We who grew up in the 50's had the best life !

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Joined
Jan 2, 2005
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3,704
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Northern Illinois
I was born in 1943 and remember almost everything named in this thread. Living in Brooklyn, NY was a paradise for kids like me. Played outside until it was dark. Behaved (mostly) because EVERYONE knew who you were and where you lived. Without a/c the adults sat outside on folding chairs in the summer and kept eyes on all the kids. We had some known Mafia members living on my block, but in those days the criminals mostly fought among themselves and did not shoot randomly out of car windows killing innocent kids.

But in fairness, all was not as perfect as some of us might remember. There was polio, which sent parents into deathly fear every summer. A really damaged knee meant a wheelchair for life, not a prosthetic knee. Blocked arteries in the heart meant an early death, not a bypass surgery.

On the other hand, major league baseball was about the only sport that we followed (no one paid much attention to the NFL, or the NBA, and the NHL was so desperate that I went to dozens of NY Rangers games with free tickets given out weekly to Boy Scout troops) and without the unions and "free agents", you could get to know the names of every player on your home town team (and they stayed with one team for their whole career). Cursing in public was virtually unknown, and teachers in school instilled traditional values and patriotism in their students. And America, having just won WWII, was the undisputed leader of the world, and EVERYONE knew that we were the good guys.

Truly wondrous days for those of us lucky enough to have grown up in that era.
 

KIR

Sparks, NV
Joined
Mar 2, 2022
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1,345
Currently have a 110 Buck Knife that my ex-fiancee gave to me; belonged to her deceased hubby. I also have a Schwinn bike, but it is a 10 speed Varsity that I bought in 1972. Still have a few 45 rpm and 78 rpm records too...and a player to listen to them on.
 

XP100

Blackhawk
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Aug 28, 2003
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753
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Florida
I remember a big wooden barrel at the end of the sporting goods counter in a Woolworth's store full of military surplus rifles, No trigger locks, We went in pulled them out shouldered them and pointed them at the ceiling . Didn't know one from the other but they were neat looking rifles. Of course I could not afford any of them at 16.
 

Mauser9

Blackhawk
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Ma.
I remember a big wooden barrel at the end of the sporting goods counter in a Woolworth's store full of military surplus rifles, No trigger locks, We went in pulled them out shouldered them and pointed them at the ceiling . Didn't know one from the other but they were neat looking rifles. Of course I could not afford any of them at 16.
Yep I recall. Old box jammed with milsurps for cheap. Even our LGS had a old cardboard box filled with milsurps and other guns which had seen better days. I use to walk by and sneer at the "junk box" while drooling over the shiny and walnut stocked guns. Friend grabbed a Type 99 Jap rifle for $25. That was around 1972. He should have held onto it. Going for a lot more now!!
 
Joined
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New Jersey
Winky Dink...Vaguely remember putting a clear plastic screen in front of the TV screen and drawing lines on it with an eraseable marker that eventually would give one a code word.
Buster Brown (Shoes) and his dog Tag (?)
Beany and Cecil the Seasick Sea Serpent who would sing...R-A-G-G...M-O-P-P Rag Mop...
Doooeeeesss...your shoe have a boy inside? What a funny place for a boy to hide;
Does your shoe have a dog there too? A boy and a dog and a foot in a shoe;
Well, the boy is Buster Browne and The dog is Tighe his friend;
And It's really just a picture, but it's fun to play pretend;
So look look look in the telephone book for the store that sells the shoe;
With a picture of the boy and the dog inside so you can put....your...foot...in...too!

My mother used to love to hear me sing that. ;-)
 
Joined
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Greenville, SC: USA
Which brings up a question for you folks a tad older than me... (I am on medicare). I listen to old time radio on series xm and they are always using a phone number like listed by the OP... "Yukon 596"? So, how did you dial that or did you just always call the operator and ask to be connected?
 
Joined
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Messages
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Richmond Texas USA
Which brings up a question for you folks a tad older than me... (I am on medicare). I listen to old time radio on series xm and they are always using a phone number like listed by the OP... "Yukon 596"? So, how did you dial that or did you just always call the operator and ask to be connected?
If you had a NON dial phone you told the operator the number and she connected. That is how it was in my small town.
If you had a dial phone the phone had letters with the numbers. Like #2 was also A B C and so on. I think the letter prefix went away in the 60s

We of a certain age remember when telephone numbers used to start with names instead of digits. The first two letters of the name were usually capitalized, and they corresponded to the first two digits of the phone number on a dial. This system started in the 1930s and lasted well into the '60s. Before that, three letters and four numbers were used. The phone exchange was prior to area codes and prefixes. The exchange names did more than provide a phone number. They identified the area of the city where you lived.
Boy you are a young Whippersnapper.
1664478980695.png
 
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Joined
Sep 1, 2003
Messages
6,806
Location
Richmond Texas USA
I remember a big wooden barrel at the end of the sporting goods counter in a Woolworth's store full of military surplus rifles, No trigger locks, We went in pulled them out shouldered them and pointed them at the ceiling . Didn't know one from the other but they were neat looking rifles. Of course I could not afford any of them at 16.
This Winchester Garand came from Houston Woolworth for $275 in 1995. They had an ad in the paper for them. The store closed soon after.

1664479660625.png
 

Ride1949

Hunter
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Oregon
I bought a Japanese type 44 for$20.00 in '65 and a British .303 enfield for $14.95 in '76 from barrels like that at Kmart. I should have hung on to both of them. They've gone up a little in value since then. ;)

 
Joined
Nov 15, 2005
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10,067
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Greenville, SC: USA
Actually digital push button phones still have the letters on the number keys... at least my office phone does.... I used to work with, read that as mess with those old dial phones, my uncle actually owned a phone company here in rural S.C. And I would go to his office shop and mess with the phones laying around and some times hook them up. He finally sold out back the 90's for a small sum....
Back in the 60's he had a big satellite dish behind the building that was part of NASA.

So I think when I call customers back I'm going to leave my phone number as "ADA 9811" or I guess I need to add the area code: "TOG ADA 9811"
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
China Spring TX
Which brings up a question for you folks a tad older than me... (I am on medicare). I listen to old time radio on series xm and they are always using a phone number like listed by the OP... "Yukon 596"? So, how did you dial that or did you just always call the operator and ask to be connected?

The only old phone number like that I remember is BR549, talk to a guy named Junior about getting a car.
 
Joined
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Richmond Texas USA
So I think when I call customers back I'm going to leave my phone number as "ADA 9811" or I guess I need to add the area code: "TOG ADA 9811"

Nope close but no cigar. It would be AD2-9811 I believe the reason the letters went away was so area codes could be used

For most cities, this conversion required the addition of extra digits or letters to the existing central office prefix. For example, the Atlantic City, New Jersey, telephone number 4-5876 was converted to AT4-5876 in the 1950s. Complete replacement of existing prefixes was necessary in the case of conflicts with another office in the state. Duplication of central office names, or an identical mapping of two different names to digits, was not uncommon. In practice, the conversion of the nation to this numbering plan took decades to accomplish and was not complete before the alphanumeric number format was abandoned in the 1960s in favor of all-number calling
 
Joined
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On the beach and in the hills
I still mess with folks by starting my phone number with TE(erminal)x-xxxx. Removed a fence not that long agow with a builders metal sign that listed the city as Long Beach and the number as xxxx. Yep, the got hold of the operator and would say Long Beach xxxx. This was even before the prefixes and there must have only been a maximum of 9999 phone numbers in the city of Long Beach. Funny thing, that fence lasted almost 70 years. The one at my house is about twenty and needs replacing. Wood isn't near what it once was.
 

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
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Jun 24, 2004
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Memphis, TN USA
There were some drawbacks I'd never want to see again: We waited for a girl's death as she died from polio, or as we called it, infantile paralysis.

And though I was immune to it, Blacks didn't have such a good time of it then. At some time I realized what it might have been like to get, or lose, a job because of skin color. I lived in the day of segregation and did have that prejudice. Seems now though the penduluum has swung full cycle.

I don't want to go back, but I sure wish things could turn around today.

Bob Wright
 

nekvermont

Buckeye
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Sep 10, 2010
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vermont
Oh, the good old days. Thanks for the memories.
Anyone have a telephone that was on a Party Line? I remember three different rings, if it was 3 rings it was for our house. You knew someone was always listening in and it really sucked when you had to make a call and your neighbor was hogging the phone. :)
 
Joined
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Richmond Texas USA
Oh, the good old days. Thanks for the memories.
Anyone have a telephone that was on a Party Line? I remember three different rings, if it was 3 rings it was for our house. You knew someone was always listening in and it really sucked when you had to make a call and your neighbor was hogging the phone. :)
Yes we had a party line because they were cheaper than a private line.

There were some drawbacks I'd never want to see again: We waited for a girl's death as she died from polio, or as we called it, infantile paralysis.

And though I was immune to it, Blacks didn't have such a good time of it then. At some time I realized what it might have been like to get, or lose, a job because of skin color. I lived in the day of segregation and did have that prejudice. Seems now though the pendulum has swung full cycle.

I don't want to go back, but I sure wish things could turn around today.

Bob Wright

Bob,
I had school friends that were in an Iron Lung, this was probably 1949-1950. At that time the reason why you got Polio was a big mystery and some of the reasons were ridiculous.
Curious as to why you think you were immune to it since the cause wasn't known.
For some reason I never caught any of the childhood diseases.
I had 3 sisters and they all caught different ones. In fact the last time I have been sick, other than a cold, was 1970 when I had the flu.
On a later fear I didn't get the jab for Covid, wear mask or do anything non normal. Lucky I guess since I didn't get it and I'm in the high risk factor.
 

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
Messages
7,480
Location
Memphis, TN USA
Yes we had a party line because they were cheaper than a private line.



Bob,
I had school friends that were in an Iron Lung, this was probably 1949-1950. At that time the reason why you got Polio was a big mystery and some of the reasons were ridiculous.
Curious as to why you think you were immune to it since the cause wasn't known.
For some reason I never caught any of the childhood diseases.
I had 3 sisters and they all caught different ones. In fact the last time I have been sick, other than a cold, was 1970 when I had the flu.
On a later fear I didn't get the jab for Covid, wear mask or do anything non normal. Lucky I guess since I didn't get it and I'm in the high risk factor.

I meant I was immune to racism, not to polio. Being white, I was not subject to any race related decisions. Sorry about the mix up.

As to causes of polio, there was a scare that it was transmitted through contaminated waterr in swimming pools. Many folks feared going to the pools.

Bob Wright
 
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