the current job market

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Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
6,889
It really must be hard to find GOOD help. Last week a local veterinarian offered me a part time job watching his office, answering the phone, and doing a little bit of vet tech sort of stuff. Yesterday evening I was offered a seasonal tractor seat job doing row crop, baling hay, chopping silage, and as much cow checking and/or dozer/excavator work as I wanted(the last two were optional).
I had to pass on both as my new (second) part time job starts tomorrow. It too came from an out-of-the-blue phone call from the local agency director. I haven't been actively looking for a job for 3-4 years--these people are reaching out to me.
Geez, I wish I'd known my "skill set" was in such demand 5 or 6 years ago when we were struggling financially and trying to adapt to my retirement. I took several jobs that were far too physical during that period just to make ends meet and now I'm wishing I hadn't.
Some of the business men and farmers around here are realizing that older folks may be more trustworthy and dependable than younger guys who show up hungover and break stuff(or simply don't show up). I may not be able to run the long hours a young(er) guy can but then again, I may not spend as much time in the shop fixing stuff, either.
 

gunzo

Buckeye
Joined
Sep 8, 2010
Messages
1,549
You could right about employers looking at the trustworthiness of an older worker. I've been told that, my last job was working in a motorcycle repair shop. The owner said he wanted somebody with experience, but mainly to show up & stay all day.
On the other hand, I believe some think that since you are retired that you just want something to do & they can get you for cheap. I've had that tried on me more than once, offering 4 or $5 an hour or saying come and help me today & I'll buy your lunch. I'll help a friend if he needs it, but I retired to let my mind & body rest, & to smell the roses more often, not to go back to work for chicken feed.
 

Fox Mike

Hawkeye
Joined
Nov 17, 2009
Messages
9,981
I know what you mean. I had been retired about six months when I received a call from a former boss asking if I would be interested in doing some "contract work". I asked where and for how long. He said it was a the same hangar I had previously worked at, working on the same military helicopters I had been associated with but I would be working for Lear-Seigler. I asked about the $$ and it was VERY good. It was supposed to be a six week contract, that turned into a bit over six MONTHS. Surprising was the fact that I was worth so much more as a civilian employee rather than a government employee, doing the exact same job.
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
21,005
Skilled workers in any job market will get good offers. But as noted,,, a work ethic,,, (often associated with older people,) is also a plus.
An employer wants a solid worker, who is dependable & honest. Someone who actually works,,, and is there on time, every day, all day.

Nowadays,,, too many "entitlement" types who THINK they deserve a high paycheck, WITHOUT actually earning it,,, is more the norm. Look at all the unskilled types who demand a huge increase in the minimum wage. They want high pay for low skill jobs. Many fail to understand basic economics,,, that when you are an employer,,, having to pay XYZ in wages,,, your expenses go up. As such, the product you sell will increase in cost, and the end buyer pays more. Double the minimum wage, and you will see the cost of fast food burger joints prices sharply increase, along with ALL other services many use,,, due to the increased cost to the employer.
But,, a person who works,,, is proud of his/her work, shows they are willing to work hard for the company, (loyalty,) will see themselves as a desirable employee. And when others see that in a person,,, they seek them out & try & hire them for their own company,,, often with better pay & benefits.
Older folks are often more stable,,, especially when they are trying to raise a family, build a home etc. They APPRECIATE a good job & are willing to work & earn a wage. Add in their years of experience,, and they become valuable.

Sadly,,, too many laborer types are unreliable, heavy drinkers or smokers, living from one paycheck to another,,, failing to give an honest days labor & then complain about their low wages. We used to have a convenience store,,, selling a lot of beer, wine & cigarettes. I saw this laborer type daily,,, spending a lot of their money on booze & cigs,,, when they could have saved a lot by altering their lifestyle. And they would always complain about being broke,, or wishing they could afford XYZ items.

Lifestyle choices,,, ethics,,, experience,,, all play a big part in what an employer wants.
 
Joined
Oct 24, 2007
Messages
11,164
I officially retired at age 55 to get out of the political BS that made my otherwise great job a daily headache. Not really wanting to sit around, I had joined up with a contract house before submitting my resignation. When my resignation was submitted, I gave my employer a few weeks so I could complete a couple of projects that nobody else would have been able to finish quickly. The contract house was OK with that and told me they'd have work for me as soon as I was ready.

When the projects were complete, I let the contract house know I'd be ready for work. They said OK, we have something in the works for you. How would you feel about staying at your present job as a contractor at a considerable pay increase? Wow! After some consideration and discussion with the contract house and my soon-to-be-ex-employer, I agreed.

On a Friday afternoon, I turned off my computer and left everything just as I was working on it. The following Monday, I returned, fired up my computer, and went back to work. I was asked what was the difference, and I just said I'm making big bucks and I don't have to go to the meetings anymore. The company even included me in the training for the next level of CAD they were implementing.

This continued until the company hit a hard spell, and they "early retired" several senior employees and unloaded all the contractors, including me . . . as in, turn off your computer RIGHT NOW, clean out your personal stuff and leave IMMEDIATELY. By that time retirement suited me just fine, and I'd had a few years of challenging-but-low-pressure, high-reward employment as a finale to my "career".

:mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
 

wwb

Hunter
Joined
Nov 18, 2004
Messages
2,786
contender said:
.........Nowadays,,, too many "entitlement" types who THINK they deserve a high paycheck, WITHOUT actually earning it,,, is more the norm. Look at all the unskilled types who demand a huge increase in the minimum wage. They want high pay for low skill jobs. ............

Yup. It's been 9 years since I retired, but things were already that way. Interviewing applicants for jobs as assemblers and general shop help for a small design and manufacturing company, young people (20 years old + or -) with absolutely no skills wanted a job that paid $15 per hour to start. They had no math ability - even simple addition and subtraction, and had zero knowledge of common tools such as a torque wrench or micrometer.

I explained to them that the company is not a charity; it's in business to make money, and we will pay them if they can help us do that. The more they can help, the better they will be paid. My advice to them was to get a GED if they hadn't finished high school, and then go to the local technical college for some training in a skill for which there was some demand.
 

Bull Barrel

Hunter
Joined
Feb 22, 2008
Messages
3,279
A friend cant hire anyone at his business. Everyone wants 15-25 bucks an hour to start and health insurance and 401k. All for an entry level position.
So at age 60 after being in business 30 years he goes to work long before sunrise and stays long after sunset.
 

Don Lovel

Hunter
Joined
Nov 10, 2003
Messages
2,253
one of my neighborhood ranchers talked to me last week about helping him get his hay equipment serviced. He has a bunch of young guys working full time for him. But he told me, "I think you can make a run to NAPA in Monte Vista without having to go to the tavern or romance Lupita before you get back to the shop and bring back the right parts and fluids"
I told him, I can wrench on stuff, put on new hydraulic lines, change filters, grease everything, aint getting in a hurry but will stay busy every day you need me for $100/day cash. He said, "that is actually a bargain compared to what I shell out on these boys every week"
 

Captain America

Buckeye
Joined
Dec 17, 2015
Messages
1,954
I would complain about the work ethic of the entry level candidates I interview but unfortunately most of them have no work ethic at all. I'm 49 years old, I think most here are like me in general, I had chores to do around the house, I helped elderly neighbors, and I got my first job when I was 13. I showed up on time and did everything that needed to be done, I listened, learned, and made myself valuable to the company I started at when I was 17 and have worked myself up to a respectable position. Sweep floors, clean toilets, stock shelves, anything they asked me to do in any department I was willing to do and I think most here were probably that way also. Unfortunately the vast majority(not all) of the youngsters I interview have absolutely no clue what an entry level position is. It's getting your foot in the door, showing me that you're trustworthy, reliable, hard working, etc, after a little while a judgment can then be made about your future but, as stated before, most of this current generation want top dollar, vacations, and a 401K right off the bat, and in addition to that they want to be able to use their cellphone at any time during the hours that they're supposed to be working.
 

bogus bill

Hunter
Joined
Dec 25, 2009
Messages
3,969
Retired in 2000. Haven't worked a lick since and no one wants me. Hey hittman, maybe that guy is bleached bones in his shack?
 

AJGUNNER

Hunter
Joined
Jan 15, 2007
Messages
2,130
A bit of a story on my son in the employment world. He had several part time jobs during high school and summers. Out of high school he stepped up to 12 hour graveyard shift for around $11 and hour at a manufacturing company. His goal is to get a degree in 4 years and remain debt free. 1 year of college down and he landed an ag job paying $13 an hour with tons of OT. Only one ugly catch----ag work does not pay OT. Plus it was physically hard work---which he loves, because even when putting in 15+ hour days he also continued hitting the gym for 2 hours every single day. He learned real quick that there are better opportunities out there. He landed a great manufacturing position over the Holiday break that also got him 50 hours of work during spring break---providing $$$'s he desperately needed to finish out spring term. He is going back here the day he gets done with finals. The pay is unbelievable for a kid his age (20), but he has an impressive resume for a kid. I believe employers really do pay attention when they see something they like in a young guy. He is punctual, clean in appearance, and willing to learn and do anything asked of him. I talked with his boss (plant manager) briefly during spring break and he told me he got his start at this company while working his way through college----29 years ago. Guess you never know when an opportunity could turn into a career. Without mentioning the company name, it is international and know by everyone. My son has already talked about the possibility of making this a career company.
 

Pat-inCO

Hawkeye
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
5,729
Mobuck said:
Geez, I wish I'd known my "skill set" was in such demand 5 or 6
years ago when we were struggling financially and trying to adapt
to my retirement.
Don't forget o-bam-bam was in office then.
THAT'S why they were not looking for workers . . . then.
 

gunzo

Buckeye
Joined
Sep 8, 2010
Messages
1,549
contender said:
Sadly,,, too many laborer types are unreliable, heavy drinkers or smokers, living from one paycheck to another,,, failing to give an honest days labor & then complain about their low wages. We used to have a convenience store,,, selling a lot of beer, wine & cigarettes. I saw this laborer type daily,,, spending a lot of their money on booze & cigs,,, when they could have saved a lot by altering their lifestyle. And they would always complain about being broke,, or wishing they could afford XYZ items.

Lifestyle choices,,, ethics,,, experience,,, all play a big part in what an employer wants.

Judge your customers much? The people that put money in yours or your families pocket?
The "laborer type" ?
Sounds like the attitude that the left has of the American worker.

When a person has spent 10-12 hours a day, six days a week on the manufacturing floor, then we'll talk. On the other hand, we'll not need to talk, you'll understand. Some of the best workers that industry has ever seen couldn't run their personal life to literally save their life. Lifestyle, to a point has little to do with it. Ethics, experience, & attendance are all that should matter. Not that they buy a 12 pack after work.
 

Colonialgirl

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 7, 2008
Messages
7,580
gunzo said:
contender said:
Sadly,,, too many laborer types are unreliable, heavy drinkers or smokers, living from one paycheck to another,,, failing to give an honest days labor & then complain about their low wages. We used to have a convenience store,,, selling a lot of beer, wine & cigarettes. I saw this laborer type daily,,, spending a lot of their money on booze & cigs,,, when they could have saved a lot by altering their lifestyle. And they would always complain about being broke,, or wishing they could afford XYZ items.

Lifestyle choices,,, ethics,,, experience,,, all play a big part in what an employer wants.

Judge your customers much? The people that put money in yours or your families pocket?
The "laborer type" ?
Sounds like the attitude that the left has of the American worker.

When a person has spent 10-12 hours a day, six days a week on the manufacturing floor, then we'll talk. On the other hand, we'll not need to talk, you'll understand. Some of the best workers that industry has ever seen couldn't run their personal life to literally save their life. Lifestyle, to a point has little to do with it. Ethics, experience, & attendance are all that should matter. Not that they buy a 12 pack after work.

When they complain about NOT making enough money and then SPEND what they do make on BOOZE and Cigarettes, I think and KNOW that TY has high hit the nail square and the head and I also know Ty has a load of business experience.
 

Enigma

Hunter
Joined
Apr 17, 2002
Messages
2,027
I have only two points to add to the discussion.

1. What used to be minimum wage jobs in fast food that now make $15 an hour either already have been, or will be, automated. The last fast food joint I ate at before I left the States was in San Diego. I don't even recall what brand it was, but you ordered your meal on a computer. There was one human at the counter for the technologically challenged customer, but I do believe this is the trend.

2. IMHO, a whole lot of young people would earn a whole lot of 'employability' by spending 3 years in the military. They could develop punctuality, dependability, get experience doing the crap jobs, etc., and in addition they would have a 401K and GI Bill benefits afterward.
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
21,005
gunzo,,, I think you mis-understood my post. CG explained it quite well. I probably didn't transfer my thoughts as well as I should have.
I saw a lot of people who failed to provide even a descent living,,, yet, always HAD to have their beer & cigs,,, even when it took food away from their kids. These were the types I was trying to explain. Once,,, a woman slapped a kid who wanted a pack of peanut butter crackers,,, saying he was hungry. The woman was buying beer & cigs,, yet wasn't going to buy her kid a pack of crackers. My Mom almost slapped her,,,, saying that if she could afford beer & cigs,, she could D*** well afford to feed her kid. We later learned she was arrested for drugs,,, and social services found that 2 kids she had were malnourished. THAT"S the kind of low skilled type,, that wants stuff,,, yet fail to do what it takes to make a better life.

And before you judge me,,, when I was married to my 1st wife,,, I worked in a manufacturing plant,, 12 hour shifts for 5 days,, then a 7 hour shift on Saturdays with a starting pay as a "part timer" for $3.50 an hour in 1982. I did this for 3-1/2 months straight,, never missing a day,, and got my first employee evaluation. I was "promoted" to full time,,, and given a .50 cent per hour raise, and insurance. There were a LOT of people that had been there for a lot longer than me,, who were still "part time" (The company got to use them,,, yet they didn't have to give them benefits due their status as part time.) My job was to use a diamond grease & finish lap ceramic parts for industry. Dirty, hot, and hard work. At almost 10 months straight in that place,,, after working on a few different projects,, they wanted someone to work on a very hard part to make,,, on 3rd shift,,, unsupervised. They wanted me, because, in their words; " You have ambition & an ability to work w/o us looking over your shoulder." It came with a $1.15 per hour raise. After 2 months of that,, unable to spend time with my family I ASKED to be returned to 1st shift,,, to allow me a little time with my infant son. The Japanese VP had nothing but praise for me when he asked me to take that position, and he tried again to blow smoke up my keester to get me to stay there. When I pointed out how important my family was to me,, he got defensive,,, and upset. I wasn't allowed to move,, so,,, I chose to look for another job.
So, yes,, I've "been there,,, and done that."
I went into construction after that,, while I went to school,, using my GI Bill. Work & a job at the same time.

Now,, I own my own small business, and can NOT get "good" help. I do have a helper,, who is my age,, yet can't climb ladders or get on roofs etc. BUT he is skilled,, and is a huge help. He has a work ethic,, and while he does squander his money somewhat,, he is dependable,, and willing to WORK. I'd love to find a younger man to train & work for me. I've hired 6 potential guys over the last 3 years,, who I HOPED would be "that guy." Since working for me,,, 3 of them,, that I'm aware of,, are now criminals, with a record. One is now a felon.
I'd hire any person who is willing to do the things I do,, and who has a good work ethic,,, train them,,, then in a dozen or so years,,, when I choose to retire,,, I'd sell him an established business cheap,, if he had proved himself. Heck,, if they were good,,, in about 6-7 years,, I'd start the transition.
 

Robb Barnes

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Joined
Sep 16, 2007
Messages
3,775
I get the opportunity to guest teach each spring in the Economics classes at the local high school and the topic is small business and how to succeed in it. While I always share the economic importance of small businesses in our country I explain to the students that unless they are a child prodigy, most likely whey will work in or someday own a small business and I hold up a small paper bag and tell them that in this bag I have 5 things that if they pay attention, will almost guarantee them success in the small business world. I also tell them that I know they work because they worked for me and many other small business owners I have taught over the years.

The first thing I pull out is a razor. The lesson is "clean ourselves up!" Some of those kids have shirts on with sayings that I wouldn't repeat as an adult or want my mom to hear. If they want to really succeed they need to look like they mean business and are ready to work and act like a professional.

Next I pull out an ink pen. The lesson is " take every writing class, speech class and even an acting class they can learn to clearly express themselves and communicate." I tell them they may be the next Stephen Hawkins or Bill Gates but if they can not make their thoughts and ideas known and understood, they are no better than a donkey braying in a field.

The third item I pull out is a watch. The lesson is "be early and at worse be on time." I explain our our country loses over $4,000,000,000 in lost productivity every year by by customers waiting on service providers.

Next I take out a piece of candy and the lesson is " be pleasant for heavens sake!" I explain how Bruce Nordstrom of the Nordstom family shares that his hiring philosophy is pretty simple - "Hire the smile and train the skill".

Finally I take out a small rubber ball and roll it across the classroom floor. This last item represents initiative. If they see a job that needs doing, do it. If they see something that would help the customer, see if it is okay to do it. If they see ways to improve a process, share it.

It is always fun to see how by the end of class some of the students sit up straighter in their chairs, raise their hands to ask questions and want to stay after class to talk.
 
Joined
Nov 20, 2007
Messages
5,075
In September 1960, at the age of 11, I got my first job as a paper boy. I had 65 customers on a 9 mile route in the country that paid $18.50 a month.
My last job was as a test cell operator/turbine engine mechanic which paid about $75k a year at the time I retired in January 2014.

That was 54 straight years of employment. I don't care if the economy is good or bad. If you want to work there is a job out there for you. If need be you work a couple of jobs to make ends meet. Too many people want a hand out and won't take a hand up to get their employment life going. This is the future of our work force. God help us....
 

Pat-inCO

Hawkeye
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
5,729
I think the all time classic was when I went back to work for my previous
employer (I was just retired) as a contractor. There were about ten of us
starting that Monday and one of the questions, from a gal with a heavy
Southern accent, was when she would get an increase.

She got very upset when I said AFTER you begin to work. :roll:
(the contract manager smiled at that) 8)
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
6,889
" from a gal with a heavy
Southern accent, was when she would get an increase.

She got very upset when I said AFTER you begin to work"

Some folks just don't get the idea that a job isn't like a Christmas present, it's an ongoing expectation that you're going to make your employer more money than he's paying you.

The part time job I've been on for 6 years now has regular pay increases but is still a "conservative" paying job. The plus is that I get paid travel time and mileage so I'm "on the clock" from the time I leave the house(or even before if I'm prepping, checking maps, locations, and such). No set hours-just a deadline to finish the tasks. This makes the "conservative" pay scale much more attractive.
The job I start today has similar "paid time and mileage" but the rate is 60% higher. It won't replace the first job because it's too seasonal but it fills a gap w/o compromising either.
 
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