blackhawk vs super blackhawk

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jpb in me

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Can both revolvers handle the same pressures. I really want a 4 5/8 revolver in either 45LC, 41 or 44 mag. Will the 45LC BH handle hot loads such as buffalo bore ammo 300g at 1125ft p/sec
 

c.r.

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just a few differences

SBH's are only offered in 44 mag

for a 45Colt or any other caliber you will need to go with a BH.
 

jpb in me

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The reason I ask is the new Ruger catalog lists the SBH at $130 dollars more for the same barrel lentght and finish. Only difference being caliber. If those are the only differences wouldn't I be better off getting the BH 45LC convertible giving me more options for the same money?
 

c.r.

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a blued SBH has a steel grip frame and a steel ejector rod housing. the steel grip frame requires more effort to fit to the frame.

a blued BH has an aluminum grip frame and an aluminum ejector rod houseing

i think this is what drives the price difference.

also notice that certain barrel lengths of the SBH will have a different style grip frame (one with a squared back trigger guard)

also SBH has a slightly different hammer
 
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If you reload, you can work with whatever caliber you chose.

The .45 Blackhawk can be had in a convertible model with an extra cylinder chambered in .45 ACP if that's of interest to you. Provides a little more flexibility.

:)
 

bisleyfan41

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The SBH has a steel grip frame and ejector rod housing which adds to the price. The BH has an aluminum alloy grip frame and ejector rod housing. Aluminum is cheaper and saves some weight, but some people like all-steel guns. If the BH were all steel like the SBH, they would be the same price. It boils down to what you want.
 

AzRebel

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jpb in me":2blw1l80 said:
Can both revolvers handle the same pressures. I really want a 4 5/8 revolver in either 45LC, 41 or 44 mag. Will the 45LC BH handle hot loads such as buffalo bore ammo 300g at 1125ft p/sec

I've shot BB 325 gr cast listed at 1325 fps in my Vaquero (same strength as the Blackhawk and Super Blackhawk). They were the only "hunting" ammo I could find when I got to Alaska, so I bought 'em.

An LEO at the range in Fairbanks asked if he could "shoot a couple". I laughed when he shot the first round and said, "Wooo doggie! Them kick!".

They weren't brutal, but they'lll get your attention.

You should have no problems shooting any of the commercially available .45 Colt loads in a BH. The alloy gripframe makes the revolver a bit lighter to carry than a SBH, but will also allow a bit more recoil.

Daryl
 

dougader

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I like the heavy 45 Colt loads in a Bisley revolver. You may be fine with the standard Blackhawk and BB type loads, but my arthritic wrists don't like the added recoil.

The 45 Colt BH is easier to carry because of the lighter weight, but shooting with a Bilsey grip frame - at least for me - makes shooting the heavier loads more tolerable.

So to answer your question, yes, the BH will handle the load you listed. The question is: can you handle it? :)

I load 335 grain WLNGC bullets to 1200 fps in my 5.5" Bisley. Wouldn't want to shoot it in my convertible BH, even though the gun will handle it just fine.
 
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To expound on that just a little . . .

I have a .45 Blackhawk 4-5/8" convert. When firing "snappy" loads I got a little abuse on the knuckle of my middle finger. Never had this with my 7-1/2" gun. Retrofit a Super Blackhawk "dragoon" grip frame onto the Blackhawk, and it made a whole 'nother gun out of it . . . tad bit heavier and a little more handle to get ahold of.

I'm told the Bisley does something similar, but with a different grip angle altogether.

;)
 

jpb in me

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Well I'm glad I asked. the heavier SBH would probably make quite a difference in shooting comfort which is definitely something to consider.
Thanks
 

Sharp Shooter

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jpb in me":h8f5deqq said:
The reason I ask is the new Ruger catalog lists the SBH at $130 dollars more for the same barrel lentght and finish. Only difference being caliber. If those are the only differences wouldn't I be better off getting the BH 45LC convertible giving me more options for the same money?

I'm one of those weird guys who prefers the .41 Magnum to either the .45 Colt or the .44 Magnum. But to answer your question, "caliber" is not the only difference between a SBH and a BH. Without getting into steel frames vs. alloy frames, differnent barrel lengths, triggers, hammers, etc., I can tell you all 4 of my fingers fit on the grip frame of a SBH, but my pinky finger hang goes underneath a regular BH grip frame. For me personally, that makes a SBH somewhat easier shooting with full house loads.
However, I'm not saying I prefer SBHs. I don't even own a SBH anymore - I've had a couple of them. I have a stainless BH .45LC now. I like it, but I seldom shoot those wrist wrenching, 300-grain powerhouse loads in it. When I do, my old right wrist scolds me for a week afterwards.
You should probably compare a SBH side-by-side with a BH job in me. It's hard to tell the differences by just looking at a catalog. :D
Oh, one more thing - building your own ammo (handloading) provides you with a lot of options for different types of ammo too, and you don't even need an extra cylinder for your gun.
 

BearHawk 357

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I would guess that a non-fluted cylinder may be slightly stronger than a fluted cylinder (but not by much). So, perhaps the SBH is a tad more robust in that regard.

Also, a SBH Hunter has a heavy barrel with the top portion of the barrel profile being fairly hefty. Perhaps this feature, on the Hunter SBH, makes that particular model the strongest.

You would be well suited with either of the two choices that you have presented. Both of these guns are among some of the strongest in the industry (if not THE strongest).
 
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The non-fluted cylinder on the Super is really a styling feature that adds a little weight to the gun. The rib on the top of the Hunter barrel is there to provide a place to mount a 'scope. It really adds no usable strength. It does, however, also add a little weight. The Super's steel grip frame (7-1/2" models) also adds weight.

Increased weigh helps with stability and recoil absorption.

:)
 

jpb in me

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Well part of my thinking is that with the convertable I could shoot the less expensive 45 apc and load the heavy stuff for deer hunting/woods carry. Do any of you know if the point of aim would be fairly close to the heavy 45LC vs the 45 acp. Close enough that I wouldn't have to shoot the heavy loads until called for during hunting.
 

BearHawk 357

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It's going to vary from gun-to-gun. Most people end up toying around with handloads until they find a good combo. Where do you live? I know where there is a near-mint (but used) 45 colt - 45 acp convertible, in NE Ohio, for sale, for $400 OTD. I thought about getting it myself.

You can't go wrong with one.
 

JHRosier

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The real thumpers aren't a lot of fun to shoot in a 4-5/8" barrel.
They will shoot well, if you can take the abuse.
The 45 Colt does not need as much pressure as the 44 mag to generate the same amount of muzzle energy.
A 4-5/8" 45 Colt Blackhawk will shoot as heavy a safe load as you will be willing to tolerate.
I have both the 44 mag and 45 Colt in 4-5/8" and get better results from the 44 mag, although either are easily good enough for any practical use, shooting around 1-1/2" 5 shot groups at 25 yards.

Jack
 
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