The cyliders on my GP100 are not all staging the same ?

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TJ11

Single-Sixer
Joined
Feb 7, 2018
Messages
102
Three stage fairly well but two just fire without at feeling at lock up.

Not giant deal but but I'm used to my revolvers locking up then I like a clean second stage let off. This small slip will often cause me to get a flyer or two every string.

I'm at about 325 rounds on this gift .44 Spl. I'm really liking it and just need to know if I have to live with it or can I tune or shim it out ?

Thanks for looking. 8)

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contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
22,139
Location
Lake Lure NC USA
With a different action design than a S&W,, you may find "staging" a bit harder. Jerry Miculek told me once to learn to do a complete pull through when at all possible. Staging could cause issues.

As for "fixing" it to where it will "stage" I'm not qualified to answer how to do that.
 
Joined
Dec 8, 2005
Messages
3,812
Location
Lemont, PA, USA 16851
I agree with Contender, staging can be good or bad depending on the circumstances. When I was shooting PPC competitors wanted a smooth, light straight through pull. On the stages that were longer distances and more time, you could "stage" your gun because you were so intimately familiar with it.

I just pulled out 4 of my GP100s (6", 5", 4", and 3" - .357) that I have lightened the trigger pulls and smoothed up the hammer/trigger and there is no hint of staging, just a real nice straight through pull with no indication of when the hammer was going to fall. That happens to be the way I like it. Others might like something different, I can't say they are wrong.
 

Carry_Up

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 22, 2007
Messages
376
Location
Dallas, TX
The term "staging" has a very specific meaning which should be defined as moving the trigger part way to the release point and holding it there, waiting for the sights to line up to finish the trigger pull. Staging is something performed by the shooter and is not a manufacturing feature. It is thought that this method of shooting will result in greater accuracy and/or faster response times.

I suppose there are pistol coaches that teach this method of shooting, but they are absolutely wrong. Even if the shooter has complete knowledge of how and when his firearm will actually release a shot, the method is entirely unsafe and very poor pistol technique. If in fact the hammer falls at different points during successive DA trigger pulls, the revolver's DA trigger mechanism is crudely made and poorly adjusted. Unfortunately, this is the case for most off the shelf revolvers. It can be improved by a good gunsmith.

Another unpredictable reality of revolver manufacturing is that only the most expensive line-bored cylinders will come close to perfect registration on all chambers. That means the exact timing of cylinder lockup will be slightly different for each chamber on 99.9% of all production revolvers. However, that part of the revolver does not affect the feel of the trigger pull. The requirement is that the cylinder locks up (carries up) before the hammer falls. That is a test that should be performed during checkout, especially on a used revolver.

The smoothest DA pull is found on the Colt revolvers, but a bit of hunting and extra smithing will probably be needed if you find a used model in reasonable condition. Ruger and Smith share the same trigger design. The only difference will be the quality of the finish on the parts, and correct adjustment.

Carry_Up
 

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