WW2 Vets will soon all be gone.

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eveled

Hunter
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Apr 3, 2012
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Soon there will be no more WWII vets. If someone joined in 1945 at 17 years old they would be 94 now. Not too many of them left.
I don’t want to side track the other thread. Mike’s post made me do a little research.

The youngest to serve during WW2 were born in 1930. At least one is still alive. He’s 92. So maybe 10 more years, 15 at the very best.

When I first joined the work force these WW2 Veterans were still working. It was something to work beside these heroes.

I remember my GreatGrandfather we called him Papere. Came home from France in 1918.

Even the Korean war veterans I knew personally are all gone.

I really miss them all.
 
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Lemont, PA, USA 16851
My dad turned 93 on Monday (10/3) and he is a WWII vet (joined when he was 16 - his VA record shows he was born in 1928 but he was actually born in 1929) His mom didn't sign his enlistment papers, his sister did. Long story short his Battalion CO in Germany (he was with the Constabulary with the occupation force) found out but since dad had a perfectly clean record he did not muster him out. Dad then later served during the Korean war (another long story) - with the Navy on an aircraft carrier - CV34 USS Oriskany.
 

turd

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My dad was 94 when he passed a year and a half ago. He joined the navy at 17, my grandma signed for him. He was in at the very end of the war, spent some time in a city then known as Shanghai. I still have some silk he gave to grandma when he came home. Stories of dead people floating down the river in China, being painted and feathered at first crossing of the international date line, pushing things overboard because they were no longer needed, spending hours at the guns using up ammunition no longer needed or wanted, etc. I am so proud to be his son, I only wish I had been able to live up to what that generation dealt with, and then just moved on and continued to build this country...........
 

txramfan

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Not to sidetrack any conversations pertaining to WWII Veterans, my pop and I were discussing this in his backyard a few weeks ago and he noted there were far more WWII veterans than WWII combat veterans.
Pop as I posted elsewhere is a combat vet, his younger brother was a WWII veteran .
Just an observation about the few still here who served then .
 

eveled

Hunter
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Apr 3, 2012
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4,232
Not to sidetrack any conversations pertaining to WWII Veterans, my pop and I were discussing this in his backyard a few weeks ago and he noted there were far more WWII veterans than WWII combat veterans.
Pop as I posted elsewhere is a combat vet, his younger brother was a WWII veteran .
Just an observation about the few still here who served then .
Thats very true. Also worth noting that many of the survivors had things happen to them that shortened their lives.

Malnutrition malaria lingering injuries ptsd etc. Some gave all, all gave some.

I also want to mention that the non combat veterans did their part and were often in harms way. They all deserve our respect.

One of my greatest moments came a few years ago when I thanked a Merchant Marine for his service in WW2. He broke down and cried. He told me I was the first person who ever thanked him. He had survived several torpedo attacks from German Uboats and lost a lot of friends.

Talk about forgotten heroes. God Bless them all.
 

vito

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Northern Illinois
I do volunteer work with a hospice agency. As a vet (Vietnam) I make "friendly visits" to vets on hospice care on the assumption that they will appreciate the chance to converse with fellow vets. I've been doing this now for about a year, and only once have had the honor of visiting a WWII vet. He was dying, at 101, and honestly did not seem to have any awareness of what was happening around him. One interesting part of my volunteer experience has been in seeing the importance some of these men have given to their often short military experience. One that I visit now served two years in the Air Force in the late 1950's, never saw anything related to war, but now very much wants to be buried in his old uniform. Another one is a fellow Vietnam vet, who served two tours as a door gunner in a Marine helicopter, and according to family members, never talked about his actual combat experience with anyone other than he does with me. I feel privileged to be well enough at 79 to be able to do this volunteer work. But the truth is that our society today has forgotten the sacrifices of its veterans.
 

Johnny-Baseball

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Peters Colony, Republica de Tejas
At age 17, my dad enlisted in the Navy in February 1942. After technical training as a fire controlman, dad was ordered to report to the USS Ellet (DD 398). Dad boarded the Ellet in April 1942 immediately upon its return from escorting the Hornet and Enterprise on the Doolittle bombing of Tokyo. Dad continually served aboard the Ellet (DD 398) throughout the Pacific campaign.

Until his death in 2017 Dad annually rode with me (a Vietnam vet) in my 2002 Corvette on each Veterans Day parade in downtown Dallas. I put a poster on the car's door that showed all the battle flags Ellet was awarded while dad was aboard.

Milton Worth
Frisco, TX 1924

U.S. Navy - P O 2nd​ Class
Fire Controlman Aboard
DD 398 USS Ellet
1942 – 1945


1942
Midway
Tulagi
Savo Island

1943
Guadalcanal

1944
Kwajalein
Eniwetak
Palau
Saipan
Bonins Islands Raids
Guam
Philippines Sea/Marianas Islands

1945
Iwo Jima


Knowledgeable military veterans (particularly Marines and Navy vets) paid dad personal thanks. I was so proud of him.
 
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g5m

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Jan 29, 2008
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144
Over the years I've met or known a lot of WW2 vets. Allies and Axis sides. All gone now. And we are losing a lot of Viet Nam and Viet Nam Era vets, too.
 

aaronrb204

Bearcat
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Oct 30, 2005
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bowling green, va
When I got a government job I was working for a Korean War vet. Later I worked with a veteran of the Frozen Chosin. My mother's father was a WW2 veteran. He was a navy man. Electrician on USS Yosemite. He told stories when she was a kid and we found out that based on the ship's records were all fake. Seeing as how the last known WW1 veteran died in 2011, I figure we still have 15 years before all the WW2 vets are gone.
 

Johnny-Baseball

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Peters Colony, Republica de Tejas
The youngest WW II vets were 17 in 1945. That makes them 95 now. I'm not optimistic they'll last until age 112. Maybe a couple will be 100+ but only a very small handful. We are at the end of that era. [My dad was 17 when he enlisted in January 1942. He died in 2017 at age 93, by far the longest living adult in his family tree. Today he would have been 98.]
 

6GUNSONLY

Hunter
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Alabama, in the bend of the Tennessee River
I knew personally (well) 3 WW2 vets, all gone now. One was at Omaha Beach, one a bombardier on a B-17 in the European Theatre, the other was in the Merchant Marine. All very good men, humble but proud of their service. Two of them I'd consider mentors right alongside my own dad, a Cold War era Navy veteran (USS Robert A. Owens, DDE 827, a destroyer, Atlantic Fleet). The bombardier, Jack, was last to go, he died in the past year. I know one still living WW2 vet, he was also in the first wave on D-Day.
Dad's Zippo:
IMG_20221010_194205987.jpg
 
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Johnny-Baseball

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Peters Colony, Republica de Tejas
"...my own dad, a Cold War era Navy veteran (USS Robert A. Owens, DDE 827, a destroyer, Atlantic Fleet)."
Back at 'cha. Here's a salute from three generations of Texans. First, my dad, a fire controlman on the USS Ellet (DD 398) which escorted the aircraft carriers Enterprise and Hornet on Doolittle's bombing of Tokyo in 1942. Another salue from me (USAF 1969-73, seismic analyst serving a 12-month tour on Mindanao, PI and 12 more along the Thai/Burma/Laos border region) and my son (a US Army Chinook maintainer in the 160th SOAR from 2005 through 2011, from then until the present a CWO Blackhawk pilot).
 

turd

Blackhawk
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Messages
998
Location
Sioux Falls, South Dakota
Oh, man it just pains me to see these guys go. I knew so many, all humble men that did what was needed, and never complained. Some gave all, all gave some. Are we up to that today??????
 

Armybrat

Buckeye
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Feb 22, 2007
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Round Rock, Texas
As a US Army reservist, my Dad was called up to active duty in 1938 to help run a CCC camp in Oregon, where my oldest brother was born.
In late 1940 he was to be transferred to one of two places - the Philippines or Alaska.
Luckily it was Fort Richardson, Alaska. Otherwise he probably would have met the same fate as a number of his friends & colleagues….dead or the Bataan Death March.
And my Mom & brother could have wound up in a Japanese Internment/prison camp for four years.

As it was, Dad served in the Aleutian Campaign of 1943 while Mom & my two older brothers were back Stateside.
He passed away at age 90 twenty years ago.

Oldest veteran I knew personally served during the 1898 war with Spain, but it was over before he could be shipped overseas.
 

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