Winchester large pistol primers

Help Support Ruger Forum:

Joined
Jan 15, 2007
Messages
2,459
Location
The Sticks---N.W. Orygun
Just bought an unopened 4 lb can of Unique - the label says "Hercules" rather than "Alliant", so it's at least 26 years old (likely older). It was priced right, so I figured it was worth the risk, guess we'll see...
:)
Does it look just like this one?
I picked this one up about a year ago. Had to dig deep into the cash reserves to come up with $10.
I didn't tell the seller that I would have paid his $10 just for the empty can.
Getting the 4 pounds of powder for free made it a true bargain.

 
Joined
Mar 5, 2015
Messages
2,200
Location
the Great State of Wide-open (WY)
Does it look just like this one?
I picked this one up about a year ago. Had to dig deep into the cash reserves to come up with $10.
I didn't tell the seller that I would have paid his $10 just for the empty can.
Getting the 4 pounds of powder for free made it a true bargain.


Yes, exactly like that, but with a lot number stamped near the bottom. I paid more than you did, but I collect old propellant tins also, so the can is definitely a bonus!
:)
 

Johnnu2

Hunter
Joined
Jun 26, 2003
Messages
3,106
Location
NYS
They make up a large portion of what is left of my lifetime supply inventory. I bought most of mine back in the 80's and maybe early 90's. I love it when I open a fresh brick and find that I had put the receipt inside. Most were $9.99 per 1000 but I have found some that I was gouged on with the receipt showing I paid $14.99 per 1000. I have loaded and fired unknown thousands of rounds and never had a primer issue with either Winchester or CCI.

Hey AJ, just an FYI. I was told by a CCI tech several years ago, that if I stored primers in a sealed (metal) ammo can, they would be the equivalent of a "stick of dynamite each" if there was a house fire and they 'went up'. He recommended taking the tops OFF the ammo cans and definitely not sealing them. Of course, humidity and temp controlled room was mandatory. I did what he said and also installed a fire sprinkler system in that room (I'm on municipal water.... not a well).
J.
 
Joined
Mar 14, 2017
Messages
776
Hey AJ, just an FYI. I was told by a CCI tech several years ago, that if I stored primers in a sealed (metal) ammo can, they would be the equivalent of a "stick of dynamite each" if there was a house fire and they 'went up'. He recommended taking the tops OFF the ammo cans and definitely not sealing them. Of course, humidity and temp controlled room was mandatory. I did what he said and also installed a fire sprinkler system in that room (I'm on municipal water.... not a well).
J.
Fyi
Been through such a fire and that ain't what happened.
 

J. Yuma

Single-Sixer
Joined
Apr 4, 2024
Messages
118
Location
north carolina
I am the proud owner of 3 bricks of primers.
I was thinking of storing each brick separately.
Military ammo cans are safest?
 
Joined
Aug 3, 2010
Messages
573
Location
Twin Cities, MN
Hey AJ, just an FYI. I was told by a CCI tech several years ago, that if I stored primers in a sealed (metal) ammo can, they would be the equivalent of a "stick of dynamite each" if there was a house fire and they 'went up'. He recommended taking the tops OFF the ammo cans and definitely not sealing them. Of course, humidity and temp controlled room was mandatory. I did what he said and also installed a fire sprinkler system in that room (I'm on municipal water.... not a well).
J.

Fortunately, ammocans aren't beefy enough to hold much pressure. If they cook off, the can will split and vent the gas. Remember, they were designed for the military to hold ammo in a war zone. They don't want surprise pipe bombs either. :D
 
Joined
Mar 14, 2017
Messages
776
What did happen?
There were a lot of ammo cans, some containing loaded ammo and some containing primers.
Due to the nature of the fire it was hard to tell which ammo can was which afterwards.
The cans all popped open. There were a few cans with some obvious holes in them, but most were open and empty. What specifically caused the holes I do not know. This was a shop containing thousands of primers and tens of thousands of rounds of ammo. There were zero explosions.
 

HumphreyDaBear

Bearcat
Joined
Jun 9, 2024
Messages
68
Location
Hoosierville
No explosions, but one heck of a hot fire for awhile I bet. When I was a kid my dad loaded shot shells as he shot competition Trap & Skeet. He used, I believe, 7625, red dot and green dot. They were in cylindrical red metal canisters. Does this seem correct as the type of container back the 1980's, or is my memory taking a downward turn today? I know I woke uglier than yesterday, which surprised me. I guess being ugly does not have a saturation point.
 
Joined
May 28, 2004
Messages
1,402
Location
MN
…red dot and green dot. They were in cylindrical red metal canisters. Does this seem correct as the type of container back the 1980's, or is my memory taking a downward turn today?

When I started in the late 80's, the cylindrical 1-pound canisters for the Hercules brand powders were cardoard. They had metal tops and bottoms, and a plastic pour spout that you'd have to pull up.

They had almost a light foil-like finish on at least part of the cylindrical canister… like this:

IMG_8836.jpeg
 

Get Wood

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 16, 2017
Messages
202
Location
Mid Ohio.
They make up a large portion of what is left of my lifetime supply inventory. I bought most of mine back in the 80's and maybe early 90's. I love it when I open a fresh brick and find that I had put the receipt inside. Most were $9.99 per 1000 but I have found some that I was gouged on with the receipt showing I paid $14.99 per 1000. I have loaded and fired unknown thousands of rounds and never had a primer issue with either Winchester or CCI.

Same Here. And When I Posted I Paid $10.00 A Brick And $10.00 A Lb. For Powder I Was Told I Was Full Of CRap.... The Good Ole Days. Who Knew They Would End...
 
Joined
Dec 24, 2009
Messages
624
Location
Flat Rock, NC
In the 70s I paid $6.33 WW 748 powder. I expect that that equates to about $18.00/pound in today's money.

All Winchester powders are Ball powder which is notoriously hard to light. Winchester primers tend to be hotter. In the 70s-80s would light BLc2 powder without hangfires. I experienced hangfires with CCI Large Rifle primers with this powder, switched to Winchester LR primers, problem went away. That was over 40 years ago. I am still using them. I have a friend/customer who is a black powder cartridge rifle shooter/competitor, he says the Winchester LR primers most closely performs like the primers of the 19th Century.
 
Joined
Nov 17, 2009
Messages
12,207
Location
Webster, MD.
If you use a Lee Auto Prime (hand held tool) or Auto Prime II (press mounted), I think Lee originally recommended using either CCI or Winchester primers to avoid accidents.

As always, best to play it safe!
:)
Using my LEE Classic I was reloading some .222 last night and used the CCI primers. I see no reference, in the instruction sheet, as to what type to use.
 
Joined
Mar 5, 2015
Messages
2,200
Location
the Great State of Wide-open (WY)
Using my LEE Classic I was reloading some .222 last night and used the CCI primers. I see no reference, in the instruction sheet, as to what type to use.

Yeah, a good friend has some kind of Lee primer feed/priming tool mounted on his Lee turret press (a semi-progressive setup), and he says the instructions don't mention any restrictions on primer brand/type. Lee apparently has definite recommendations for some of their priming tools, but not for others. I emailed them, asking about using Fiocchi primers in the Lee Auto Prime tools I use, and they emailed back very quickly. If in doubt, I might check their web site for an email address, and shoot 'em a specific question. They seem to be good folks.
:)
 

Latest posts

Top