unheralded guns................

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Bob Wright

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Unheralded Guns? Is that appropriated terminology?

I've spent most of my life using, yearning for, shooting, and building the finer guns with the big bark, like the Colt New Service, Smith Model 29, and Super Blackhawks. Always looking for the best looking, and best shooting, long range type of stuff. But, here lately, been sort of looking out for the lesser known, lesser desired things.

The post about the .32 H&R for example. The gun you see pocketed or passed from hand to hand in the movies. The type of gun that would be used by the non-gun-savvy, finish worn off, grab-it-from-the-bedside table-and jam it into the waistband of your pants type of gun.

Got anything like this? If so, how about posting a photo?

Bob Wright
 

Bob Wright

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Lee Martin":1whie29q said:
I always thought Colt Cobras fit that bill. One of these days I'm going to buy one (preferably from the 50's with character wear).

Yeah, well, I was sort of thinkin' of older guns. But while I never cared for the Cobra, did like its steel next-of kin, the Dectective Special.

But I had somethin less elegant in mind, such as the old Webley, or the Iver Johnson .44's

Remember the old IJ .44, where the rear of the cylinder swung out and you pushed the cylinder down on the quill to extract empties? Or any of the old Bulldog revolvers, for that matter.

Bob Wright
 

Bob Wright

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Wow! Since startin this thread, a flood of memories have come to me.

I especially remember visting rural Tennessee homes with my mother when I was a boy. Every living room had the lady's chair near the window, with a round table next to it. A lamp, either a plain kerosene lamp or an Aladdin lamp, stood in the center of the table, think these were called drum tables. On the table usually were her Bible, and on top of it, some sort of revolver. If not on her Bible, then in a drawer in the table. More often than not, the gun was a top-break of some sort.

And, my widowed aunt's response to a suspected prowler: "If there's a man out there, come in, or I'll shoot." I believe her gun was a Colt Army Special.

Bob Wright
 

two bit okie

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howes about a 2" smith victory model from the ww2 days, with the brit proof marks? I got one of those myself. 38 spec.
 

Snake45

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About 20 years or more ago I bought, for about $50, a Squires-Bingham SB-20 semiauto .22 rifle. Never shot it until about five years ago, when I discovered to my surprise that it functions 100% and thinks that Remington Golden Bullets are Ely Tenex. :shock:

The stock is very awkward feeling and the whole thing is so ugly that my camera refuses to take a picture of it but oh my that stupid thing will shoot. I put a Williams receiver peep sight on it, which is a huge improvement over the issue open sight.

In similar vein, I have an old ERMA-EXCAM RX-22, which is a cheap ($85 brand new in the '80s) lookalike of the Walther PPK. I also have a real PPK in .22 and the ERMA-EXCAM is just as reliable, just as accurate (if not more so), and has a better trigger pull and better sights. Go figger.
 

6GUNSONLY

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Alabama, in the bend of the Tennessee River
I have a picture of a great-great uncle of mine posing for a picture and he has what appears to be a S&W safety hammerless or similar revolver tucked in his waistband. He's a serious-lookin' dude. I'll have to see if I can scan that pic so I can post it here.
 

bub

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NE Ohio
When the neighborhood they lived in Lexington, KY, started getting bad, my maternal grandfather bought a used .32 revolver, I think it was an H&R. Regardless, it was cheap but all he could afford at the time. Luckily, he never had to use the gun, but according to my grandmother, he kept it loaded and ready to go in case someone broke in. Despite my trying to get him to get something better, my dad currently has that gun and keeps it in his hanky drawer in his dresser, loaded and ready to go. It's not the best gun in the world, it's not flashy or fancy, but it is working on giving it's second family (at least) piece of mind when something goes bump in the night.

Bub
 

gb6491

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Foothills of the Gila Mountains, SW Arizona.
I think my old Police Positive Special might fit in here:
2044ci.jpg

...maybe my H&R 922 as well:
30sbymx.jpg

The stag is a recent addition to the old Colt, for years it looked like this.
Regards,
Greg
 

btrumanj

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Jan 29, 2005
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Location
Louisville Ky
When younger i had a couple of older H&R .22s. Carried in hunting coat pocket or tackle box and actually shot pretty good. kinda wish I wish I still had them. Here's a Rossi that I carry when working in the yard. Aint worth much but it works and shoots right well. The little Armi Galesi .25 might work for some folks but I'm not a fan of .25s. The model 10 made in 1969 might come close to the guns you speak of. Not pristine like some I see posted on gun forums, it's dinged and scratched with worn bluing . A police confiscated gun bought from a dealer, it's been around. It's still tight and shoots where I point it. I still carry it occasionally.



 

M'BOGO

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Bob Wright":1if8cvvg said:
Wow! Since startin this thread, a flood of memories have come to me.

I especially remember visting rural Tennessee homes with my mother when I was a boy. Every living room had the lady's chair near the window, with a round table next to it. A lamp, either a plain kerosene lamp or an Aladdin lamp, stood in the center of the table, think these were called drum tables. On the table usually were her Bible, and on top of it, some sort of revolver. If not on her Bible, then in a drawer in the table. More often than not, the gun was a top-break of some sort.

And, my widowed aunt's response to a suspected prowler: "If there's a man out there, come in, or I'll shoot." I believe her gun was a Colt Army Special.
Bob Wright

I suspect the pistols were kept in hollowed books (Crossville, TN, my maternal grandmother's, I understand there were 22 or so around). There was an older scoped rifle in the corner by the kitchen table (never touched them, or else). I remember eating breakfast, and my grandmother's husband grumbling, and sliding the screen up, the rifle was in hand and the safety clicked off. Crack, and one less dog in the world to mess with the chickens and eggs.
 

Colonel Daddy

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Don't know about cheap. I paid $100 for it in 1975. My 1917 Colt .45 DA might fit the bill. Still shoot it sometimes with some light .45AR loads...............NEVER with current ACP loads!

Also, always wanted one of those RIC .455 Webleys in nice condition. Never found it :(
 

Bob Wright

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Colonel Daddy":1wu5e6pp said:
Don't know about cheap. I paid $100 for it in 1975. My 1917 Colt .45 DA might fit the bill. Still shoot it sometimes with some light .45AR loads...............NEVER with current ACP loads!

Also, always wanted one of those RIC .455 Webleys in nice condition. Never found it :(

As to the RIC's, I remember them as being very cheap, under $10 often. Many had their chambers and bores lined and chambered for .25-20 Win.

My own Colt .45 was a commercial New Service Canadian Mounties gun originally in .455 then rebored to .45 Colt. It became my first custom gun, a .44 Special. Cost to me was $34.95, as I specified "select condition," which added $5.00.

Bob Wright
 
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