Blackhawk with worn hand

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Teddydogno1

Single-Sixer
Joined
May 10, 2013
Messages
220
Another gentleman was examining an OM .357 Blackhawk that I was selling and he said that my pistol has a worn hand (he called it the cylinder pawl) and that it was so worn that it made it hard to install the cylinder. I have a photo he sent me of the supposedly worn hand but it doesn't look obviously problematic to me. Why would a worn hand cause a problem with reinstalling the cylinder? I would think the opposite. I have owned this OM for nearly 10 years, but never fired it. It is NOT a pristine example. It is very smooth in rotation and I did notice that when the cylinder is spun, it barely "clicks" at all.

How does this sound to you? Is this something that is known about Blackhawks? I've never heard of it before, but my revolver collecting is more toward S&W revovlers and my Rugers are shooters. Any thoughts are welcome.

ruger_om357_hand_sm.jpg


Rob
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
25,645
Location
Lake Lure NC USA
Welcome to the Forum.
From what I see,,, it looks ok to me. It sounds like more of a case where the buyer was trying to get a lower price,,,,!
If it is bad,, then a replacement isn't expensive & easily replaced.
 

ADP3

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 23, 2001
Messages
485
Location
SC
Just a thought but did he have the hammer at half-cock when he was installing the cylinder or did he have it at rest?

Best Regards,
ADP3
 

Hondo44

Hawkeye
Joined
Apr 3, 2009
Messages
8,061
Location
People's Republik of California
That is a line of complete horse pucky! Either intentionally or your potential buyer lacks knowledge of single actions. The pawl in the pic is perfect looking although I can't see the 2nd notch. But if that pic was supposed to show the wear, it does not. If the clicks were barely audible as you said, that's a factor of spring tension, possibly a mis-installed spring. Lighter but adequate tension does not affect proper performance. In fact I prefer lighter spring tension.

But there's only one 'acid' test for a worn or 'bad' cyl pawl (hand); if the cyl doesn't "follow up". That means timing; the pawl doesn't turn the cyl far enough to lock into position by the time the hammer clicks into full cock. If the cyl locks into position after the hammer cocks, the timing is a little 'late' and caused by a worn pawl (too short), worn cyl notches or both.

If the cyl has very late lock-up or doesn't lock-up at all even with hammer pulled back as far as it will go, THEN it's time for gunsmithing.

Worn pawls do not make it harder to install the cyl and just as you said if anything, it would be easier because the sharp edges are worn off!
 

Teddydogno1

Single-Sixer
Joined
May 10, 2013
Messages
220
Thanks, guys. He is actually shipping the gun back to me, but not really because of this. Somehow I missed noticing that a previous owner had drilled and tapped the top strap for a scope mount! That is totally my fault and costing me nearly $100 in shipping and dealer fees. It is the first time I've EVER sold a gun and messed up the description and had the gun returned.

Rob
 

Randomguy

Bearcat
Joined
Aug 19, 2012
Messages
69
Teddydogno1 said:
Thanks, guys. He is actually shipping the gun back to me, but not really because of this. Somehow I missed noticing that a previous owner had drilled and tapped the top strap for a scope mount! That is totally my fault and costing me nearly $100 in shipping and dealer fees. It is the first time I've EVER sold a gun and messed up the description and had the gun returned.

Rob


Ouch! I would send it back too based on the drilled top strap. Your hand looks fine.
 
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