Twist rate 45 colt

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jronald

Bearcat
Joined
Sep 15, 2009
Messages
22
What is the twist rate in a 45 Colt Bisley made by Ruger. Thinking of re-barreling the Bisley with better control of the bore diameter.
 

7p's

Single-Sixer
Joined
Sep 21, 2009
Messages
189
Location
North Dakota
Good question - I haven't been able to get 240 to 265 grain bullets to shoot well with a 1 in 24 twist in a FA. It will shoot 325 grain bullets fairly well at 1,100fps. I have a BFR454 with 1 in 16 and it handles 240 to 265 grains much better than the 1 in 24 twist in 45 Colt. The 325 grain bullet shoots a tad better in the 1 in 24 twist but you need to push it a little, as it starts coming on around the 1,000fps mark.
 

BearHawk 357

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 18, 2010
Messages
249
Location
Ohio
1 in 16

If you are gonna rebarrel go with a slower twist if you like heavy bullets.

Now, I know that in the AR-15 community that the HEAVIER bullets generally do best in the barrels with a FASTER twist rate. Example: the recomendation for a 1/9" is 40 to 55 grains.....the recomendation for a 1/7" barrel is 60-75 grains. In a rifle, it isn't so much the weight of the bullet that has an effect on bullet stabilization as is the length of the bullet. However, since there is a direct correlation between weight and length we just use weight as the catalyst (or control) when speaking of these matters. Afterall you rarely read bullet length specs on the side of an ammo box.....just grain weight.

So, I have a question for you guys who really know your revolvers. How is this concept different when applied to the twist rate to bullet weight (or more accurately, bullet length) ratios? I'm having a hard time wrapping my brain around this one. I don't mean to hijack this thread but the twist rate comments have got me confused.
 

Pinecone

Blackhawk
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Jan 29, 2007
Messages
970
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Maine
BearHawk 357, You need to "factor" in a very important ingredient when you start comparing twist rate, bullet weight, bullet shape/length, and that ingredient is "velocity", probably the most "important" factor when comparing gun to gun.......................Dick :wink:
 

CraigC

Hawkeye
Joined
May 27, 2002
Messages
5,197
Location
West Tennessee
Yep, and with full house loads in the custom five-shooters (think 50,000psi), the slower twist slightly lowers pressures. Bear in mind it's not a huge change, only from 1-16" to 1-20" if memory serves. Most .44 and .45 rifles have a very slow twist rate, 1-36" or 1-38".
 

BearHawk 357

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 18, 2010
Messages
249
Location
Ohio
Pinecone,

I respectfully disagree with you about velocity being the most important factor when comparing the effect on twist rate vs. bullet weight (especially in regards to stabilization). I can give you an example.

If you shoot a 77 grain .223 bullet out of a barrel with a 1/12" twist rate then this bullet will not be as stabilized as compared to if it were shot out of a barrel with a faster twist rate (especially at longer distances)....this is a common fact. A 77 grain .223 round does best out of a faster twist rate....this is also a general fact. The same goes for a 40 grain working best out of a slower twist rate.

However, it is not the velocity of the round that is dictating it's stability. It is the length of the round, most specifically, that is effecting stability. The longer the bullet the faster the twist needs to be in order to keep the bullet from becoming unsettled in flight. However, since bullets are not listed on ammo boxes by length then we use the direct correlation between length and weight and we just use weight as the catalyst or the control in the equation.

Every AR-15 owner eventually learns this formula and uses this information to match up ammunition with thier particular barrel's twist rate. My question is: Why is this not the case with revolvers (as some of the above comments are indicating)? If a fast twist always compliments a heavier bullet (within that caliber's weight range) in a rifle, then why is it the opposite case in a revolver? This doesn't make sense to me.

Just stating that velocity is an important factor without stating "in which direction" or "to what extent" just kind of muddies up the discussion if you ask me. I'm not arguing your statement. I'm just not following how I can extract any practical logic out of what you have said.

If you had said, "barrel length will effect velocity, grain weight effects velocity, velocity effects energy transfer or powder charge effects velocity" then I would have said that I agree with you. However, this is not quite the topic of the discussion.

Twist rate vs. bullet weight (length) in a revolver....that is the question, that I had asked the others about.
 

Bucks Owin

Hunter
Joined
Mar 22, 2004
Messages
3,190
Location
51st state of Jefferson
I expect the issue is better accuracy with lighter bullets in a Linebaugh custom, not anything to do with pressures. (not to mention, Douglas makes nice barrels!)...1/16 twist "seems" to favor heavier bullets once you light a serious fire in the .45 BH. I've found accy with lighter bullets suffers (very slightly) at Linebaugh velocities with the stock Ruger. The 300+ gr seem to get more accurate the faster you drive them. I wouldn't be too quick to change that Bisley barrel if you intend to stay with the heavies...JMO (but it's free!) :wink:
 

Pinecone

Blackhawk
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
Messages
970
Location
Maine
BearHawk357, That's what make these "forums" so great! We can agree to disagree as "experience" with various individuals will differ according to years and time spent working with various firearms...........................Dick :wink:
 

Aggie01

Blackhawk
Joined
Oct 16, 2008
Messages
968
Location
Texas (DFW)
Don't try to compare high velocity rifles and heavy caliber handguns.
They are different animals.

FA uses a 1 in 24" twist in their .454's.

Hamilton Bowen has clearwater reboring do a 1 in 18" on .45 colt ( and .475/.500) rebores.

1 in 16" was the for the original 230-270 grain for .45 ACP & BP .45 Colt.

The only time I even think about twist rate is conversations like this.
 

7p's

Single-Sixer
Joined
Sep 21, 2009
Messages
189
Location
North Dakota
Playing with the FA model 97 - I've just discovered you have to push the short light weight bullets pretty hard in a slow twist to start getting acceptable accuracy at 25 yards - haven't found out yet if it will hold the accuracy to 50 & 100 yards yet. Next time out I’ll see what this load does at the farther distances. For a 240 grain jacketed bullet you need to push 1,400fps and better using a 1 in 24 twist, at least for my model 97.
 

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