety was perfectly centered before trying to remove the action. After I removed it I measured the width of the cut out that the safety has to pass through with a caliper and the width was about .800" or less. The width of the safety measures .900" or a few thousands more, so there is no way it was going to pass through without a great deal of friction even if perfectly centered. I have a black synthetic stock that came with a carbine model (with barrel band) and the cut out on that stock measured .900" in width. That of a birch carbine stock measured slightly greater in width, around .925".

The tool looks like a handy device for those who wish to remove the safety cylinder completely for some reason. If I understand its function correctly, I do not think it would have helped to rotate my safety lever back into position. That is because the cylinder had rotated more than 90 degrees. When that happens the "flat" that ordinarily faces up and accommodates the downward extension of the sear gets "captured" by the safety spring and detent ball. At that point, pushing on the top of the safety cylinder will not apply any pressure to the detent to push it back in. I found that I could depress the safety detent with a thin, narrow blade applied directly to the detent ball of the safety. But to allow access required removing the hammer and the trigger/disconnect/sear assembly.
 
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