Another handgun reloading question....

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As I mentioned in the other thread, I have been reloading .41 Mag for years. I'm no expert, but I have followed all the rules and so far no issues with any of my loads. My die set is a carbide three die set from RCBS that has worked well. My question is when I finish a round, the case walls are not straight, you can see where the base of the bullet is in the case. There is a slight bulge there that continues to the crimp, almost as if the case was resized too much, or the bullet is slightly larger than it should be. Is this cause for alarm? I've had no issues of any kind, it just looks a little weird since new rounds always have a straight case with no variance.

It has been a while since I've done much shooting or reloading (have moved too many times!), but I am looking to start again if I can find components (primers and powder). Thus the questions........
 

dannyd

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The only way to get rid of that is with a Redding Duel Ring sizing die, but they don't make one for 41 magnum.

If you look at almost any reloaded rounds you will see that to some extent. Definitely not a problem to shoot just looks.
 

Cholo

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Nearly all, if not all, of my revolver reloads have that bulge. I also use RCBS dies. I'm about to load 200 357's for the 20th time and then the brass will be retired. The bulge hasn't effected the case life, though NikA is correct in that theoretically it could shorten case life.

One thing's for sure, our cases have one hell of a grip on those bullets LOL
 
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Length of bullet shank may not be compatible with internal case shape.
I had issues when loading Federal 147 HST bullets in non-Federal cases. A LEE factory crimp die (?) did the trick but I sort of wonder what it does to the bullet base when it smushed the case straight again. Better solution: use only FEDERAL cases for those bullets.
 

Ka6otm

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"They won't fix what the OP is posting about though."
They did on my 9mm loads.
So you're saying the Lee FCD took out the hourglass shape from the case? The only way that could happen is if it squeezed the bullet in on all sides and thus elongated the bullet. Is that what happened? If so, was it a lead bullet, not jacketed or plated.
 

noahmercy

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If you are loading for only one firearm, a way to eliminate the "wasp waist" and also extend the life of the brass is to neck size only. By running the case into the sizing die just as far as the bullet protrudes into it, neck tension is maintained, but the rest of the case is not being swaged down and then blown back out during firing. I have also loaded my most accurate ammunition this way, as the cases have been fireformed to the chambers and hold the bullet in alignment better than a loose-fitting cartridge.

Mind you, this is really only applicable to rimmed revolver cartridges. And on magnum rounds, after a couple firings, they will need to be full length sized due to being tough to extract and near impossible to get back into the chambers.
 
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Thank you. Good info, I think I will try this. I was going to get a Lee Factory Crimp die to try, but this may be a better idea to try. I load very few full bore loads, preferring to use factory ammo for hunting. It will be interesting to see how this works.

As I said earlier, there are no issues with the "wasp waist" loads, they just look strange and I wondered how much the brass was being 'worked' by totally resizing, then blowing back out.....

I have only reloaded .41 Mag, so I'm good with trying this. They are a fairly long case, so it should work to just resize to the depth of the bullet I use. I may make a bushing to set the depth so I am resizing the 'neck' consistently. I mostly use the same bullet as well as the same revolver.
 

Cholo

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turd, you're not overworking your brass. Right now I'm taking a short break from loading 70's nickel 357 brass for the 20th time and I havn't even had so much as a single split case mouth. They have not been loaded hot. On every single one of the 150 I just loaded I can see the outline of the bullet in the brass, that bulge you're talking about.

I think neck sizing straight walled handgun brass is providing a solution to a non existent problem.

Why not call up the company that makes your bullets and see if they recommend neck sizing 41 Magnum brass?

My 2¢.
 
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Cholo - yeah, I know. I'm just bored and looking for something to do. This kind of interests me, so...... The same with trimming them. I'm going to do it once, just to see if there is any difference in length, not because I need to. I'm retired, it is cold out, we have about 2 feet of snow covering everything. It has been a number of years and three complete interstate moves since I have reloaded for my .41s, and I am still looking for some of my 'stuff' to get going again.
 

OM41

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With me it was a bulge like the OP stated, loading plated bullets, it wasn't many but at least one would not chamber, all were put thru a Lee FCD, all chambered and fired.
 

kmoore

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I never counted how many times any of the handgun brass I load has been reloaded. I am only loading 9mm, 40 S&W, 38spl, 357 and 45 auto rim at range practice power. The nickel cases finally neck split, or the nickel is worn off them and they get tossed.
 

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