was it hard to walk away from your home?

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kmoore

Buckeye
Joined
Mar 29, 2017
Messages
1,316
Location
Idaho
Homes I owned and lived in are at number 4. Homes I owned as vacation homes only 2. I had spent time fixing and upkeeping all of them. Raised 2 sons in 3 of them.
All that said each has fond memories, but my view is my life is like a book. When I finished high school, college, worked many temporary jobs, married, divorced, married again. Started a career, transferred to different assignments, retired, started another job. Moved, sold and bought homes as rentals or to live in are all chapters in that book.
When I moved because I wanted to, I never looked back. When I moved because I had to, it was a little emotional.

Some things in our lives, we cannot change be it good or bad. I think when those events happen it's best to not dwell on what we cannot change and literally move on with our life. My last move was a 400mile one way drive and I moved everything myself. Moving from one house to another is a lot of work. Unpacking this last time took weeks longer than I figured.
 

Jack Ryan

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 21, 2012
Messages
199
Location
Indiana
those of you that have downsized know what i mean.
you sell off your guns, extra stuff, donate clothes, hand the keys to the new owners and you stop....turn around....take one last look....and close the door to decades of memories....and head to some retirement shed with just small trinkets to your name.
im about to be that guy to my ct home. im 3rd generation in the house. i have no kids to pass it on to. its going to be exactly what i mentioned above.
how did it go?
glad, sad, eager for a new start?
for those too young to underastand, some day youll be in an antique shop, see something with dust on it and say...hey! i had one of these! and the memories flood back.
Bob, I've downsized the last two homes I've moved to. Now this house is the longest I've ever lived in the same place in my life. That means I STILL have "stuff" in boxed, out in the barn, I've not unboxed since two houses ago. That stuff may as well have been thrown in a dumpster fire 20 years ago for all it is worth NOW after years out in a barn.

Sell it while it is worth something. Sell it, don't move it. Move to something, somewhere YOU WANT TO DO or live. Your trap club comes to mind. Don't over build, build what you want. When you get the "I want mores" buy the land next to you. Resolve never to buy land again that is not on one of your current borders.

Keep the guns.
 

transplant

Bearcat
Joined
Dec 24, 2022
Messages
9
Location
NH
except for the foundation and framing and plumbing, I built our family's home. Cleared 1 1/2 acres of woods for the house. HAD PRIDE in what I built but was never sad about moving until we drove out of the driveway for the last time at night.. Took videos of the cleared out house for the kids. They weren't living there anymore but didn't want us to sell it. In a one story ranch half the size now. A lot less stairs to deal with as we age! Now my wife wants to move cause we're too close to a secondary main road in town, sheesh!
 

bobski

Hunter
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
2,897
Location
Ct., Va., & Vanzant, Mo.
i remember george carlins bit on stuff. and how empty drawers and areas need to have stuff.
he had a point.
lol.
everything about our past lives is of no interest to anyone anymore in the current world.
guns, houses, stuff you name it.

heck i liked the scene in top gun maverick where they stole the F14, and the backseater said...what the heck is all this antique crap!!. (the awg9 phoenix sys?) wow. i worked on that cutting edge technology!
and when mav' said look for the radio breaker....where the backseater asked..mav said, its one of those 300 behind you.
lol.
i REMEMBER those breakers!
just like i remember every letter, present, toy, pen, pencil, on our attic.
its not fair to the new generation to have to know what it all is. i get it. but the transition to old age just isnt fun.
its like you have to bury your stuff before they bury you.
i can remember cleaning out homes of my relatives in the 60s.
heck, homes then had stuff from 1800's. and even then my parents were saying get rid of it. nobody wanted victorian stuff in frank lloyd wright style homes with 50-60's decor.
my uncle had a decade old pieced arrow in his garage. no one wanted it and i was only 10. if only i had a tow truck!
seems every generation goes thru the last generations stuff.
just hard for me to sell or toss grandmas hand knitting of headrests, table tops and table covers. she was good at it. sad to see the mice got some of it. oh well.
 

Hvymax

Blackhawk
Joined
Nov 30, 2022
Messages
852
Location
Maryland
My children learned with guns from their Great Grandparents as well as tools. I spent my career using tools made by my Great Grandfather and hopefully my grands will as well. We need to be curators of our Families stuff and Keep it significant. When it looses significance so do we.
 
Joined
Jan 26, 2009
Messages
1,873
Location
Ragnarok Farm, Iowa
We all downsize to a pine box sooner or later.

Give your stuff away to people that want it and will cherish it while you are still vertical.
Knowing it will be loved takes the sting out of parting with it. And, you'll be doing your kids a big favor!

Keep the guns though. 😁
 
Joined
Nov 5, 2007
Messages
8,296
Location
Dallas, TX
i REMEMBER those breakers!
just like i remember every letter, present, toy, pen, pencil, on our attic.
its not fair to the new generation to have to know what it all is. i get it. but the transition to old age just isnt fun.
What I think you are saying is, you remember what all the old stuff is, but the new generation doesn’t. Is that right?

But times do change? How many times have you posted a picture of some antique asking what it is? Most of that stuff I have no idea at all.

What I’m trying to point out is things change too. I bet if I were transported back in time to my grandparents kitchen, I couldn’t figure out how to cook anything. I wouldn’t know how to turn on the stove or use their toaster or probably even figure out their refrigerator.

Things do change. My wife just bought a blender that will make piping hot soup. It’s controlled with her phone via Bluetooth. I’m sure my grandparents couldn’t figure that out. :)
 
Joined
Jan 26, 2009
Messages
1,873
Location
Ragnarok Farm, Iowa
What I think you are saying is, you remember what all the old stuff is, but the new generation doesn’t. Is that right?

But times do change? How many times have you posted a picture of some antique asking what it is? Most of that stuff I have no idea at all.

What I’m trying to point out is things change too. I bet if I were transported back in time to my grandparents kitchen, I couldn’t figure out how to cook anything. I wouldn’t know how to turn on the stove or use their toaster or probably even figure out their refrigerator.

Things do change. My wife just bought a blender that will make piping hot soup. It’s controlled with her phone via Bluetooth. I’m sure my grandparents couldn’t figure that out. :)
I'm with them. Technology is the bane of mankind, IMO.
 

redhawker

Buckeye
Joined
May 23, 2009
Messages
1,529
Location
Communist America (escape planned soon)
We bought our home with the intention that they'd carry us out feet first to the mortuary in the end. Now, thanks to those democrat (multiple expletives 'cause I don't want to get banned) in charge in this now (multiple expletives) state our only son and his family, our only grandchildren, now live 2400 miles away from us. We plan to join them this summer. It will be hard to turn over the keys only because of the original intent when we bought the house, the fact that our son was raised in this house, and because we spent a lot of time and money fixing things and remodeling to make it our forever home. The easy part will be, once we turn around from that last look, fleeing this screwed-up state as fast as we can get our butts over the state line.
 

Bear Paw Jack

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 19, 2001
Messages
9,654
Location
Alaska, Idaho USA
Over September and October we got rid of what we could, and packed up the rest and moved almost 3000 miles. In our new home, they each get smaller. This one’s a little over 1400 sf. A lot of stuff went into the garage and this spring I’ll have to unpack that stuff. Ammo boxes get heavy.
I had thought our last house would have been the last house. Apparently not. I’m expecting to die in this one, whatever it takes to not have to move again. We paid people to pack us up, which was easier than us doing it, but it didn’t make moving back in much easier. Not to mention how expensive it was. But we are finally back near family, and that’s what’s important.
 

sheepdawg

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 2, 2011
Messages
112
Location
The hills of North Georgia
After 24 years it really wasn't tough. Sold 6 rifles I never shot, furniture I looked at as a kid, visited Dixie and Angel's graves one last time and moved 450 miles east to the hills of North Georgia. I moved from Memphis and the gunfire had become an everyday thing. I have. great neighbors, an acre on top of a hill and various wild critters to amuse me.
 

tulsamal

Blackhawk
Joined
Apr 30, 2005
Messages
942
Location
Vinita, OK
The wife retires from the corporate world in one year and three months. We’ve been traveling back and forth to Guanajuato and San Miguel de Allende in Mexico and Cuenca in Ecuador… trying to pick between them. I absolutely love Cuenca but she likes being able to drive down to Mexico.

Anyway, we moved to our rural NE Oklahoma 1947 farm house and 90 acres back in 1999. Both our children went from infancy to adulthood here. But it does feel like it is time for our Third Act… so many houses out here in the country have very senior citizens in them… no real visitors, the flicker of TV at night… until the very end when they end up in the local nursing home. All their property and personal stuff up for auction. I don’t really want to do that.

Whether it is Mexico or Ecuador… no guns. So I plan to pass out any family heirlooms I can… sell the rest. Many of them I saw as long term investments anyway. I would rather spend the money myself.

The wife says we will both stand at the gate, look back at the house, and cry the last time we leave. I’m sure that’s true.
 

Ka6otm

Blackhawk
Joined
Dec 21, 2002
Messages
645
I won't be doing that. I'll stay at the house and hire people to come and help me out/take care of me.
 
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