Transfering..data

Help Support Ruger Forum:

longspurr

Single-Sixer
Joined
Apr 25, 2010
Messages
131
Location
Wisconsin USA
It used to be that you put the info on one floppy disk and read the disk on the 2nd computer. It was called "sneaker net" These days you put files+folders+photo's on a USB3 flash drive and walk it to the 2nd computer.

There is a more HI tech way of attaching them both to the same router via ethernet wires and put the files+folders into a special "shared folder" on each device. And yes you can probably do this wirelessly as well.
 

Hugh

Buckeye
Joined
May 29, 2008
Messages
1,139
Location
West Jordan, Utah
Periodically, once every month or so, I copy all of my picture and document files to a thumb drive; just in case. That way they are preserved, and it doesn't take a system backup drive. It takes just a few minutes to copy them and if they are ever lost on my hard drive I can always copy them back from the thumb drive. I don't worry about any other material on my hard drive.
 

Pat-inCO

Hawkeye
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
5,922
Location
In the AZ oven (Phoenix basin)
I guess it's because I went with Linux, but I prefer the thumb drive method.
You can get 32G micro SD cards and use an adaptor for them, so you just
plug it into the USB port (adaptors run from $1.50 to $3 each).

Amazon has the class 10 32G SD for $12 each. At that price you can have as
many as you care to for backups.

With the class 10 SDs I typically get transfer rates in the 10-15 Meg/second,
and I can back up 6G of data in about fifteen minutes.

P.S. Since you are using "copy" rather than backup, you will not have
problems with the backup software tracking everything you have on
your system.
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2004
Messages
2,791
Location
Granbury, TX. USA
Just hire an IT professional with certification and guaranteed service. If it's important enough, peace of mind is priceless.

Seems like their prices are very reasonable these days, some may even show you how ;-)
 

reloader

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 12, 2015
Messages
148
If your old computer has Windows 7 on it there's a program called Windows Easy Transfer.
If you click the start button on the task bar and type "easy file transfer" a window will pop up and then its just a matter of following the instructions and clicking the next button.

Thumb drives also work great, the newer ones are faster than the older ones.

External hard drives are one of the fastest ways for backing up data though, these days you can pick up a decent size one like 500 gig for about $50. The little Seagate 500 gig external hard drive I picked up at Frys a few years ago just plugs into and runs off of your usb port and does not require its own power cord. Also the price of solid state external hard drives are coming down. I don't own one, but I think they are probably the fastest and the most durable.
 
Joined
Nov 5, 2007
Messages
8,057
Location
Dallas, TX
A 500 gb external hard drive is small. I have a 3 terabyte hard drive and now you can get 5TB hard drives for around a hundred bucks. I copy my pictures and files on a regular basis to a couple external hard drives. So transferring data in one huge lump is never an issue.

Hiring a IT professional if you are not comfortable with the process isn't a bad idea. This way nothing is likely to get lost or deleted. It couldn't cost too much.

Good.luck.with.the.process.does.the.spacebar.work.on.the.new.computer?
 

Pat-inCO

Hawkeye
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
5,922
Location
In the AZ oven (Phoenix basin)
reloader said:
Thumb drives also work great, the newer ones are faster than the older ones.
The class number is your primary indicator of how "fast" the SD card is.
The lower the number the slower. Many (most?) true thumb drives are
class 4 where many of the micro SDs run class 4 to 10.

If yours has a "U" number, U1 is roughly equal to a class 10. U numbers
(so far) are 1 and 3 with 3 being three times as fast a 1.

Pure age has little to do with it, other than the significantly older ones
were in the class 1 to 4 range. :D

The one thing you need to be careful with is the age of your computer.
Many/most of the older (I'll guess at four or more years) do not support
SD capacities above 32G, with a few that do not support above 16G.
Thus a 64 or 128G SD card could easily not work for you. :shock:

Over simplification: If your computer is a 32 bit processor, it probably
will not support SDs above 32G.

T'ain't data transfer/storage fun?! :roll:
 

PriseDeFer

Single-Sixer
Joined
Apr 22, 2014
Messages
432
One.what.at.a.time? File? Folder? Are.you.Windows? Press.ctrl.a.and.copy.a.bunch.to.the.flash.drive.
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2009
Messages
5,432
Location
China Spring TX
We use external hard drives here to back everything up and can then plug into any machine to transfer. They have gotten so cheap that other than mobility(flash drives for that) we use an external drive for most things.
 

Rick Courtright

Hawkeye
Joined
Mar 10, 2002
Messages
7,897
Location
Redlands CA USA
Hi,

All my data is first stored in a dedicated data folder on the originating computer, laptop or desktop. For backup purposes, it's then simply copied and pasted to another dedicated data folder, with matching folder/subfolder hierarchy, on either or both an external hard drive or thumb drive. The ext HD can be gotten to from any machine on the home network. If something in progress just needs to be transferred from one computer to the other, sneaker net and a thumb drive do a nice job. It's a lo-tech suggestion from a magazine writer 20+ years ago when floppies still did most of our external storage, and still works fine today.

I do it that way to avoid the extra fluff on "back up" programs: electronic stuff hates me, so it seems I ALWAYS have one computer which won't talk to the "restore" program when I need something and I'm not fond of being left stuck by some over-caffeinated geek's idea of what sounded like a good idea, but wasn't. KISS!

Rick C
 

Latest posts

Top