Uses of WD-40

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vito

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Northern Illinois
Thought this was worth sharing:


What Is The Main Ingredient of WD-40?
Before you read to the end, does anybody know what the main ingredient of WD-40?


I had a neighbor who bought a new pickup.
I got up very early one Sunday morning and saw that someone had spray painted red all around the sides of this beige truck (for some unknown reason).

I went over, woke him up, and told him the bad news.
He was very upset and was trying to figure out what to do....
probably nothing until Monday morning, since nothing was open.
Another neighbor came out and told him to get his WD-40 and clean it off.

It removed the unwanted paint beautifully and did not harm his paint job that was on the truck. I was impressed!


WD-40 who knew?
"Water Displacement #40".
The product began from a search for a rust preventative solvent and degreaser to protect missile parts.

WD-40 was created in 1953, by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket Chemical Company.
Its name comes from the project that was to find a 'Water Displacement' Compound.
They were finally successful for a formulation, with their fortieth attempt, thus WD-40.

The 'Convair Company' bought it in bulk to protect their atlas missile parts.
Ken East (one of the original founders) says there is nothing in WD-40 that would hurt you.
When you read the 'shower door' part, try it.

It's the first thing that has ever cleaned that spotty shower door.
If yours is plastic, it works just as well as on glass.
It's a miracle!
Then try it on your stove-top.
It's now shinier than it's ever been.

You'll be amazed.


WD-40 Uses:
1. Protects silver from tarnishing.
2. Removes road tar and grime from cars.
3. Cleans and lubricates guitar strings.

4. Gives floor that 'just-waxed' sheen without making them slippery.
5. Keeps the flies off of Cows, Horses, and other Farm Critters, as well. (Ya gotta love this one!!!)
6. Restores and cleans chalkboards.
7. Removes lipstick stains.
8. Loosens stubborn zippers.
9. Untangles jewelry chains.
10. Removes stains from stainless steel sinks.
11. Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill.
12. Keeps ceramic / terracotta garden pots from oxidizing.

13. Removes tomato stains from clothing.
14. Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots.
15. Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors.
16. Keeps scissors working smoothly.
17. Lubricates noisy door hinges on both home and vehicles doors..

18. It removes that nasty tar and scuff marks from the kitchen flooring.
It doesn't seem to harm the finish and you won't have to scrub nearly as hard to get them off.
Just remember to open some windows if you have a lot of marks.

19. Remove those nasty Bug guts that will eat away the finish on your car if not removed quickly!
20. Gives a children's playground gym slide a shine for a super fast slide.
21. Lubricates gearshift and mower deck lever for ease of handling on riding mowers...

22. Rids kids rocking chair and swings of squeaky noises.
23. Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open.
24. Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close.
25. Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards in vehicles, as well as vinyl bumpers.

26. Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles.
27. Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans.
28. Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons, and bicycles for easy handling.
29. Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly.

30. Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools.
31. Removes grease splatters from stove-tops.
32. Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging.
33. Lubricates prosthetic limbs.
34. Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell).

35. Removes all traces of duct tape.
36. Folks even spray it on their arms, hands, and knees to relieve arthritis pain.
37. Florida's favorite use is: 'cleans and removes love bugs from grills and bumpers.'

38. The favorite use in the state of New York, it protects the Statue of Liberty from the elements.
39. WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a little on live bait or lures and you will be catching the big one in no time. Also, it's a lot cheaper than the chemical attractants that are made for just that purpose.

Keep in mind though, using some chemical laced baits or lures for fishing are not allowed in some states.
40. Use it for fire ant bites. It takes the sting away immediately and stops the itch.
41. It is great for removing crayon from walls. Spray it on the marks and wipe with a clean rag.

42. Also, if you've discovered that your teenage daughter has washed and dried a tube of lipstick with a load of laundry, saturate the lipstick spots with WD-40 and rewash. Presto! The lipstick is gone!
43. If you spray it inside a wet distributor cap, it will displace the moisture, allowing the engine to start.


P.S.
As for that Basic, Main Ingredient.......
Well.... it's FISH OIL....


Now This Is Definitely Worth SHARING!!
 

5of7

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I have used WD40 on my guns for 45 years now, and it is the best rust inhibitor I have ever found. It is also great for lubrication of trigger mechanisms if applied right. Spray it into the trigger group and then blow out the excess with air. Cleans and lubes at the same time. 8)
 

Jimbo357mag

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WD-40 is not a good lubricant for fine parts. It will gum up locks and model airplane engines. I would not use it on gun parts as there are better oils available. It will penetrate and loosen rusted or frozen parts but should be followed by a good oil for lubrication.
 

kmoore

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#39 is why many fisherman carry it. Funny I had a guy tell me that US Coast Guard would cite me for using it because it contains oil. I said yeah, fish oil. I believe there might be some petroleum in it but, not sure.
 

#1rugerman

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Auburn, Alabama, usa
Had a friend who had a Browning Sweet 16, every year he went to South America to shoot doves, the shells down there were real dirty and when his gun started jamming he would squirt WD-40 in the action. Due to the dirty shells, WD-40 and the heat from firing so many shells when he got back the action would be super gummed up. I would dismantle it, soak the action in mineral spirits to get the gum out then lube it til the next time he went south. Yes WD-40 does gum up if used in quantity, a little doesn't seem to be a problem, but a lot is asking for problems.
 

Big Old Boy

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I have a friend who builds rat rods and he uses it as a polish on the rat rods that he does not paint keeps it shiny and no rust .
 

mikewriter

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Had an old Toyota pickup with a cracked distributor cap that I drove that way for awhile. In wet weather when it started missing I'd spray WD-40 on the cap and it DID stop the miss.

Mike
 

Bull Barrel

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From the MSDS sheet:

50% "aliphatic hydrocarbons". The manufacturer's website claims this ratio in the current formulation cannot accurately be described as Stoddard solvent, a similar mixture of hydrocarbons.[13]
<25% petroleum base oil. Presumably a mineral oil or light lubricating oil.
12–18% low vapor pressure aliphatic hydrocarbon. Reduces the liquid's viscosity so that it can be used in aerosols. The hydrocarbon evaporates during application.
2–3% carbon dioxide. A propellant which is now used instead of the original liquefied petroleum gas to reduce WD-40's flammability.
<10% inert ingredients.
The German version of the mandatory EU safety sheet lists the following safety-relevant ingredients:

60–80% hydrogen-treated heavy naphtha (a petroleum product used in wick-type cigarette lighters)
1–5% carbon dioxide
 

5of7

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Jimbo357mag said:
WD-40 is not a good lubricant for fine parts. It will gum up locks and model airplane engines. I would not use it on gun parts as there are better oils available. It will penetrate and loosen rusted or frozen parts but should be followed by a good oil for lubrication.

The secret to preventing this is to follow up spraying WD40 into intricate mechanisms with compressed air. That blows out the excess and leaves the parts lubricated by a film that is .0001" thick. Believe me it works, I have been doing this with WD40 for 45 years. Since 1972 when I first encountered it. 8)
 

coach

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Over the years after seeing things rust or gum up from using wd40, I now only use it to dry metal before wiping it clean and oiling it if needed. I call BS on most of the original list of uses. The only real reason I still have a can of it is because its cheap and available everywhere.
 
Joined
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pros and cons all over the interent, and some real wives tales,,,,but I have found out for me,and I use it ALL the time, is the WD-40 you get in 'bulk' and put in a pump spray bottle does NOT "gum up and fubar things like anything the propellants used to push it out of the aerosol spray cans.......the bulk is just fine and we've used in all the shops I had as well as other I worked at or for...bottom line is YOU use what YOU like and want to use and works for YOU...............me I'll stick with many of the things that are on the 'Haz Mat ' list and WORKS for us..........as well as simple cheap stuff like kerosene, and mineral spirits,,,,they ALL have their uses....... 8)
 

Busterswoodshop

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Sonoran Desert Az.
I have used WD-40 as long as I can remember and have never seen any of the horror stories you hear about it.

I use it for everything from lubricant to hand cleaner.

I think WD-40 and duct tape are two of the greatest inventions out there.
If it doesn't move and you want it too , use WD-40
If it moves and you don't want it too , use duct tape.
 

Bob Wright

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Memphis, TN USA
Big Old Boy said:
I have a friend who builds rat rods and he uses it as a polish on the rat rods that he does not paint keeps it shiny and no rust .

Of what, pray tell, use is a rat rod? And why would you want it shiny?

Do you beat a rat to death with one? Those green tablets often leave rats dying, but I finish them off with a .22.

Bob Wright
 

Jimbo357mag

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Here you go Mr. Wright.

https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=A0LEVvqxWl5Z1EEAAjwPxQt.;_ylu=X3oDMTByMjB0aG5zBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzYw--?p=rat+rod&fr=yhs-avg-fh_lsonsw&hspart=avg&hsimp=yhs-fh_lsonsw
 

coach

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Funny you should ask. I just googled it and this is from hotrodsonline.
"The rat rod is an acquired taste, a vehicle with the rust accentuated and the road patina honed. While the classic hot rod is painted and chromed, the rat rod revels in the weathering. That doesn’t mean less power in your T-Bucket, or fewer engine mods in your Chevy C10. Instead, it means that those classic trucks, coupes, roadsters or sedans are rocking the rust as they barrel down the strip. Hot Rod Hotline has the rat rod listings you’re looking for, whether they’re converted barn finds, or modern marvels of classic engineering, complete with the attitude and style that defines this hot rod subculture."
It seems rust and rat rods go together.
 
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