The Green Thing

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6GUNSONLY

Hunter
Joined
Nov 30, 2004
Messages
2,755
Location
Alabama, in the bend of the Tennessee River
Ya'll may have already seen this, I hadn't.

Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the much older lady that she should bring her own grocery bags, because plastic bags are not good for the environment,.
The woman apologized to the young girl and explained, "We didn't have this 'green thing' back in my earlier days."
The young clerk responded, "That's our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment for future generations."
The older lady said that she was right our generation didn't have the "green thing" in its day. The older lady went on toexplain: Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were recycled.
But we didn't have the "green thing" back in our day. Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags that we reused for numerous things. Most memorable besides household garbage bags was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our school books. This was to ensure that public property (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribblings. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags.
But, too bad we didn't do the "green thing" back then. We walked up stairs because we didn't have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn't climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks. But she was right. We didn't have the "green thing" in our day.
Back then we washed the baby's diapers because we didn't have the throw away kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts. Wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days.
Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing. But that young lady is right; we didn't have the "green thing" back in our day.
Back then we had one TV, or radio, in the house -- not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana.
In the kitchen we blended and stirred by hand because we didn't have electric machines to do everything for us.
When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap.
Back then, we didn't fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power.
We exercised by working so we didn't need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity. But she's right; we didn't have the "green thing" back then.
We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blade in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull. But we didn't have the "green thing" back then.
Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service in the family's $45,000 SUV or van, which cost what a whole house did before the "green thing."
We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn't need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.
But isn't it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn't have the "green thing" back then?
Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in conservation from a smart a$$ young person. We don't like being old in the first place, so it doesn't take much to set us off... Especially from a tattooed, multiple pierced kid who can't make change without the cash register telling them how much...
 

blackhawknj

Buckeye
Joined
Apr 22, 2010
Messages
1,945
If the TV or the old vacuum tube radio went on the blink, you looked inside, if you saw a bad tube you pulled it, took it to the tube kiosk in the department store or appliance store, tested it, if it was really bad, you bought a new one and plugged it in. If the TV had more serious problems, the repairman made a house call, the lady of the house was there, the head of the house had driven the car to work. If a toaster or other small appliance needed repair, you took it to the repair shop-often the TV and radio shop. Those old appliance were built to last and were designed to be repairable, not like these modern ones that are pressed and stamped together?
I use plastic bags for garbage, haven't bought garbage bags in I forget when.
Hey, we shooters and reloaders wrote the book on recycling. On another board someone asked about reloading primers.
And how about all those country people who used the Sears Roebuck catalog for....
 
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
11,294
Location
Kentucky
6GUNSONLY said:
Back then, we didn't fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power.

Of course most of us didn't have a five-acre "lawn" that we felt needed to be groomed so it looked like a golf course, either, but the thought is valid. :mrgreen:
 
Joined
Nov 17, 2009
Messages
10,297
Location
Webster, MD.
Ale-8(1) said:
6GUNSONLY said:
Back then, we didn't fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power.

Of course most of us didn't have a five-acre "lawn" that we felt needed to be groomed so it looked like a golf course, either, but the thought is valid. :mrgreen:
Our yard was almost grass and the gum balls would stop the reel in a second. Then you had to dig it out. Garbage collection was two piles; stuff that would burn and stuff that would decay.
 

nvbirdman

Blackhawk
Joined
Jun 14, 2002
Messages
734
Location
fallon, nv
I must object to the $45,000 suv costing as much as a house did back in those days. Back when I was growing up, a $45K house would have been two stories on ten acres in the middle of town. I grew up in a two bedroom house that cost my parents $12,000, and it was a good middle income house.
 

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
Messages
6,290
Location
Memphis, TN USA
As to plastic vs. paper sacks at stores, Tennessee is full of forests growing trees for pulpwood that goes into making that paper. These forests provide employment to workers who plant and care for those trees. And lumbermen who harvest those trees. and truck drivers who haul that timber to the mills. And the mills that make the paper.

I'll take paper, please.

Bob Wright
 

173rdLRRP

Single-Sixer
Joined
Mar 17, 2022
Messages
198
Location
Colorado
My immigrant grandmother always carried a cloth shopping bag to the grocery store. We try to remember to do the same. Five years ago we took our 19’ Roadtrek (if a then 77 year old retired couple can spend five months living together in a19’ box, they might well make it) through Canada.

We took a 5 day trip up the northern Labrador coast on the supply ship. It is illegal to use plastic bags in the Maritimes. This was emphasized even further as we did the Labrador Highway of 650 miles of gravel. We RVed to Yucatán each year for 4 months in the beach north of Tulum. Yucatan has the same rules: paper or cloth.

Paper bags always rip out. Like when my Mom and Dad returned from a trip to Juarez 62 years ago and I picked up the paper bag with a one gallon demijon of rum. The demijon ripped through the paper and there was one gallon of Anjeho rum rippling across the driveway. Thought Dad would cry.
 

BearBiologist

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 4, 2021
Messages
464
Conversely, as we "progressed", everybody left the "green" behind: Grandmas buy pampers, wives microwave meals for hubby, have to have bigger houses, two cars, muscle cars. More McDonald's, Burger Kings, KFCs. When was the last time you said "paper" when asked "paper or plastic"? Also, the population (both the US and worldwide) was much smaller.
 

powder smoke

Hawkeye
Joined
Aug 16, 2005
Messages
6,761
Location
Milo Maine
Our yard was almost grass and the gum balls would stop the reel in a second. Then you had to dig it out. Garbage collection was two piles; stuff that would burn and stuff that would decay.
Those are fighting words Heck I maintain 5 acres of lawn, come by I do have a push mower
if you got the hankering to do so, have at it!! I'll be on my zero turn laughing. ps
 

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
Messages
6,290
Location
Memphis, TN USA
Conversely, as we "progressed", everybody left the "green" behind: Grandmas buy pampers, wives microwave meals for hubby, have to have bigger houses, two cars, muscle cars. More McDonald's, Burger Kings, KFCs. When was the last time you said "paper" when asked "paper or plastic"? Also, the population (both the US and worldwide) was much smaller.
I always reply "paper" when asked. The paper sacks serve to line our trash/garbage can. I do own a microwave, but cook on a gas kitchen stove. And of most recent time, we are a one-vehicle family. As to diapers, it has been a long, long time since they were ever needed in our family.

Electric vehicles? No, thanks. We have recently spent time without power, several days to five weeks or more. Our power company's answer to more reliable electricity? You have too many trees!

Bob Wright
 

BearBiologist

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 4, 2021
Messages
464
Moved to eastern Washington and regressed somewhat. Growing many of our own veggies and fruits, canning, composting. Weather requires a couple of 4WD/AWD rigs but we didn't go for real bad guzzlers. Do have electrical outages sometimes, although we have hydro-electric power. Get plastic bags because we use them for dog walks and as trash bags rather than buy new bags. Not real green but better than when we were in SoCal.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2004
Messages
6,236
Conversely, as we "progressed", everybody left the "green" behind: Grandmas buy pampers, wives microwave meals for hubby, have to have bigger houses, two cars, muscle cars. More McDonald's, Burger Kings, KFCs. When was the last time you said "paper" when asked "paper or plastic"? Also, the population (both the US and worldwide) was much smaller.
I can't remember the last time I was asked "paper or plastic". It must have been many years ago.
 

harley08

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 9, 2014
Messages
172
If the TV or the old vacuum tube radio went on the blink, you looked inside, if you saw a bad tube you pulled it, took it to the tube kiosk in the department store or appliance store, tested it, if it was really bad, you bought a new one and plugged it in. If the TV had more serious problems, the repairman made a house call, the lady of the house was there, the head of the house had driven the car to work. If a toaster or other small appliance needed repair, you took it to the repair shop-often the TV and radio shop. Those old appliance were built to last and were designed to be repairable, not like these modern ones that are pressed and stamped together?
I use plastic bags for garbage, haven't bought garbage bags in I forget when.
Hey, we shooters and reloaders wrote the book on recycling. On another board someone asked about reloading primers.
And how about all those country people who used the Sears Roebuck catalog for

I used the Sears Roebuck catalog for stop when shooting 9mm suppressed in the house.
 

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