What did I do after I retired?

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Grouch Attack retired last May and immediately moved in with her Mother to take care of her. Actually, I'm not sure she retired but rather just stopped going to work. It took 7 months for management to notice her absence and start paying her to not come back. She lived with her Mother 6 days a week and came home with dirty laundry on Saturday(sounds like a college student?) so her retirement wasn't any real issue here. She came back home 2 months ago and NOW, there are some issues around the house.
This is something many folks don't consider about retirement. Suddenly, the retiree is around the house all the time. The spouse may find this upsetting.
 

Garth69

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View attachment 21129
Bob I am sorry to hear about your wife Nita. My 1st wife Lori died 9 years ago tomorrow. I figured you guys might like to see our project at work now. We have the Boilermakers in retubing one of our 500 horse Cleaver Brooks 4 pass boilers. There is almost a mile of tube in one of these boilers. So for the weekend I have steaks marinating for the grill and my wife Joan and I are going to enjoy our picnic pavilion. Life is Good!!!
that picture reminds me of my time as an engineer 34 years for the state of Ga. CB750 twins at multiple locations around the state. We also had some gigantic hurst boilers in places. I like the Cleaver Brooks units better
 

Garth69

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Grouch Attack retired last May and immediately moved in with her Mother to take care of her. Actually, I'm not sure she retired but rather just stopped going to work. It took 7 months for management to notice her absence and start paying her to not come back. She lived with her Mother 6 days a week and came home with dirty laundry on Saturday(sounds like a college student?) so her retirement wasn't any real issue here. She came back home 2 months ago and NOW, there are some issues around the house.
This is something many folks don't consider about retirement. Suddenly, the retiree is around the house all the time. The spouse may find this upsetting.
lots of marriages don't survive retirement.
 

Garth69

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OK a little backstory I have worked for the same company for 34 years. I've been in a variety of jobs with the company during those times and the last four years or so has been a regression instead of moving forward in like career - getting to the age of retirement, and lately, my work parameters were changed to include some things that I was not happy with and in fact I flatly refused to play along so the choice was made not play their silly little game's . They can take of the machines or work that I have been doing or maybe going through the work without me. No matter to me😁 I put in my retirement for mid March, but was asked to extend it through the first part of April. we have a amical dissolution and I spent the first month after retirement fixing things around the house, help with the granddaughter and children and dog, and have had my hands full with just those things that you have let slide behind when you're more focused on things like work . I still have Many more things that need to be done but I got this hankering for something to do just for me, a sorting through my Morgan's, looking at the fire arms directions I've been leaning toward, and seeing if there's anything there I have interest in—- but not at this time. Might want to collect a couple of more GP 100s or something a little special in the old model class but nothing that really strikes be as motivated right now to find a direction I would like to explore for a set variety or type. Lately by golly there's been just whatever strikes by fancy at the time without any rhyme or reason. So I'm trying to spend time with minor remodeling to get a bathroom fancied up a bit, but that doesn't really count. And I would love to have my sons work, he manages a power sports business. Lol they have all kind of things that are fun, like motorcycles that I would love to get into again, they would have one of those Can-Am motorcycle franchises And also the slingshot and of course the standard four-wheel-drive off-road ATVs and boats and more kinds of boats. They got the big boats and in a little boats they've got pontoon boats they've got jet skis they have got fishing boats for Crappie white perch, bass boats they got fiberglass boats they got metal boats , they have ranger boats they have Xpress boats and they have the G 3s which I got to look it up Nice G3 17 footer with a 70 hp motor on the back seems to be about the right thing. Then we got to talking & got to look at the different things I could do, and the fact that I'm not as stable as I used to be in a small little rocky boat so with that being said, the best thing for me to be in was discussed many times.And over three days it progressed to the point that I am now the proud owner of this little guy


View attachment 21094

Well put it in the water next week for its maiden voyage. 😋😋😋😋😋😋View attachment 21095

YIPPPEEE
that is one nice RIG! go fish!
 
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Grouch Attack retired last May and immediately moved in with her Mother to take care of her. Actually, I'm not sure she retired but rather just stopped going to work. It took 7 months for management to notice her absence and start paying her to not come back. She lived with her Mother 6 days a week and came home with dirty laundry on Saturday(sounds like a college student?) so her retirement wasn't any real issue here. She came back home 2 months ago and NOW, there are some issues around the house.
This is something many folks don't consider about retirement. Suddenly, the retiree is around the house all the time. The spouse may find this upsetting.

With our time together getting very short. We are spending as much time together as possible and have since we both retired.
 
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View attachment 21129
Bob I am sorry to hear about your wife Nita. My 1st wife Lori died 9 years ago tomorrow. I figured you guys might like to see our project at work now. We have the Boilermakers in retubing one of our 500 horse Cleaver Brooks 4 pass boilers. There is almost a mile of tube in one of these boilers. So for the weekend I have steaks marinating for the grill and my wife Joan and I are going to enjoy our picnic pavilion. Life is Good!!!

Retube. Scaling, pitting or tube sheet to tube issues? Ever notice there is never enough room to work on boilers?
 
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Noticed you live in Alexandria, You have lots of good fishing around you!! Put Livescope on front and work on those Crappie. I have never regretted buying my bassboat. When you go fishing and never have to glance at a watch, thats a really good day.
Alexandria VA? I'm in La Plata MD. Maybe we can get together for fishing and shooting?
 
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I retired in 2006. Still sort of miss being on job sites smelling the ozone from welding, and hearing the clang of steel drop offs. And the sound of back up alarms. But then.........

I do what I want to when I want to or not do anything at all. Had a few good, really good, years with my wife, then Nita died almost one year ago.

Still, there is life to be lived, and I do have a couple of nieces who include me in their lives and a wonderful church family with whom I share time. My church family really is closer to me than my actual family. And, I do spend time, maybe too much, on forums such as this and on Face Book. I know many here knock FaceBook but I've even learned some things there and found many Ruger afficiondos there.

So, I have no one to share a lot of stuff with, but life is still a blast. And even after, it'll be better!

Bob Wright
Yeah I get my welding fix playing around with projects and building things for my friends Gun shops. Will work for Guns and Ammo!
 
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I retired at the end of 2015 for my 2nd run at cancer. After treatment and a couple of months idle I went back to work. I worked there for a year and walked out rather than throw some idiot who I caught sabotaging equipment off of the 6th floor roof. I did a bunch of small consulting jobs and then had my 3rd bout of cancer which so far has been the worst. In January of 2018 I started with my current employer and have no intention of leaving until the cancer center tells me that I should not work anymore. I was working part-time weekends and on call for a couple of other places when a full-time position came open. I currently work straight afternoon shift Monday through Friday and love it. I had a 4th run at cancer in December and went back to work in January. I love my wife dearly but a month of Hallmark Channel and the talk shows was more than enough. As my cousin Lenny used to say.... My work is my pleasure....
You obviously need hobbies!!!
 
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Retube. Scaling, pitting or tube sheet to tube issues? Ever notice there is never enough room to work on boilers?
Jeepnik,
I spent many years designing the installation of exchangers and all the rest of the required equipment in all types of plant operations. Most of the maintenance had to be done on site so access had to be allowed for in design. We always considered the need for the maintenance required such as head removal, bundle removal, and rod out of the tubes in fixed tube sheets. The company that I worked for also owned B&W, who built a few boilers.:)
 
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Jeepnik,
I spent many years designing the installation of exchangers and all the rest of the required equipment in all types of plant operations. Most of the maintenance had to be done on site so access had to be allowed for in design. We always considered the need for the maintenance required such as head removal, bundle removal, and rod out of the tubes in fixed tube sheets. The company that I worked for also owned B&W, who built a few boilers.:)
I was the Chief Welding Inspector for a few power plants before I retired. The new HRSG plants have some major boilers! First Fire is always an experience. The ultimate is bringing a nuke back online!!! It's like the Hand of God and an Earthquake rolled into one!!!
 

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Joined
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On the beach and in the hills
Jeepnik,
I spent many years designing the installation of exchangers and all the rest of the required equipment in all types of plant operations. Most of the maintenance had to be done on site so access had to be allowed for in design. We always considered the need for the maintenance required such as head removal, bundle removal, and rod out of the tubes in fixed tube sheets. The company that I worked for also owned B&W, who built a few boilers.:)

Ran and repaired many B&W's. But not all engineers are bright. I had one customer with two WIFI (water for injection in making pharmaceuticals) distillation units. Big exchangers with steam on one side and highly purified water on the other. When they installed them they hadn't completed all of the exterior walls. Yep, you guessed it, less that two feet from the head to the exterior wall. When it was time to replace the bundles (the purified water is relatively hard even on stainless) they had to knock a hole in the wall.

At the same facility, they needed to replace aging chilled water units. They had an exterior wall when they were installed that could be opened in the future. But someone decided to install a cooling tower next to the wall. Cut holes in the roof for that one. I could go on, but I'm sure you guys have seen similar stuff. They ought to make engineers work ten years in the types of plants they design before they even pick up a pencil.
 
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Joined
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On the beach and in the hills
HVY, did water quality consulting the last twenty years I worked. Among the units I consulted on were HSRG's on gas turbine cogen plants. Mainly for the oil industry, but also for a local sanitation department. I have enough old customers that call that I keep my hand in.
 
Joined
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Ran and repaired many B&W's. But not all engineers are bright. I had one customer with two WIFI (water for injection in making pharmaceuticals) distillation units. Big exchangers with steam on one side and highly purified water on the other. When they installed them they hadn't completed all of the exterior walls. Yep, you guessed it, less that two feet from the head to the exterior wall. When it was time to replace the bundles (the purified water is relatively hard even on stainless) they had to knock a hole in the wall.

At the same facility, they needed to replace aging chilled water units. They had an exterior wall when they were installed that could be opened in the future. But someone decided to install a cooling tower next to the wall. Cut holes in the roof for that one. I could go on, but I'm sure you guys have seen similar stuff. They ought to make engineers work ten years in the types of plants they design before they even pick up a pencil.
It's amazing how corrosive pure water is!!!
 

GypsmJim

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I believe Social Security started in 1939. My Grandpa retired early in 1958 due to health (after contributing for 19 Years), and lived to 1995 at age 95, collecting SS for 37 years. I guess he got his money's worth.

I retired at age 66 (full retirement). Now, I do what I darn well please and get up when I feel like it. Before retirement I worked a full 50 years. Never got fired or laid off and never had a day without a paycheck (and of course taxes to pay.) My last years was in a 24/7/365 job with a cellphone in case they needed me. Of course if on vacation 300 miles away they understood I would not come in to fix things, but merely advise on the phone.

To me retirement is a blessing. I don't NEED to find things to do. It all comes naturally. Or, if I simply want to sit on the patio and drink beer, that's OK too.

It sucks to be a person with anxiety or depression, but it is what it is. Find a hobby or a common friend and move on.
 

GypsmJim

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They ought to make engineers work ten years in the types of plants they design before they even pick up a pencil.
I was hired as a wet-behind-the-ears young kid right out of the University. They made me the understudy of an old codger (Fart) and told me I had 8 years to learn everything he knew because that's when he was to retire.

"Fart" was an understatement. He truly was "The Man", but PO'd everyone he met. While on a company trip he decked a Plant Manager and The VP Manufacturing said he could not enter one of his plants ever again. Now, only after 9 months on the job, MY VP asked if I was up to taking over. I said "sure".

My industry rapidly advanced in to the technology of today. At age 30 I designed what was to become the standard of today.

Maybe it took me only 8 years to get there, but your ten year criterion isn't too far off. But I can truly say that getting thrown to the wolves before becoming fully prepared ain't a bad idea either.
 
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To all the Powerhouse guys! We are a dying trade. The boiler I showed you is a 500 horse 4 pass Cleaver Brooks. It's 50 years old and having a complete retubing. 273 tubes if I remember correctly. I take great pride in being The Watertender and I am known by that in the trade. Some of you who have seen me in person know that I have a real left handed pipe wrench. I have done water treatment for many years and several companies have open job offers to me. At this point in time I have trained the Chief Engineers for many facilities and have been asked several times to teach adult education for Stationary Engineer licensing. The last place where I was Chief had 4 1600 horse Babcock-Wilcox Stirling pattern boilers that were 4 stories tall and an 800 horse Cleaver Brooks 4 pass CBLE. The Powerhouse also had 4 3516 Caterpillar generator sets putting out 4160 volts. That was a good size plant. Tomorrow I am taking an apprentice plumber and steam fitter for a tour of 2 Powerhouses and for breakfast with a master plumber. Since my only child was killed in a motorcycle accident by a texting driver I have been getting young people into the skilled trades in his honor. It's better for me to be working instead of sitting around. I was off for a month for surgery and was so happy to get back to work. Incase you think all I do is work, look at what we grilled today!
20230513_190050.jpg
 
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I was hired as a wet-behind-the-ears young kid right out of the University. They made me the understudy of an old codger (Fart) and told me I had 8 years to learn everything he knew because that's when he was to retire.

"Fart" was an understatement. He truly was "The Man", but PO'd everyone he met. While on a company trip he decked a Plant Manager and The VP Manufacturing said he could not enter one of his plants ever again. Now, only after 9 months on the job, MY VP asked if I was up to taking over. I said "sure".

My industry rapidly advanced in to the technology of today. At age 30 I designed what was to become the standard of today.

Maybe it took me only 8 years to get there, but your ten year criterion isn't too far off. But I can truly say that getting thrown to the wolves before becoming fully prepared ain't a bad idea either.
When I went to work at a maximum security prison I was sent to sensitivity training with a retired Boilermaker who hired on as a welder. He was asked "how do you view inmates"?... He asked "whadda ya mean how do I view 'em"? " I look at 'em with SCORN! They're fookin' convicts ain't they "?

I am sure plenty of you guys can relate. We were a better country when we had crusty bastards like that instead of the woke snowflakes we are dealing with now.
 
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