Thoughts on Memorial Day

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AZ10X

Bearcat
Joined
Feb 28, 2024
Messages
26
Location
Sun City, AZ
We can never repay both the living and dead for the great gift for which that fought and so many died. Oh, how many of us have taken it so for granted. Many of us have spent most of our lives feeling that freedom was an entitlement instead of a gift. People have served and died to give us this gift. On Memorial Day we hold it in such high importance but how often in the past have we taken it for granted? The knowledge of how precious this gift is has helped me understand that these men did not serve and die in vain and become the forgotten. Only when we live under the delusion that we are somehow entitled to freedom have we broken faith with them. I have realized that freedom is only free to me because it was paid for by the lives of many. The amazing part is that they gave it to us with no expectations of anything in return. A gift that was fought for and won by those that served was given to us with no strings attached. Our only responsibility is that we protect it well so we can pass it down to our children and all future generations. The truth is that we don't have to know and remember the names of all those who served and died but rather we should hold sacred the cause for which they unselfishly served and died.
 
Joined
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Messages
1,463
Location
western Ky
Yes
 

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J. Yuma

Single-Sixer
Joined
Apr 4, 2024
Messages
116
Location
north carolina
We can never repay both the living and dead for the great gift for which that fought and so many died. Oh, how many of us have taken it so for granted. Many of us have spent most of our lives feeling that freedom was an entitlement instead of a gift. People have served and died to give us this gift. On Memorial Day we hold it in such high importance but how often in the past have we taken it for granted? The knowledge of how precious this gift is has helped me understand that these men did not serve and die in vain and become the forgotten. Only when we live under the delusion that we are somehow entitled to freedom have we broken faith with them. I have realized that freedom is only free to me because it was paid for by the lives of many. The amazing part is that they gave it to us with no expectations of anything in return. A gift that was fought for and won by those that served was given to us with no strings attached. Our only responsibility is that we protect it well so we can pass it down to our children and all future generations. The truth is that we don't have to know and remember the names of all those who served and died but rather we should hold sacred the cause for which they unselfishly served and died.
A friend sent this to me this morning.
I'm not a vet, but I'm a grateful citizen.

FOLDING THE FLAG
If you've ever attended a military funeral, perhaps you noticed that the honor guards pay meticulous attention to folding the U.S. flag that once draped the casket. Guards make crisp, precise folds a total of 13 times to complete the ceremony. Much like every other aspect of our nation's greatest symbol, each of the 13 folds holds a special significance.
Flag etiquette dictates that every time an American flag is to be stored or presented during a ceremony, its handlers should fold it in half twice lengthwise; then starting with the end opposite the blue field, make a taut triangular fold. Handlers continue to fold the flag in triangles until the flag has formed a triangular "pillow" with the blue field showing on the outside. It's a dignified way to treat the flag, and gives a powerful touch to patriotic ceremonies.
This 13-fold procedure was common long before the more modern assigned meanings. The source and date of origin of the meanings is unknown, but for those who participate or witness a formal flag folding ceremony, whether it be on Flag Day, Memorial Day, July 4th, Veterans Day, or at a military funeral, the 13 meanings can create an uplifting experience.
This is what the 13 folds mean:
  1. The first fold of our flag is a symbol of life.
  2. The second fold signifies our belief in eternal life.
  3. The third fold is made in honor and tribute of the veteran departing our ranks, and who gave a portion of his or her life for the defense of our country to attain peace.
  4. The fourth fold exemplifies our weaker nature as citizens trusting in God; it is to Him we turn for His divine guidance.
  5. The fifth fold is an acknowledgement to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, "Our country, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right, but it is still our country, right or wrong."
  6. The sixth fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that we pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.
  7. The seventh fold is a tribute to our armed forces, for it is through the armed forces that we protect our country and our flag against all enemies.
  8. The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered into the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day, and to honor our mother, for whom it flies on Mother's Day.
  9. The ninth fold is an honor to womanhood, for it has been through their faith, love, loyalty, and devotion that the character of men and women who have made this country great have been molded.
  10. The 10th fold is a tribute to father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for the defense of our country since he or she was first-born.
  11. The 11th fold, in the eyes of Hebrew citizens, represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon and glorifies, in their eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.
  12. The 12th fold, in the eyes of a Christian citizen, represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in their eyes, God the Father, the Son, and Holy Ghost.
  13. The last fold, when the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost, reminding us of our national motto, "In God We Trust."
 

jgt

Buckeye
Joined
Jul 30, 2008
Messages
1,011
Location
coleman texas
I never thought much about it since most all men in my family served in the military when they were old enough. It was just what everyone we knew did. Afterward, the flag meant much more to me. The country meant much more to me. I never chose to leave it again.
To see the abuse of our constitution and to see foreign flags or other flags flown in place of our stars and stripes not only angers me, it hurts. To see statues torn down or defaced. Names of schools and military installations changed to some commie name also triggers feelings of betrayal. I am able to respond to those, rather than react to them, but they do trigger negative emotions.
Ignorant people that seem to get their news from MSM, who come here and hawk the same twisted accusation against Trump get old. They never look at the truth of those accusations and how eventually they are all proven to be made up, or twisted, or out of context stories by the very people trying to enslave us.
Today I chose to honor our fellow patriots who loved this country enough to answer the call and serve. I am proud to be called a Patriot. No matter how they try to make that into a negative slur, I am proud to be slurred. I love our country and its Constitution. I am proud of our Supreme Court. I am proud of fellow MAGA supporters. AND, I am proud to say God Bless America!!
 

Don Lovel

Hunter
Joined
Nov 10, 2003
Messages
2,580
Location
Red Dirt Oklahoma, Go Cowboys
We can never repay both the living and dead for the great gift for which that fought and so many died. Oh, how many of us have taken it so for granted. Many of us have spent most of our lives feeling that freedom was an entitlement instead of a gift. People have served and died to give us this gift. On Memorial Day we hold it in such high importance but how often in the past have we taken it for granted? The knowledge of how precious this gift is has helped me understand that these men did not serve and die in vain and become the forgotten. Only when we live under the delusion that we are somehow entitled to freedom have we broken faith with them. I have realized that freedom is only free to me because it was paid for by the lives of many. The amazing part is that they gave it to us with no expectations of anything in return. A gift that was fought for and won by those that served was given to us with no strings attached. Our only responsibility is that we protect it well so we can pass it down to our children and all future generations. The truth is that we don't have to know and remember the names of all those who served and died but rather we should hold sacred the cause for which they unselfishly served and died.
My name is the same as the one seen here in Normandy
 

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J. Yuma

Single-Sixer
Joined
Apr 4, 2024
Messages
116
Location
north carolina
My daughter and her family live in DC. Last year my Son-in-law (ex military) took me to Arlington. The Tomb of The Unknown Soldier will get you thinking clearly.
If a person can't feel gratitude after visiting Arlington, they don't belong here.
 

J. Yuma

Single-Sixer
Joined
Apr 4, 2024
Messages
116
Location
north carolina
This sums it up.
Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.
But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate-we can not consecrate-we can not hallow-this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.

It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us-that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion-that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain-that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom-and that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth.
Abraham Lincoln
 

BearBiologist

Hunter
Joined
Dec 4, 2021
Messages
2,639
My daughter and her family live in DC. Last year my Son-in-law (ex military) took me to Arlington. The Tomb of The Unknown Soldier will get you thinking clearly.
If a person can't feel gratitude after visiting Arlington, they don't belong here.
I felt that way at the Sunken Road at Antietam. Our training center was across the river from there and I went several times! Also, at the Custer Monument.
 

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
Messages
7,976
Location
Memphis, TN USA
I am moved by each of the above posts, as I too, wore the uniform. As I told my great grandaughter (yes, my great grandaughter) that "once you put on that uniform, you never really take it off."

If you've got any gumption about you, you'll find that to be true.

Bob Wright
 

RC44Mag

Buckeye
Joined
Jul 18, 2022
Messages
2,077
Location
Long Island
My name is the same as the one seen here in Normandy
🫡
We're flying to Normandy next Monday for the 80'th anniversary of "The Day". This is just one of the places we'll be to send our respects to our boys. Don't think we'll be looking through markers as there's too many and we have a lot of ground to cover but I'll say something for your family member while there.
 

Don Lovel

Hunter
Joined
Nov 10, 2003
Messages
2,580
Location
Red Dirt Oklahoma, Go Cowboys
🫡
We're flying to Normandy next Monday for the 80'th anniversary of "The Day". This is just one of the places we'll be to send our respects to our boys. Don't think we'll be looking through markers as there's too many and we have a lot of ground to cover but I'll say something for your family member while there.
My dad's older brother. Dad was deploying with 9th Armor when he got word of Uncle Don being wounded in southern Belgium in a counter offensive mortar crossfire by the Germans. Uncle Don died in the hospital at Normandy.
 
Joined
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Messages
2,430
Location
Communist Paradise of NY
2nd Lieutenant John Edward Butts was born on August 4th 1922 and died in Normandy on June 23rd 1944 at 21 years of age. He was in the 9th Infantry Division in the 60th Infantry Regiment. Lt. Butts was wounded on June 14th and June 16th. He disregarded his wounds and stayed with his Company. On June 23rd 1944 his Company was being held up by a series of German machine gun nests and pillboxes. Lt Butts ordered his men to flank the installations while he frontally assaulted the position to draw the German fire. He was fatally wounded and got to within 10 yards of the objective before he died. His actions allowed his men to wipe out the German position and keep advancing. For his actions Lt. Butts was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. He was originally buried in France but after the war his remains were returned to his hometown of Medina NY for permanent burial.
 

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