Ubuntu & Linux ? May I ask a couple of naive questions?

Help Support Ruger Forum:

yooper1

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 28, 2009
Messages
467
Location
U. P. of MI.
On the MS Windows 10 free update thread a few people mentioned Linux and Ubuntu.

I would like to try one or maybe both but before I do something that I regret and maybe makes my windows machine useless I have a couple of questions.

Like:

- Does either actually remove the windows on a machine and then replace it?

- Have any of you tried it but then found that you did not like it and then have gone back to Windows?

- Is e-mail hard to set up on those OS?

- Do they have a way to still view videos and maybe access some online games like java or flash games?

Thanks in advance for any info you supply. :)
 

Selena

Hunter
Joined
Sep 13, 2013
Messages
2,948
Location
A long way from heaven and far too close to Chicag
It's possible to have Linux boot up from a jump drive leaving your Windozes intact. There are a number of browsers and e-mail for Linux and just as easy and Windoze. Again, Linux has a number of utilities for video and there is a compatible Java, not sure about Flash however.
 

yooper1

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 28, 2009
Messages
467
Location
U. P. of MI.
Thanks.

I should have included this question in the orig post.

Is it something that works by partitioning my hard drive and then fiddling with the the bios to start up on Linux or Ubuntu and not Windows?

I seem to recall that was what was done many years ago when Linux came out
 

Salmoneye

Single-Sixer
Joined
Mar 19, 2012
Messages
479
Location
Vermont
You can boot many Linux distributions from CD, DVD, or flash drives (dLive Boot), and never leave any sign on your computer that it was there...This allows you to test drive them in order to see if Linux is for you...

You can also pretty easily Dual Boot a Linux version along side Windows, but it is a tad more technical than live booting...Linux can install a boot loader that will give you the choice of which operating system to boot when you start the machine...Linux can also handle the repartitioning for you when installing along side Windows...
 

Pat-inCO

Hawkeye
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
5,922
Location
In the AZ oven (Phoenix basin)
:D Hitch up your socks Mable, here he goes again. :wink: . :D

I did the winderz Linux conversion almost nine years ago. From what I
experienced and have seen from others, I have a few suggestions.

Try-it-you-will-like-it:
There are MANY distributions of Linux (flavors, if you will) that allow
you to boot up Linux and operate in Linux, without changing ANYTHING
on your existing system. Phrased another way, should you not like Linux
you will simply shut off your machine, then turn it back on and be right
where you were before trying Linux. Read the instructions for the
distribution you select (Mint is a good one to start with, or Ubuntu) for
specifics of how to do that.

Dual boot:
There are many people that swear by dual boot (you can boot up either
winderz or Linux). There are at least as many that swear AT dual boot.
My suggestion is to purchase another hard drive and allocate all of it to
Linux. By doing that, you can put the "old" HD as the logical "D" drive
and access ALL of the information on it. Linux understands winderz
data format, but winderz does NOT understand Linux format.

How long does it take:
I can only go by what I've experienced, but I have taken more than one
computer to fully operational on Linux, including E-mail and several
other options, in twenty minutes. In fact the second time I was more
confident, and it took more like fifteen minutes. :D

What does I does:
First is to build, or buy, a "live CD". The full instructions are easily
available on many web sites. I'll add here that Mint is a very easy one
to start with. It runs a version of Ubuntu and has a set of instructions
that are hard to mess up. :D

Once you have the "Live CD" (OR live USB) you simply put it in the
system, boot from it (see the instructions on how), answer the questions
they ask, and Golly-Gee-Whiz Phred, you are on Linux.

One other suggestion: BE SURE you write down all of your E-mail
settings, copy off your bookmarks/favorites, and all external passwords.
You can recover from not doing this, but it will be a tedious process.
- - - I suggest a text file with all of that information in it.
- - - Then PRINT it. :D

Hope that answers your questions.
 

yooper1

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 28, 2009
Messages
467
Location
U. P. of MI.
Ok, sounds good.

thank you for the info

I will need to think it over.

I have this newer Dell, but I am unhappy with it and Windows 10. Plus it ia a 15 inch screen

I also have a 17 inch Dell with Windows 8.1 on it. So I do have almost all of the passwords, account settings, url's, etc saved there on a text document

So I just have to pick and choose and do it, but that will be after thinking. And today, thinking is hurting me. (chronic headaches that decided to show up today while reporting for jury duty...which I was dismissed from)
 

NikA

Buckeye
Joined
Nov 2, 2014
Messages
1,534
Location
Yrisarri, NM- high in the Manzanos
There is another option, commonly used by individuals that need both Windows and Linux functionalities: creating a virtual machine. Essentially, this is just dedicating a portion of the system resources to running an OS within your OS.

Easily accomplished by installing VirtualBox (free but well supported for enterprise), downloading any Linux distribution .iso file, and pointing VirtualBox to it's location. Can also be used to run Windows on a Linux machine.

I'm pretty firmly in the Linux camp, but if I need compatibility, a virtual machine is the way to go.
 

wheelgun1958

Blackhawk
Joined
Aug 1, 2009
Messages
937
Location
Flo, TX
There are many derivatives of Linux, one of which is Ubuntu. I have Linux Mint dual booted on my laptop. It does everything you would expect of a computer. Most Linux version websites will walk you through a successful install. The beauty of Linux is it doesn't nag you to update if you don't want to. There are some viruses written for Linux, but they are few in number.
 

sncup

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 18, 2016
Messages
126
Location
Wisconsin
Try before you buy as they say. Download linux and install it on a flash drive. A simple 8gb drive is fine. Even better if it is USB 3 rated.
Boot to the flash drive and run your computer. It will not have email set up but that will come late. Verify you can connect to the internet, verify your Wifi works if the machine has Wifi. Verify audio works. If all is well then seriously consider using Linux as the operation system for your machine. You can always switch back by simply switching disk drives for the drive holding Windows. You can also purchase a external drive holder to put your windows disk in and access that from Linux to share /store your information.

I second the using a separate boot device for linux instead of dual booting. You can buy a SSD instead of a disk drive that is seriously faster than a disk drive, You can buy a boot SSD for less than $100.

So load Linux, onto the the SSD and replace the disk drive from your laptop with the SSD.
Your machine will be faster, and probably more stable.

https://linuxmint.com/

https://www.newegg.com/SSDs/Category/ID-119

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147372
 

Pat-inCO

Hawkeye
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
5,922
Location
In the AZ oven (Phoenix basin)
sncup said:
Your machine will be faster, and probably more stable.
Have to agree there.

As far as space required on your HD, my computer came with a 1T drive
and I am all the way up to 3% (yes Virginia, three percent) and that is
with over 6Gig of pure user data.

You will also find that Linux allows you to do your backups without having
the operating system try to save space. I can do a full user data backup
in fifteen minutes, for the first copy, and in less than ten for the second.

Security:
When I converted to Linux there was one guy that said there would be
as many virus in a year that Linux would be just as bad as winderz. Well,
after nine years of running without a firewall, I can honestly say I disagree.

The only chunk of extra code I run is Adblock Plus. I run that to keep
most of the ad's away. It . . . does . . . cause some web sites to barf,
but I don't care. If they want me to look at what they have, they can
remove their requirement of no AdBlock. :roll:

:wink: . :D
 

nlocke

Bearcat
Joined
Sep 26, 2013
Messages
39
Location
West Virginia
My son installed Linux on my laptop with one added feature. He also installed windows in Linux by use of a program called "Oracle VM Virtual Box". I have several programs that have problems with Linux but I can switch to windows to run them.
 

Pat-inCO

Hawkeye
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
5,922
Location
In the AZ oven (Phoenix basin)
One of the options is where you put your "Task Bar", which is an
assortment of icons for programs you frequently use. I opted to put mine
vertically on the Left side of the Desktop. You can add or delete entries
very easily, as you prefer.

One question you asked, but I did not answer (and I don't see one from
others) is "what programs does it have?" There is an option for your task
bar of "Synaptic Package Manager" which is a list of all supported
program packages. In the list, any that you already have installed will
have the "select" button colored green. Any that are available that you
do not have, simply have an empty button. Options for Synaptic are
add, reinstall and delete. Once you have selected all you care to, there
is a button in the top that says "apply". It will install, update or remove
all that you have indicated you want action taken on.

As an oh-by-the-way, most people keep an icon for search (of what you
have installed) and settings, so you can go directly to set/reset parameters
in their task bar. Makes it a lot easier to find things, and saves a LOT of
frustration (WHERE did I find that?). :D

Sounds like a HUGE amount to think about or learn, but the majority of
it will become second nature as you begin to use them. 8)
 

markallen

Bearcat
Joined
Nov 22, 2008
Messages
92
Location
North east Ohio
Take a look at Linux Mint Cinnamon. It's based on Ubuntu. Looks like Windows 10, but works with the ease of Windows XP.
I was concerned with switching to Linux, since I had only used Windows. I hate and I mean HATE Windows 10. Especially the spying by Microsoft. They can take Cortana and shove it.
I went hard core. No dual boot, no partition, I did a full fresh install in March...I love it. I have had ZERO issues with the Mint.
It works each and every time, doesn't freeze, and since it works like what I have used in the past I can find things.
I never could figure out how to burn a data dvd using Windows 10.
 

ditto1958

Blackhawk
Joined
Jun 23, 2012
Messages
567
Location
Wisconsin
OP, I used to put Linux on my computers. I never became anything close to an expert with Linux, but I enjoyed using it. As I recall, I would do it as a dual boot. When I turned the machine on, I would be given the option to boot up Windows or Linux. They existed side-by-side on the computer.

I was always able to do pretty much whatever I wanted with Linux. I expect that these days compatibility should be even better than it was a few years ago.

I stopped using Linux mainly because recent versions of Windows have become stable. The frequent crashes we loved to hate with Win 95 and 98 have almost become distant memories.
 

yooper1

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 28, 2009
Messages
467
Location
U. P. of MI.
Well, so far I have decided to try it.

I saw directions (one of many) to download the ISO file to a DVD and then run from that. I was too cheap to go buy a blank DVD. (yes, I know....most people would have them). So I did have blank CDr's. They were 700 MB in size.

The ISO is 1.6 GB or something.

I only realized they were too small after the download stopped and gave an error of "disk full" or something like that.

Oh well, maybe later this week. Or next month etc

;)
 

NikA

Buckeye
Joined
Nov 2, 2014
Messages
1,534
Location
Yrisarri, NM- high in the Manzanos
If you want to try it for free now, VirtualBox is still an option that won't require an addtional boot media. You will need a disc or flash drive if you want to convert completely, but you could have a VM running Linux on your machine in an hour with VirtualBox and that ISO.

ETA: If you want, PM me you address and I will send you a clean flash drive to put the ISO on. I just cleaned a pile of them when I moved and started using my desktop again.
 

Pat-inCO

Hawkeye
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
5,922
Location
In the AZ oven (Phoenix basin)
NikA said:
If you want to try it for free now, VirtualBox is still an option that
won't require an addtional boot media.
If he doesn't have a free CD to copy to, how about we keep him headed
in to the simplest path?

VM Box said:
Update Nov 3 2017: The Guest Additions image with the 5.2.0 release
had problems with a number of Linux guest systems. Please try this
image which we believe fixes several of these.
Doesn't sound to me like a good starting point for someone not fully
versed in geek speak.
 

NikA

Buckeye
Joined
Nov 2, 2014
Messages
1,534
Location
Yrisarri, NM- high in the Manzanos
Pat-inCO: PM'ed you on this issue. Really don't think it would be a problem for a trial run of a Linux OS w/ VirtualBox. For the objective of try-before-you-buy, would still recommend VirtualBox with any downloadable Linux ISO.
 

Latest posts

Top