The names we grew up with who LOVED this country

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LDM

Blackhawk
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Also, Robert Stack. Used his experience as a championship skeet shooter to be an aerial gunnery instructor.
 
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There are many more unmentioned such as Ted Williams who was a fighter pilot both in WWII and Korea, and Ed McMahon who was a Marine Fighter Pilot.
The rest of the story


As an officer in the Marine Corps Reserve, McMahon was recalled to active duty during the Korean War. He flew an OE-1 (the original Marine designation for the unarmed single-engine Cessna O-1 Bird Dog) spotter plane, serving as an artillery spotter for Marine artillery batteries and a forward air controller for Navy and Marine fighter bombers. He flew a total of 85 combat missions, earning six Air Medals. After the war, he remained in the Marine Corps Reserve, retiring in 1966 as a Colonel. In 1982, McMahon received a state commission as a brigadier general in the California Air National Guard, an honorary award to recognize his support for the National Guard and Reserves
 
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Not to discount anyone or this discussion, but WWII was a little different than today and todays "conflicts'. Just about every able bodied man joined one branch or another of the military during that time. I ran the numbers some time in the last year as a comparison.... this pandemic we've had, which was bad by just about every one's standard has killed something like 6.5 million people. ..... WWII.....over 73 million.
 
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Heroes still exist just not as famous as some or as well paid.
Flying on and off Carriers isn't the safest job to have in either Helo or fixed wing. Hell just being on the Carrier flight deck while Flight Operations are taking place is damn dangerous day or night. Son saw a friend killed when his jet went over the side and a deck hand blown down the open elevator.

Son and Grandson both received a Nomination to Annapolis. Daughter received an Appointment to USAF Academy

Navy Captain Son swearing in USAFA class of 1996 Sister/Daughter to O-6 Col.

1664229923445.png



When Daughter wore Navy White as a CO.
Both Son and Daughter were COs at the same time Naval History was made and both being Naval Aviators.
Daughter and her Husband were the first married couple to go thru Naval Flight Training and receive their Wings of Gold at the same time.
1664229836753.png
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
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That's quite a list but it makes a bad taste for those who came home to be spit on by the public and called 'baby killers'.
 

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
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If his name was on the list I missed it, but comedian/singer Tennessee Ernie Ford piloted a B-17 in the European Theatre of Operations (ETO) and returned to the US to be an instructor.

Ernie Ford had about one of the best voices of the era with many hit songs of the 'Fifties.

Bob Wright
 

Bob Wright

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As to Ed McMahon, I recall seeing a photo of a flight of four F-4U Corsairs. Two of the planes were identified as being piloted by astronaut John Glen and and Ed McMahon. The caption, as I recall, indicated they were over Korea.

Bob Wright
 
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If his name was on the list I missed it, but comedian/singer Tennessee Ernie Ford piloted a B-17 in the European Theatre of Operations (ETO) and returned to the US to be an instructor.

Ernie Ford had about one of the best voices of the era with many hit songs of the 'Fifties.

Bob Wright
Bob,
I think Ernie dropped 16 Tons of bombs on Japan.
A First Lieutenant, he served in the United States Army Air Corps in World War II as the bombardier on a B-29 Superfortress flying missions over Japan. He was also a bombing instructor at George Air Force Base, in Victorville, California.

John Glen flew F-86s "MIG Mad Marine" as an exchange pilot with the USAF and Ed flew Birddogs in Kroea.
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A few more.

My favorite because his character is one of favorites and the show one of my favorites. Alvy Moore or I always think of him as Hank Himball on Green Acres. US Marines and was in combat at Iwo Jima.

Woodrow Parfey who I thought perfect as the snake oil salesman in The Outlaw Josey Wales. Battle of the Bulge, was wounded, captured by the Germans and became a POW.

Edwin Neal. The hitchhiker in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Bronze star for service during The Vietnam War.
 

Acorn

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I never cared for Charles Durning as an actor. No particular reason.
Until I read that we was a Battle of th Bulge combatant and a Malmady Massacre survivor.
I read that he was tormented by nightmares about it for years afterwards.
It gave me a new respect for the man.
 
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He was not a star only a script writer in 1941 and later became a director... I mentioned him in a different thread a while back... Sam Fuller joined the Army right after Pearl Harbor.... while in boot camp one of the guys he had worked with told him he could get him transferred to the Army's newspaper office and he declined.... he then ended up in North Africa and then up through Sicily and Italy. At some point in Italy another friend from Hollywood offered him a 'desk job' but he declined. Then there was a beach called Omaha on D Day and he headed inland.. Sometime just before the Battle of the Bulge he was offered the same thing again and declined.... walked through the whole war from North Africa to liberating a concentration camp as a private.
 

TomC321

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I never cared for Charles Durning as an actor. No particular reason.
Until I read that he was a Battle of the Bulge combatant and a Malmady Massacre survivor.
I read that he was tormented by nightmares about it for years afterwards.
It gave me a new respect for the man.

If you can believe it, Charles Durning was a Ranger who went in on D-Day. I don't remember if he was at Point du Hoch or Omaha Beach.

Ted Williams was a big name baseball player when he went in the Marines in WW II. He became a Naval Aviator. He was so good at air-to-air gunnery, they made him an instructor. I don't believe he saw combat in WW II.

He got recalled for Korea. They threw him a big going away party at Fenway because they thought he would be too old to play when he got back. He flew in Korea as John Glenn's wingman. After he got out, he played baseball for 3 more years.
 

oliver507

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Some of these will really surprise you.

WHAT A DIFFERENCE SOME GENERATIONS MAKE!

THESE FOLKS ARE FROM “THE GREATEST GENERATION” EMBRACING WWII.



I can only send this to people our age, since today's people don't have any idea who these men were and that's a pity . . .





Sterling Hayden, US Marines and OSS. Smuggled guns into Yugoslavia and parachuted into Croatia.



James Stewart, US Army Air Corps. Bomber pilot who rose to the rank of General.



Ernest Borgnine, US Navy. Gunners Mate 1c, destroyer USS Lamberton.



Ed McMahon, US Marines. Fighter Pilot. (Flew OE-1 Bird Dogs over Korea as well.)



Telly Savalas, US Army.



Walter Matthau, US Army Air Corps., B-24 Radioman/Gunner and cryptographer.



Steve Forrest, US Army. Wounded, Battle of the Bulge.



Jonathan Winters, USMC. Battleship USS Wisconsin and Carrier USS Bon Homme Richard. Anti-aircraft gunner, Battle of Okinawa .



Paul Newman, US Navy Rear seat gunner/radioman, torpedo bombers of USS Bunker Hill



Kirk Douglas, US Navy. Sub-chaser in the Pacific. Wounded in action and medically discharged.



Robert Mitchum, US Army.



Dale Robertson, US Army. Tank Commander in North Africa under Patton. Wounded twice. Battlefield Commission.



Henry Fonda, US Navy. Destroyer USS Satterlee.



John Carroll, US Army Air Corps. Pilot in North Africa. Broke his back in a crash.



Lee Marvin US Marines. Sniper. Wounded in action on Saipan. Buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Sec. 7A next to Greg Boyington and Joe Louis.



Art Carney, US Army. Wounded on Normandy beach, D-Day. Limped for the rest of his life.



Wayne Morris, US Navy fighter pilot, USS Essex. Downed seven Japanese fighters.



Rod Steiger, US Navy. Was aboard one of the ships that launched the Doolittle Raid.



Tony Curtis, US Navy. Sub tender USS Proteus. In Tokyo Bay for the surrender of Japan .



Larry Storch, US Navy. Sub tender USS Proteus with Tony Curtis.



Forrest Tucker, US Army. Enlisted as a private, rose to Lieutenant.



Robert Montgomery, US Navy.



George Kennedy, US Army. Enlisted after Pearl Harbor, stayed in sixteen years.



Mickey Rooney , US Army under Patton. Bronze Star.



Denver Pyle, US Navy. Wounded in the Battle of Guadalcanal. Medically discharged.



Burgess Meredith, US Army Air Corps.



DeForest Kelley, US Army Air Corps.



Robert Stack, US Navy. Gunnery Officer.



Neville Brand, US Army, Europe. Was awarded the Silver Star and Purple Heart.



Tyrone Power, US Marines. Transport pilot in the Pacific Theater.



Charlton Heston, US Army Air Corps. Radio operator and aerial gunner on a B-25, Aleutians .



Danny Aiello, US Army. Lied about his age to enlist at 16. Served three years.



James Arness, US Army. As an infantryman, he was severely wounded at Anzio, Italy.



Efram Zimbalist, Jr., US Army. Purple Heart for a severe wound received at Huertgen Forest.



Mickey Spillane, US Army Air Corps, Fighter Pilot and later Instructor Pilot.



Rod Serling, US Army, 11th Airborne Division in the Pacific. He jumped at Tagaytay in the Philippines and was later wounded in Manila.



Gene Autry, US Army Air Corps. Crewman on transports that ferried supplies over "The Hump" in the China-Burma-India Theater.



William Holden, US Army Air Corps.



Alan Hale Jr, US Coast Guard.



Harry Dean Stanton, US Navy. Battle of Okinawa.



Russell Johnson, US Army Air Corps. B-24 crewman who was awarded Purple Heart when his aircraft was shot down by the Japanese in the Philippines .



William Conrad, US Army Air Corps. Fighter Pilot.



Jack Klugman, US Army.



Frank Sutton, US Army. Took part in 14 assault landings, including Leyte, Luzon, Bataan and Corregidor.



Jackie Coogan, US Army Air Corps. Volunteered for gliders and flew troops and materials into Burma behind enemy lines.



Tom Bosley, US Navy.



Claude Akins, US Army. Signal Corps., Burma and the Philippines.



Chuck Connors, US Army. Tank-warfare instructor.



Harry Carey Jr., US Navy.



Mel Brooks, US Army. Combat Engineer. Saw action in the Battle of the Bulge.



Robert Altman, US Army Air Corps. B-24 Co-Pilot.



Pat Hingle, US Navy. Destroyer USS Marshall



Fred Gwynne, US Navy. Radioman.



Karl Malden, US Army Air Corps. 8th Air Force, NCO.



Earl Holliman. US Navy. Lied about his age to enlist. Discharged after a year when the Navy found out.



Rock Hudson, US Navy. Aircraft mechanic, the Philippines.



Harvey Korman, US Navy.



Aldo Ray, US Navy. UDT frogman, Okinawa.



Don Knotts, US Army, Pacific Theater.



Don Rickles, US Navy aboard USS Cyrene.



Harry Dean Stanton, US Navy. Served aboard an LST in the Battle of Okinawa.



Soupy Sales, US Navy. Served on USS Randall in the South Pacific.



Lee Van Cleef, US Navy. Served aboard a sub chaser then a mine sweeper.



Clifton James, US Army, South Pacific. Was awarded the Silver Star, Bronze Star, and Purple Heart.



Ted Knight, US Army, Combat Engineers.



Jack Warden, US Navy, 1 938-1942 , then US Army, 1 942-1945 . 101st Airborne Division.



Don Adams, US Marines. Wounded on Guadalcanal, then served as a Drill Instructor.



James Gregory, US Navy and US Marines.



Brian Keith, US Marines. Radioman/Gunner in Dauntless dive-bombers.



Fess Parker, US Navy and US Marines. Booted from pilot training for being too tall, joined Marines as a radio operator.



Charles Durning, US Army. Landed at Normandy on D-Day. Shot multiple times. Awarded the Silver Star and Bronze Star and three Purple Hearts. Survived Malmedy Massacre.



Raymond Burr, US Navy. Shot in the stomach on Okinawa and medically discharged.



Hugh O' Brian, US Marines.



Robert Ryan, US Marines.



Eddie Albert, US Coast Guard. Bronze Star with Combat V for saving several Marines under heavy fire as pilot of a landing craft during the invasion of Tarawa.



Cark Gable, US Army Air Corps. B-17 gunner over Europe.



Charles Bronson, US Army Air Corps. B-29 gunner, wounded in action.



Peter Graves, US Army Air Corps.



Buddy Hackett, US Army anti-aircraft gunner.



Victor Mature, US Coast Guard.



Jack Palance, US Army Air Corps. Severely injured bailing out of a burning B-24 bomber.



Robert Preston, US Army Air Corps. Intelligence Officer.



Cesar Romero, US Coast Guard. Coast Guard. Participated in the invasions of Tinian and Saipan on the assault transport USS Cavalier.



Norman Fell, US Army Air Corps., Tail Gunner, Pacific Theater.



Jason Robards, US Navy. was aboard heavy cruiser USS Northampton when it was sunk off Guadalcanal. Also served on the USS Nashville during the invasion of the Philippines, surviving a kamikaze hit that caused 223 casualties.



Steve Reeves, US Army, Philippines.



Dennis Weaver, US Navy. Pilot.



Robert Taylor, US Navy. Instructor Pilot.



Randolph Scott, Tried to enlist in the Marines but was rejected due to injuries sustained in US Army, World War 1.


Ronald Reagan, US Army. Was a 2nd Lt. in the Cavalry Reserves before the war. His poor eyesight kept him from being sent overseas with his unit when war came so he transferred to the Army Air Corps Public Relations Unit where he served for the duration.



John Wayne, Declared "4F medically unfit" due to pre-existing injuries, he nonetheless attempted to volunteer three times (Army, Navy and Film Corps.) so he gets honorable mention.



And of course we have Audie Murphy, America 's most-decorated soldier, who became a Hollywood star as a result of his US Army service that included his being awarded the Medal of Honor.


Would someone please remind me again how many of today's Hollywood elite put their careers on hold to enlist in Iraq or Afghanistan?



The only one who even comes close was Pat Tillman, who turned down a contract offer of $3.6 million over three years from the Arizona Cardinals to enlist in the US Army after September, 11, 2001 and serve as a Ranger in Afghanistan, where he died in 2004. But rather than being lauded for his choice and his decision to put his country before his career, he was mocked and derided by many of his peers.



I submit to you that this is not the America today that it was seventy years ago. And I, for one, am very saddened.



Semper Fi, Dutch
William Hopper/ Paul Drake was US Navy UDT
 
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It was this photograph that I saw published somewhere, made in 1943, showing John Glen in the foreground, and Ed McMahon in the wing position:


Bob Wright
Could be don't know if Ed was in VMO-155 or not.
You would think that the Air and Space could get the Squadron Designation correct.

On January 31, 1945, VMO-155 was redesigned Marine Fighting Squadron 155 (VMF-155). The squadron was deactivated on October 15, 1945, shortly after the cessation of hostilities with Japan.
 

g5m

Single-Sixer
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Messages
144
Just a note on Ed McMahon. When I was in the service and on the east coast the men would speak about running iinto him sometimes in a bar and he always bought the men who were in the service their drinks. The Today show originated in New York at that time which was where McMahon worked.
 

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