The Past

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Joined
Oct 26, 2006
Messages
9,483
Location
Woodbury, Tn
Thanks a lot guys! Now I am officially old? I remembered all but the Blackjack gum. We had something else-I can’t remember the name, but was a pink pack, and made you dance funny?
gramps
 
Joined
Nov 17, 2009
Messages
10,554
Location
Webster, MD.
Coop said:
DPris said:
When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's amore.
Dean Martin. :)
Denis
nope It was Perry Como - 1955
"That's Amore" is a 1953 song by composer Harry Warren[1] and lyricist Jack Brooks.[1] It became a major hit and signature song for Dean Martin in 1953. Amore (pronounced [aˈmoːre]) means "love" in Italian.
 

Rancher Will

Blackhawk
Joined
Oct 10, 2010
Messages
748
Location
North Colorado
I remember candle lamps in the cow camps, made from empty tomato cans with a cross-cut side, with a candle in it.

Razor Strops (I still have mine) used to touch-up the straight razor (I still have mine) before shaving.

Coal oil lamps with asbestos wicks (we still have two in each home).

Coal oil hurricane lanterns to light the barn while we milked the cows before daylight every morning and after dark evenings, as we milked sitting on a one-leg milking stool.

Windshield wipers in the truck that worked with a little handle, above the windshield, that the driver turned with one hand while steering with the other.

A five gallon can sitting on the right side floor of the truck, with burning charcoal for heat while driving in the winter.

Turning off the gasoline valve under the dash of a model A Ford when shutting off the engine, to keep all the gas from draining out of the tank while the car is parked for the night.

Holding your thumb against the side of your fingers while cranking a tractor or truck engine to keep from breaking the thumb when the engine recoiled the crank.

The hand-crank DE Laval separator that was used to separate the cream from the milk after milking the cows every morning and evening.

The red and white checked oil cloth table cloth in the kitchen of every farm house.

Bringing a pail of water into the house from the windmill well to keep the water tank full on the kitchen range.

Taking a bath, in the laundry wash tub, on the kitchen floor, every Saturday night, before going to church Sunday Morning.

Ordering the correct, Printed Pattern Feed Sacks, at the Elevator when buying feed, so the farm wife would have the matching patterns for making shirts.

Setting up the home made Quilting Frame in the house so the farm wife and her neighbor ladies could make a new bed quilt from rages that had been saved.

Hanging the draft horse harness in proper order on the wall pegs behind each horse stall in the barn so the harness could be slipped on and over the horse without tangle each morning.

I could list a lot more. But, if you remember these you must be as old as my wife and me.
 
Joined
Sep 1, 2003
Messages
5,576
Location
Richmond Texas USA
Fox Mike said:
That is scary I remember ALL of them.

I also had a car with a radio. . .AM only. You also could order a car without a radio.

You could also order one without a heater.

Windshield wipers that went slower if you sped up.

Today push button start is the thing. My '49 Ford was a push button. Turn the key, pull the choke out half way and mash the push button.

Wing windows.

Remember tire sizes. 670-15, 710-15, 760-15 There were NO radials then.

I wonder how many people here have actually used a 'chamber pot', an out house (porta-pots do not count), cooked on or heated with a wood or coal stove

How many know what a .25 cent cake of ice is and what it was used for.

How many scoured the ditches for returnable bottles so you could get the cash for them?

In the 50s my Grandparents lived in a small town in Ohio.
I would not spend the night with them because they still had an OUTHOUSE and I was afraid I would have to use the 'chamber pot' during the night. Oh by the way that outhouse is cold in winter Ohio. :wink: The reason you faced the outhouse East when possible was to get the morning sun. The only water they had in the house was from a hand pump in the kitchen.
Yep picked up a bunch of bottles. Small .02, large .05 and the wood case .75.
My 53 Ford had 670-15s, and my 57 Buick had 825-15s.
While on our honeymoon in Miami FL. 1963 we had to buy a new set of 4 recaps for the Buick from Firestone Tire $49.95 for all 4 :D
Even though we had ice delivered I don't recall the .25 cake. Since you couldn't buy a refrigerator after the war we had to use an ice box.
 

Rancher Will

Blackhawk
Joined
Oct 10, 2010
Messages
748
Location
North Colorado
Speaking of "outhouses, does anyone remember the fragrant plant that was often planted around and on the outhouse? There was even a popular song when I was young, with a verse memorializing the plant.

Remember the verse, "So they laid her in the church yard, where the Woodbine doth entwine". From "My Darling Clementine" song.
 

jgt

Blackhawk
Joined
Jul 30, 2008
Messages
847
Location
coleman texas
How about when the milk spoiled in the ice box you poured the curd into a cloth table napkin and hung it on the clothes line to drip. Then break up the curd with a broom handle before bringing in the "cottage cheese" for supper.
 

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
Messages
6,525
Location
Memphis, TN USA
I was talking with my wife about this the other day:

I went to visit my aunt and uncle down near Water Valley, Mississippi. When Sunday morning came I rode to church with them in a mule drawn wagon. At church there was a large oak tree and several wagons and teams were hitched around it. There were tubs of water for the mules.

And at the same church, for a funeral. It was warm weather, the church windows were raised, and lowered from the tip, to allow a breeze through the church. While we sat there quietly, the wind sort of moaned through the pine trees outside the windows.

And later, after the graveside service, we went back inside and heard the cruuump! as the dirt clods thudded against the coffin as the grave was filled in. We stayed inside until the grave was closed, then left.

Bob Wright
 
Joined
Nov 17, 2009
Messages
10,554
Location
Webster, MD.
Rancher Will said:
Speaking of "outhouses, does anyone remember the fragrant plant that was often planted around and on the outhouse?
Then there was the bucket of lye that you put a scoop full into the 'holding tank'. Make sure none got on the seat or the next user would have words for you. . .and a burnt butt.
 

bogus bill

Hunter
Joined
Dec 25, 2009
Messages
3,969
Location
utah
When I was about seven (1948) we drove a 1936 ford coupe from wisconsin to outside of Harrison Ark. No back seat so mom put footstools behind for sister and I. We had friends that had moved down there. The folks drove to church so I and my friend re Pete, their son, rode old Dolly to church. The church had a horse stable.
We sat in sunday school up behind the preacher in the choir seats as the preacher was teaching sunday school to the old folks. I was a stranger and a kid in front of me was gawking at me. That was too much for Repete, who busted his nose! RePetes pa, big Pete seen it, come up and grabbed rePete by the ear and literally carried him down the aisle and out the church without his feet hardly touching the floor. We could hear bad things happening to rePete. Found a picture of that ford. My sister and me.
 

bogus bill

Hunter
Joined
Dec 25, 2009
Messages
3,969
Location
utah
We went to a one room school with a outhouse. Our teacher was said to be the oldest teacher in wisconsin. I recall him bringing his fathers civil war musket to school, (His dad had fought in the civil war) showing us how to load and shoot it. He took us out behind the school and shot it for us at some target! The Brundage boys in the back row drove a model A or about a 1928 chev coupe to school!
I found this old picture on the net. They have my name wrong. First boy on the left in the front row.
 

Colonialgirl

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 7, 2008
Messages
7,894
Location
Wesley Chapel, Florida
Fox Mike said:
That is scary I remember ALL of them.


Windshield wipers that went slower if you sped up.

Today push button start is the thing. My '49 Ford was a push button. Turn the key, pull the choke out half way and mash the push button.

Wing windows.

YUPPERS, 49 Ford Two door Coupe with a straight Six and an Over drive Tranny. (Left window mechanism broke and I use to arrive at school in Portland, Ore with my left side WET on rainy days)



I wonder how many people here have actually used a 'chamber pot', an out house (porta-pots do not count), cooked on or heated with a wood or coal stove


Well ALL of that at my Grandma's house up in Bloomingdale, PA and later at My Aunt's house in the same place

How many know what a .25 cent cake of ice is and what it was used for.

How many scoured the ditches for returnable bottles so you could get the cash for them?

Yuppers, Me and my Older Brother Jimmy use to do that to make a little money for Bubble gum.
 

blackhawknj

Buckeye
Joined
Apr 22, 2010
Messages
1,945
I moved to Vermont in 1956. Our house had an old wall mounted crank telephone-it quickly disappeared-and leaning against the side of a house down the road a high wheel bicycle.
 
Joined
Nov 17, 2009
Messages
10,554
Location
Webster, MD.
This was before the Olds 'spinner' hub caps were installed.
yEH0vVpl.jpg
 

biker50

Bearcat
Joined
Apr 14, 2018
Messages
15
Your post about growing up reminded me of my own childhood, very similar. We didn't have much but it was a good life. The only difference was my father was a cop for the transit system in Boston, at that time called the MTA. He felt if there was a gun in the house I should know about it. He took me to the gun club on Saturdays for years and taught me to shoot. For my 10th birthday he gave me my own gun,( the only birthday present I can ever remember getting) a Smith & Wesson 22/32 kit gun with a round butt. He paid $69 for it and I shot it for years and I still have it and its in the condition as when I got in 1957.
 
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