Stallion killed by mare's kick

Help Support Ruger Forum:

JackAsinus

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 26, 2022
Messages
125
At least he died doing what he liked.
Nope, he died in anticipation of doing what he liked.

Similar to hunting and using a mating call, this dude just got closer before the boom was lowered.
 

jimbo1096

Buckeye
Joined
Jan 10, 2005
Messages
1,829
in the head with both feet. Talk about being the wrong place at the wrong time. I also think the handlers made the situation worse with the way they handled it.
 

Biggfoot44

Blackhawk
Joined
Sep 6, 2009
Messages
675
But did they get a refund of the stud fee ?

But seriously , this is one of the reasons for increasing use of Artificial Insemination .
 

badguybuster

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
336
Live cover is always risky but its usually the mare who gets hurt. Ive seen mares get savaged by a stallion and die from sepsis shortly after. This is why virtually all high end horse breeders use envitro
 

wolfsong

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Dec 20, 2005
Messages
2,355
I'd hate to have to be the one who has to tell El Jefe that his prize stallion is dead, and that he didn't even plant the seed for a progeny before dying...
 

badguybuster

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
336
I worked in a lot of breeding stables as a kid, those idiots were completely responsible for that. At a minimum the mare should have been hobbled
 
Joined
Oct 26, 2006
Messages
9,321
I have bred my mares to other peoples studs. As mentioned the mares if were not totally in heat were hobbled. I noticed a baby squeaking and running around. It should have been put up out of sight. I have seen studs get kicked in the chest and shoulder, but these were very experienced studs. Usually the mares were cross tied and hobbled. A shame what happened, surely a teachable moment.
gramps
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
6,879
When I was in my 20's, I helped the local horse trainer/stud owner as he was much too old to be handling this sort of work. At the time I was literally afraid of NOTHING but between the 'excited' studs and the often only marginally receptive mares, that was every bit as dangerous as the flying bullets had been a few short years prior. I hobbled a lot of mares to prevent injuries to the studs (and handlers) and with some amount of luck came out unscathed in the process.
One of the studs was a 'biter' and took a palm sized chunk out of the owner putting him out of action for several weeks. When he was able to walk back to the barn, he noted that stud was a wee bit touchy about being haltered but no longer showed any inclination to bite. The old man didn't say a word to me about my correction technique or even a comment as to what might have changed the stud's attitude. Guess losing a 3" diameter chunk of skin and muscle from his upper arm made him a bit more tolerant of my sometimes brutal actions.
 
Top