10/22 scope recommendations for longer ranges.

Help Support Ruger Forum:

guht

Bearcat
Joined
Aug 21, 2009
Messages
4
Looking for a lower end model leupold scope or something of that quality good for longer ranges and zeroing in at 100yds on a new ruger 10/22 black synthetic stock with blued barrel from cabelas.

Will mostly be shooting from standing position or prone with a bipod.

Budget for scope is between 150-300$ for new or used.

Also looking for mount and ring recommendations for the scope. I would prefer to use the stock mounting holes for the scope so I can avoid any gunsmithing.

Thanks! :)
 

LarryH

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 15, 2008
Messages
162
Location
Ca. But heart is in Colorado!
I have a few 10/22s that I am using a Mueller APV scope on. The APV is a variable 4.5-14X Variable Objective scope that comes highly recommended over at RimfireCentral.com. Here's a link to the Mueller site. http://www.muelleroptics.com/products/MAPV451440.html
Runs a little below what you want to spend even!
I use a variety of mounts and rings but like the Burris Signature Z rings and the "DedNutz" one piece ring/mount. Either one is great. The Z rings because they are adjustable MOA scope rings with various size tube inserts to help get rid of any "droop" issues that your 10/22 might have.
Check them out, you won't be sorry.
LarryH
 

Old Coach

Bearcat
Joined
Aug 12, 2006
Messages
38
Location
WNC Mtns
Mueller has a new scope just out that is great on a 22.
It is 8X32 with tactical knobs and is on sale for $210 shipped.
I put one on a CZ bolt 22 and love it.
Very clear at 32X for a $200 scope.
Best bang for the buck right now.
Ck out Rimfirecentral in the scope section for reviews.

Coach
 

Snake45

Hawkeye
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
6,120
Location
+4020
Whatever you get, make sure it has Adjustable Objective or you won't be happy with it when you find out what parallax is and how much it can screw up .22 shooting.

I'm not kidding. For a .22, I'd rather have a cheap scope with AO than a top-of-the-line name brand without it.
 

mattsbox99

Hunter
Joined
Jan 12, 2009
Messages
3,391
Location
Montana 'Merica
Leupold does make a 2-7x32 for rimfires that you may find on clearance some where as they are being updated. I have one on one of my 10/22s and it is an excellent scope. I wish the crosshairs were a little heavier though.
 

wwb

Hunter
Joined
Nov 18, 2004
Messages
2,787
Location
wisconsin
For a target-only .22, I have a bull-barrel Savage with a cheap (about $110) Simmons 4-12 X 40 AO. Works like a champ. No good for a hunting scope, though.... there, I have a 60's vintage 10/22 with an equally old Bushnell fixed 2.5X.
 

guht

Bearcat
Joined
Aug 21, 2009
Messages
4
Thanks for all the replies! Your responses raise an additional question though.

The last poster mentioned that one of their scopes was good for target shooting, but not for hunting. Whats the difference and considerations between the two uses?

Im not much of a hunter, but Id like to think in an extreme situation that my target skills and rig would not let me starve at night! ;-)
 
A

Anonymous

I'd say the main difference between the "target" scope and the "hunting" scope would be quick acquisition of the sight on the critter that suddenly pops up close range when ya least expect it. (like a red fox that recently rushed me and stopped at 10 yards when I was mouse squeaking a bunch of crows that couldn't spot me below the foilage I was under)

Bigger field of view etc. on lower powers.

I use a 3-12X40 and keep it dialed down to 3x until a longer range shot presents itsself.

Hunting, I never take a shot beyond 50 yds with a .22 to insure a clean kill as the MPBR is about 85 yds with the lil' .22 and it'll probably be buffeting at that point if you are using supersonic ammo, as it is slowing down below the sound barrirer and affecting accuracy. Also the loss of muzzle energy at that range has to be taken into account.

Paper punching is a different story though.

+1 on an adjustable objective as most rimfire scopes are factory set parallax free @ 50 yds. Out past that you will definately want an A.O.
 

guht

Bearcat
Joined
Aug 21, 2009
Messages
4
Thanks for the good info fancypicker.

Is there a scope that acts as a good go between with an AO for target and hunting?

This scope seems to advertise itself as such, but it doesnt seem to state specifically that it has an AO.

http://www.muelleroptics.com/products/MAPV451440.html

Also, when mounting would I want a low, medium, or high mount? Whats the difference?

Thanks for all the info!
 

Snake45

Hawkeye
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
6,120
Location
+4020
guht":1osbofqk said:
This scope seems to advertise itself as such, but it doesnt seem to state specifically that it has an AO.
Yes, it's AO. Many shooters at Rimfirecentral.com love this scope.
 
A

Anonymous

Also, when mounting would I want a low, medium, or high mount? Whats the difference?

The closer you can get your objective lens to the barrel's centerline the better, so the lowest rings (mount) possible are the best.

That being said, The scope you are looking at hase a 40MM objective lens so probably medium is the smallest you will get away with.
 

wwb

Hunter
Joined
Nov 18, 2004
Messages
2,787
Location
wisconsin
An adjustable objective scope is not the best choice for hunting - especially if you're going after animals that could show up at nearly any distance, and will be on the move. Unless the scope is set for the range at which the target appears, the image will be blurry.... and the greater the discrepancy between setting and actual range, the blurrier it gets.

If you want to make the gun do dual-duty, get a Leupold QD base, two sets of Leupold QD rings, and two scopes. The Leupold mounts will hold their zero within an inch at 100 yards, and once they are both zeroed, you can switch from one scope to another in seconds.
 

Snake45

Hawkeye
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
6,120
Location
+4020
wwb":ruszigui said:
Unless the scope is set for the range at which the target appears, the image will be blurry.... and the greater the discrepancy between setting and actual range, the blurrier it gets.
Oh, it will not. AO doesn't change the focus of the image, all it does is put the image and the reticle in the same focal plane so that they don't move in relation to each other.

I've used various AO scopes on my .22s for years at ranges from 50 feet to 125 yards and have never had a target out of focus after I've adjusted the eyepiece.

For hunting, just set the AO to your most likely hunting distance--40 yards or 50 or 75 or whatever and forget about it. You'll be just fine.
 
A

Anonymous

AO doesn't change the focus of the image, all it does is put the image and the reticle in the same focal plane so that they don't move in relation to each other

What he said.

For hunting, just set the AO to your most likely hunting distance--40 yards or 50 or 75 or whatever and forget about it. You'll be just fine.

Snake is correct, but there are a few more steps to it.

1. Adjust magnification.
2. Adjust objective lens to most likely hunting/exact target range.
3. Adjust fast focus eyepiece to focus image.
4. Aim.
5. Squeeeeeeeeeeze.
6. Hope for a bang.
 

guht

Bearcat
Joined
Aug 21, 2009
Messages
4
Thanks for all the helpful info!

I went with the Mueller 4.5-14x40AO APV, which seems like a good all purpose scope at a nice price point!

I also chose the deadnutz medium mount.

I should get it all this week and hope to be out playing by the weekend! ;-)

Thanks again, and Ill post back my results!
 

wwb

Hunter
Joined
Nov 18, 2004
Messages
2,787
Location
wisconsin
Snake45":1qbhc9ih said:
.....I've used various AO scopes on my .22s for years at ranges from 50 feet to 125 yards and have never had a target out of focus after I've adjusted the eyepiece........

Note the italics. Having to adjust the eyepiece is no different than having to adjust the yardage on the AO. Also, note step #4 form the post by fancypicker. A non-AO scope, although parallax-free at a specific distance, requires NO focusing adjustment of any sort - if it's a quick shot hunting situation, one thing you certainly don't need is to focus the scope... regardless of whether it's the eyepiece or the yardage.

If your eye is dead center behind the scope, there is no parallax error, no matter the range.... and, unless your eye is nearly to the edge of the exit pupil, and at long range (since the error is determined as an angular error) the error is insignificant.
 

Snake45

Hawkeye
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
6,120
Location
+4020
wwb":1zvrl45l said:
Snake45":1zvrl45l said:
.....I've used various AO scopes on my .22s for years at ranges from 50 feet to 125 yards and have never had a target out of focus after I've adjusted the eyepiece........

Note the italics. Having to adjust the eyepiece is no different than having to adjust the yardage on the AO. Also, note step #4 form the post by fancypicker. A non-AO scope, although parallax-free at a specific distance, requires NO focusing adjustment of any sort - if it's a quick shot hunting situation, one thing you certainly don't need is to focus the scope... regardless of whether it's the eyepiece or the yardage.
The italics were to emphasize that focus comes from the eyepiece, NOT from the objective lens. ALL scopes, regardless of AO or not, must have their eyepiece lens focused to the individual user. This needs only be done ONCE for each shooter and the eyepiece can then be left alone. I disagree with the poster who put that as step #4. It should have been step #1, and it only has to be done once. The only time I ever have to mess with my eyepiece is if I decide to switch to using the scope while wearing corrective glasses, or not.

If your eye is dead center behind the scope, there is no parallax error, no matter the range.... and, unless your eye is nearly to the edge of the exit pupil, and at long range (since the error is determined as an angular error) the error is insignificant.
You are correct on the first part, if your eye is in exactly the same place every time, you will have no parallax error. Unless your stock fits you exceptionally well, though, this is very difficult to achieve.

And I disagree that the error is insignificant. It can be quite significant. I had yet another example of this last week. My son and I were shooting one of my rifles (a CF) with a big-game (non-AO) scope with the parallax set probably at 150 yards or so. We were shooting at 50 yards just to get it on the paper and test some ammo. The gun's stock is NOT set up for scope, and kind of leaves your head "floating" when using the scope (it's an M14 type rifle). He and I both shot nice groups, but the centers of our groups were more than two inches apart because we had our eyes in different places when shooting (we were shooting from a bench so hold, stance, etc. were not factors). I don't call a 2" discrepancy at 50 yards (4 MOA) an "insignificant" error; do you?
 
A

Anonymous

fancypicker":2tbp36f5 said:
1. Adjust magnification.
2. Adjust objective lens to most likely hunting/exact target range.
3. Adjust fast focus eyepiece to focus image.
4. Aim.
5. Squeeeeeeeeeeze.
6. Hope for a bang.

Snake45":2tbp36f5 said:
I disagree with the poster who put that as step #4
:shock:
Hmmmm ... I do kinda like to aim before I shoot.
:lol:
 

Snake45

Hawkeye
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
6,120
Location
+4020
fancypicker":1nn13uob said:
fancypicker":1nn13uob said:
1. Adjust magnification.
2. Adjust objective lens to most likely hunting/exact target range.
3. Adjust fast focus eyepiece to focus image.
4. Aim.
5. Squeeeeeeeeeeze.
6. Hope for a bang.

Snake45":1nn13uob said:
I disagree with the poster who put that as step #4
:shock:
Hmmmm ... I do kinda like to aim before I shoot.
:lol:
Well, shoot, I just took the other guy's word for it. My point is, you focus the eyepiece first, about ten seconds after you get the scope mounted, and then you leave it alone and forget about it. Then you go on with all the other steps. :wink:
 

Latest posts

Top