WBR and the transfer bar

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Danjet500

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I understand the reason for the transfer bar and how it functions. What I want to know is what caused WBR to implement it. Was it actual lawsuits, potential lawsuits, was he planning ahead of the curve, ie trying to avoid future trouble or was he just planning the next generation of SA revolvers? Were there deaths or accidents from careless handling of OMs prior to the change? Is there a good article or book with the truthful explanation of it?
Thanks.
 

CraigC

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There were some dummies who had a negligent discharge because they did not know how to properly handle a single action revolver and were injured as a result. Rather than taking responsibility for their own ignorance, they sued Ruger. The result was the New Model action that debuted in 1973.

Safety is, and always will be, between the ears. Nothing is foolproof, the world is always producing a better fool.
 

BearHawk 357

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There were some dummies who had a negligent discharge because they did not know how to properly handle a single action revolver and were injured as a result. Rather than taking responsibility for their own ignorance, they sued Ruger. The result was the New Model action that debuted in 1973.

The next sentence should read: This debut was one of the greatest inventions in all of gun design history. More lives have been saved by this invention than most of the newer so called gun "safties" that have been forced upon us. The transfer bar debate is kind of a bitter-sweet one if you ask me. Your mileage may vary.
 
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Actually, the transfer-bar system was around for a long time before Ruger incorporated it into his guns. It was used by at least a couple of manufacturers earlier . . . I'm sure somebody will come along and tell us which ones.

WBR's real contribution was to use it in all his revolvers (except the Old Army) and to offer the free conversion for all the Old Models.

;)
 

J Miller

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Wow, if the transfer bar is such a great thing ............ how come all I own is uncorrupted OLD MODELS????

Come on guys, the transfer bar was nothing more than a CYA move on Ruger's part. Had it not been for the law suits we'd still be shooting Blackhawks with 4 clicks.

Wait .... I still am shooting Blackhawks with 4 clicks, hmmmm.
OH, yeah, and by the way....the only Ruger Blackhawk I've ever had an ND with LOL was a New Model. Never had one with a Colt or any SA with the Colt style lock work. After that ND I ditched the New Models and went back to my Old Models and never looked back.

In my opinion Ruger's super duper transfer bar just made it easier for shooters not to think. I won't let a shooter that's never owned an Old Model shoot mine without a big course of "HOW TO USE A REAL SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER". It's called CYA :wink:

Joe
 

CraigC

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BearHawk 357":3i1qj2od said:
The next sentence should read: This debut was one of the greatest inventions in all of gun design history.
Not hardly! If the New Model action was so safe and the traditional action SOOOO dangerous, there would not be the huge market for traditional guns. They would've gone the way of the dodo bird. We wouldn't have companies like Colt, USFA, Uberti, Armi San Marco, Pietta, etc. producing traditional guns by the thousands WITHOUT a goofy safety.


J Miller":3i1qj2od said:
In my opinion Ruger's super duper transfer bar just made it easier for shooters not to think.
Exactly!
 

chet15

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Ale-8(1)":3ho8n3gv said:
Actually, the transfer-bar system was around for a long time before Ruger incorporated it into his guns. It was used by at least a couple of manufacturers earlier . . . I'm sure somebody will come along and tell us which ones.
;)

Yup, Hopkins and Allen I believe had the first patent on a transfer bar type system for revolvers. Can't tell you a date on it right now though, but was a long long time ago.
Chet15
 

contender

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Actually, I believe that the only lawsuit ever LOST by Ruger was AFTER they had been building the NM's. In the judges ruling,, he stated that Bill Ruger knew he had a "defective" design as he built a safer design. I think that's the way I recall it from reading a stock report from days of old....!
As to why,, he built them in the first place,, I can't recall correctly,, but his wasn't the first design,, as noted.
 

hittman

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Danjet500":4zk6tu02 said:
Is there a good article or book with the truthful explanation of it? Thanks.

Parts of pages 126 and 127 of Ruger and His Guns by R. L. Wilson.

Creating the Single Action Transfer Bar System; Bill Ruger Remembers

"In the middle of our customary heavy workload of research and development, the 1968 gun law came along, which had import limitations, and size and import criteria. There was a point system to qualify a gun for importatiion. And that's where a "drop test" first evolved and that's where we thought we might not pass it. I think by that time we ourselves were wondering what this meant, since we didn't think the gun (Ruger "old model" single action revolver) was not safe. We felt really that if there was to be some standard requirement, it would be best if we conformed. Anyway, that was the whole atmosphere, the evolution of the (1973 Ruger New Model) design linking the transfer bar to the trigger as we do.
 

BigJ71

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Boy oh boy...lots of bad talk about the transfer bar!

I for one LOVE it! Why you ask?? Simple, I'm a hunter and for a hunter the transfer bar system makes the revolver WAY safer than an Old Model...hands down.

Sure I know how to load one then skip one yada, yada, yada, that's not the point. The point is, what happens on them cold November days when your wearing a glove and your quarry walks out into a shooting lane? You cock the revolver only to have your target move out of there and not give you a shot...now what??

Now you have to carefully set that hammer down, then back to half cock, then index the cylinder back so the empty chamber is next in line, then either ear back the hammer again and set it down on the empty chamber or release the hammer down and manually move the cylinder into position with your fingers (not the proper way to do by the way) so that the empty chamber is again under the hammer....no that's not unsafe :roll: If you slip at any time during that procedure, or drop it, the gun will most likely go off, remember you've got bulky gloves on or maybe it's raining or snowing.

I haven't even touched on the absolute and complete racket that's all going to make when you're trying to be as quiet as possible, might as well have a single shot because you can kiss a second shot good by especially with a wise old Whitetail.

Now with a New Model, you simply pull the trigger with your thumb on the hammer then take your finger off the trigger, now there is no way that gun is going off even if your thumb slips. Set that hammer down and you are ready to take your next shot.

Believe me, I speak from experience, I started out pistol hunting with Old Models and every time I had to let that hammer down I asked myself, why the hell I wasn't using a New Model. Since about the mid 80's I've hunted with nothing but New Models and never looked back. Yeah, I love my Old Model Rugers, they are great shooters, but I'll never hunt with one again, I'll take that New Model with that silly unneeded transfer bar thingy. :D

Getting back to the original question.....Maybe ole Bill knew he could make a better and safer hunting revolver. :wink:
 

cas6969

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CraigC":34i1lzt0 said:
If the New Model action was so safe and the traditional action SOOOO dangerous, there would not be the huge market for traditional guns.

There's a huge demand for tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs too. Don't mean they're safe. :wink:



(I'll let you guys write your own addiction jokes here) :lol:
 

keyston44

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I watched a show about Charter Arms one time and it said they invented the transfer bar safety. They didn't patent it so all the other manufactures could use it also. Key
 

pisgah

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keyston44":157qf2r2 said:
I watched a show about Charter Arms one time and it said they invented the transfer bar safety. They didn't patent it so all the other manufactures could use it also. Key

Companies like Iver Johnson (with their "Hammer the hammer" slogan) had transfer-bar actions long before Charter ever existed.
 

CraigC

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cas":3exfzwrf said:
There's a huge demand for tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs too. Don't mean they're safe. :wink:
There's also a huge market for cocaine and prostitutes so what's your point???

My point, is that if the traditional action was SOOOO unsafe, the market would not exist. Not in these litigious times.

Safety is between the ears, period. If you don't want to take the necessary precautions for handling a traditional action.....don't buy one.
 

CraigC

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Yeah well, unfortunately the user is not the only safety concern with automobiles. The problem is everybody else. ALL you have to worry about with a traditional sixgun is carrying the sixgun with the hammer down on an empty chamber. Do it enough and it's completely second nature. If ALL you had to worry about driving a car was ONE THING, the road would be a much safer place. Nope, there are people who just can't drive who have a license to anyway, people on cell phones talking and texting, drunks, people fooling with the stereo, people with poor judgement, people trying to eat, people with poor eyesight and/or hearing, people who learned to drive in Mexico, people in a hurry, people not in a hurry, people who are rude and obnoxious, people who are just pissed off, people ready to snap. Then there is rain, sleet, hail, wind, oil slick, ice, kicked up rocks, gas caps falling off Kenworths, road gators, flat tires, mechanical failures, all the myriad of unforeseen circumstances that can happen at any time.

Versus carrying your sixgun with the hammer down on an empty chamber. :roll:
 

Danjet500

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Gentlemen, my point in this post was not to debate the pros and cons or safeness/non-safeness of Old Models vs New Models. Everyone has their opinions, likes and dislikes and reasons for using one over the other. I happen to own both and like both. I wanted to know the history behind Mr. Ruger's decision. I am going to take hittman's advice and get the book "Ruger and his Guns". Thanks for the spirited discussion.
 

CraigC

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"Ruger and His Guns" is an excellent book and available on the cheap at present. It's definitely worth having.

Before anybody gets bent outta shape about my comments, bear in mind that I have 10 New Model Rugers, including 3 custom guns and 13 traditional single actions including Old Model Rugers, Colt's, USFA's, Uberti's, etc. So I feel rather well qualified to speak about them objectively.
 

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