Yesterday was one of "those days"

Help Support Ruger Forum:

Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
6,896
I'll preface this with: I'm neither whining nor asking for sympathy.
Son had been gone on an 8 day trip with his spouse, got home Saturday night, and expected(as usual) that everything he wanted to do would fall into place like balls on a pool table. When he left, we had 3 disfunctional tractors-- one waiting on an ordered part, one that was put away last summer with an electrical issue, and one he'd loaned out and left dead in the borrower's field 4 hours later. I was not able to resolve any of those issues while he was away which didn't help anything at all.
We had a few acres of corn to plant for a customer which doesn't seem to be a problem except for the fact that we'd never planted corn with the planter we bought 6 years ago. Since I'd not had much experience with John Deere planters, I had no basis to work from. Yesterday morning we switched the seed meters from soybeans to corn--simple enough. Went to the field and stuff started going wrong. Seems there's a little synthetic rubber seed delivery belt thing-a-ma-bob in there that apparently doesn't like sitting in storage for years at a time. Being the packrat he is, Son had a whole stack of spare meters(all of which had been sitting for years-keep this in mind) so he sent for those (35 mile round trip). When they arrived in what seemed like hours, it wasn't a direct replacement swap. Both units had to be dismantled, parts swapped, one re-assembled, and remounted onto the planter. First one(keep this in mind) took about 15 minutes. Good to go?? NO.
Over the next 3 hours, 7 of those little rubber belt thingies broke which breaks the plastic gear drive and requires another sequence to replace(some of them broke a second time). We did get much faster at changing parts and DIL timed us at 5 minutes after we'd practiced some. By the time we'd planted about 5 acres, we ran out of salvage parts and it was getting dark so we gave up.
Someone is headed for a JD parts counter this morning.
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
21,018
When I have "one of those days," I try to get to a stopping point,, and call it a day & not do anything else,, knowing things just won't fall into place. At least I TRY to do that.
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2014
Messages
1,446
Sounds a little like whining about bad timing of the mechanical lesson. The best ones always involve bad timing.
Used to have a hockey coach who always said " you want sympathy, look it up, it's just another word in the dictionary somewhere between S#$% and syphilis" He had a way with words.
Look at the bright side, in a few days you'll have some new parts for backup.....
 

Fox Mike

Hawkeye
Joined
Nov 17, 2009
Messages
9,986
Having 'turned a wrench' most of my life I can understand the frustration. What Contender said is what I have done on numerous occasions. Sometimes just 'stop and step away' for a few minutes is the best solution.
 

Jeepnik

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 16, 2005
Messages
5,229
No matter what your endeavor in life stuff happens. I once drove fro L A to Bakersfield one evening so I could start a job first thing in the AM. Midnight I woke up realizing I left a critical part home. So I did a round to L A Not much sleep that night.

Had a good laugh but learned to triple check materials before leaving on a distant trip.
 

turd

Blackhawk
Joined
Jan 8, 2012
Messages
712
Farmers (and I have known many of them) are the most capable fix it people in the world. They always find a way to get it done. My FIL kept a pliers in his pocket, a multi-tool in a scabbard on his belt and some wire in the back of the pickup. I've seen him fix or at least bubba so many broken things it is still hard to believe. He's gone, but I will never forget him telling me that whenever you think you have something figured out, double the time you think it will take to do it. Then if it takes less time, you won one.
 

Selena

Hunter
Joined
Sep 13, 2013
Messages
2,773
Count your blessings... at least you don't have my Dad looking over your shoulder saying how easy it was to just to change planter plates.
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
6,896
Better day today. DIL did the parts run early and by the time the parts were on-site, I had most of the old parts removed and ready to install new. Planter was running by 11AM and finished, moved home, and parked inside by 5PM.
I got a chuckle from Selena's comment since somewhere around 1980 I switched from a 'plate planter' to a central feed, air delivery (AKA Cyclo) planter which Dad said "IT'LL NEVER WORK".
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
6,896
"Add duct tape and a crescent wrench and you have a complete tool kit."
Gotta have 'zip ties' to complete the baling wire/duct tape repair kit.
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2014
Messages
1,446
Don't forget the old AC buzz box welder and some coat hangers or 30 year old mystery rusty welding rod to splatter over the 4 tubes of broken JB Weld spread on whatever POS they tried to "repair"
I've seen lots of farmer "repair" jobs in my working life, no offense meant to farmers but a lot of em suck when it comes to maintenance.
I understand the emergency patch up before dark, rain, snow, whatever, sometimes needs to be done.
They do get points for creativity! I really should have done a scrap book of photos over the years.
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
6,896
^^^MOST CERTAINLY.
I've seen a bunch of those 'field expedient repairs' still in place years later. That's one of the downsides of buying second hand equipment but one learns where to look for such shortcuts. One old baler I bought for parts had the 'baling wire' covered with J-B weld. Previous cobbler hadn't even bothered to remove the wire and clean the area before slathering on the J-B.
 

Fox Mike

Hawkeye
Joined
Nov 17, 2009
Messages
9,986
Don't knock JB Weld. Years ago at Weide AAF we had a carburetor on a TUG that leaked air/fuel. New gasket didn't solve the problem. Seems someone at some time had gouged the intake so the gasket wouldn't seal. We, my cohort in crime and I, slathered both sides of the gasket with JB Weld and bolted on the carburetor. Never leaked again till we turned it in for a newer model.
 

noahmercy

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 13, 2015
Messages
219
You may not be looking for my sympathy, but you got it! I've been engaged in a motorcycle repair project that should have taken a couple days, and it has drug out to nearly a month. Seems like everything I touch is dry rotted or frayed or broken, but not obvious until I actually work on that part of the bike, and I have to wait for parts since no one local has them.

But you know what? You didn't quit, I didn't quit, our projects are done, and things are working properly. Satisfaction earned. 😉
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2014
Messages
1,446
^^^MOST CERTAINLY.
I've seen a bunch of those 'field expedient repairs' still in place years later. That's one of the downsides of buying second hand equipment but one learns where to look for such shortcuts. One old baler I bought for parts had the 'baling wire' covered with J-B weld. Previous cobbler hadn't even bothered to remove the wire and clean the area before slathering on the J-B.
See that was a good repair, the baling wire added tensile strength if wound in the correct direction and then the JB Weld created sort of a
"Farmer's composite" type of repair patch.
Could be a genius late night marketing product...."The Farmer's Patch Kit" A roll of cheap wire and four tubes of epoxy. I can see the video's production
shots already. Some rusty generic POS machine, a few muddy cows and a sorta violated looking sheep wondering in the background. OK, maybe leave out the sheep....
 
Top