THANK U J.M.

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gunsbam69

Hunter
Joined
May 2, 2012
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3,133


If I'd of known how much I'd like one of these in .500 Linebaugh I'd of got one a long time ago. What was made for Oklahoma has returned to Oklahoma. Big shout out to my man J :!: I O U :D





With some old white grips someone on here gave me. They're thicker up top and bigger all the way around. They're filling in until the horn is good and dry :D
 

contender

Ruger Guru
Joined
Sep 18, 2002
Messages
21,013
I recently shot one similar to this. Thanks Kraig for the for the fun! This one here looks nice!
 

tinman

Buckeye
Joined
Jul 19, 2015
Messages
1,811
Don't have much use for the caliber......but that is one purdy gun.
 

Don Lovel

Hunter
Joined
Nov 10, 2003
Messages
2,253
Be still my beatin heart, that is a beautiful piece of work and my doctor says it will deliver 100% of the adult recommended minimum daily dosage of recoil therapy.
 

Jeepnik

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 16, 2005
Messages
5,224
Man, that is one good looking gun. Nothing gaudy. Good simple lines where function determines form. The type of thing that is appreciated by those who understand and love a good "machine".
 

TULLYMARS

Single-Sixer
Joined
Mar 11, 2010
Messages
178
John makes some of his guns for clients with all the bells and whistles but to me that there is just simple perfection, and plumb sexy to boot.
 

tinman

Buckeye
Joined
Jul 19, 2015
Messages
1,811
Being unfamiliar with the breed, can you tell me where this gun came from? I don't know "J.M.".
 

gunsbam69

Hunter
Joined
May 2, 2012
Messages
3,133
tinman said:
Being unfamiliar with the breed, can you tell me where this gun came from? I don't know "J.M.".

This gun was built by a friend of mine named John Linebaugh who owns Linebaugh Custom Sixguns of Cody, WY.

http://www.customsixguns.com/

He's most famous for developing the .500 and .475 Linebaugh cartridges, but what he's really owed the greatest thanks for, at least in my opinion, is making the .45 Colt what it is today. He's the one that wanted to see it stand alone and show it's true potential, and redesigned the chambers in his own cylinders to make it happen. Dick Casull lengthened and strengthened and called it the .454, but John left it like it was and just built the gun right. (Not that Dick didn't build the gun right, he designed the Freedom Arms revolvers, which have no peer in quality, even according to the great custom revolver builders.) Today's modern .45 Colt chamberings from the major revolver builders mimic, or closely follow John's chamber dimensions. The heavy loadings I use in John's modern .45 Colt chambering surpass most current production .454 loadings. He sent Ross Seyfried off to Africa with the #5 build in .45 Colt on an Abilene, (many call it the "Buffalo Seville", but John has told me it was not a Seville, but an Abilene it was based on) where he took Cape Buffalo with it, and by the time Ross returned, John already had a .50 caliber revolver on the brain. He and Ross developed the new animal together from John's knowledge of cartridges and ballistics, as well as Ross's ideas. The article on the Africa hunt with the .45 Colt hit the pages of Guns & Ammo for the April 1986 issue, and by the August issue of the same year, Seyfried's intention being to use it as a lion stopper, the first ".500 MAGNUM" on one of the Ruger Bisleys was on the front cover of G&A as well. They built one or two on an Abilene or Seville, but the grip frame wasn't sufficient for the recoil, and Ross suggested they try one of the new Bisleys from Ruger. The rest is history. The .500 Linebaugh name was suggested by friends later, and finally stuck. His goal was to build a "True .50" on a practical and packable revolver platform that was a manageable useable caliber. It remains today the most popular of all the revolver based .50s, as it's lower pressure and generally a more pleasant round recoil wise than others that've come along later in similar power ranges. The .475 came along a couple years later when the .348 Winchester brass he was forming the .500 Linebaugh brass from started disappearing when Winchester discontinued the rifle it made chambered in .348, and subsequently the brass for it. He cut down and formed the .475 from Winchester 45-70 brass and was back in business. Shortly thereafter the .348 brass reappeared and up and coming vendors began producing factory headstamped brass in both .500 and .475 Linebaugh, then later even factory loaded ammo. John actually built this .500 Linebaugh Vaquero for a guy in Oklahoma in 2008. J.M. is the initials of the man I bought it from who'll remain anonymous unless he chooses not to, but he was at least the 3rd owner in at least the 3rd state it resided in after leaving the Clark, WY area after originally being built, and it now resides in Oklahoma again with me, where it will stay, unless I should go, to whence it would then go as well :D
 

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