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Bear Paw Jack

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Dec 19, 2001
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Just something to think about. I thought this was good…

For a small amount of perspective at this moment, imagine you were born in 1900. When you are 14, World War I starts, and ends on your 18th birthday with 22 million people killed. Later in the year, a Spanish Flu epidemic hits the planet and runs until you are 20. Fifty million people die from it in those two years. Yes, 50 million.

When you're 29, the Great Depression begins. Unemployment hits 25%, global GDP drops 27%. That runs until you are 33. The country nearly collapses along with the world economy. When you turn 39, World War II starts. You aren’t even over the hill yet.

When you're 41, the United States is fully pulled into WWII. Between your 39th and 45th birthday, 75 million people perish in the war and the Holocaust kills six million. At 52, the Korean War starts and five million perish.

At 64 the Vietnam War begins, and it doesn’t end for many years. Four million people die in that conflict. Approaching your 62nd birthday you have the Cuban Missile Crisis, a tipping point in the Cold War. Life on our planet, as we know it, could well have ended. Great leaders prevented that from happening.

As you turn 75, the Vietnam War finally ends. Think of everyone on the planet born in 1900. How do you survive all of that? A kid in 1985 didn’t think their 85 year old grandparent understood how hard school was. Yet those grandparents (and now great grandparents) survived through everything listed above.

Perspective is an amazing art. Let’s try and keep things in perspective. Let’s be smart, help each other out, and we will get through this. In the history of the world, there has never been a storm that lasted. This too, shall pass.
 

sfhogman

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Nov 18, 2002
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My grandparents were born in1890. He dated her - quite literally - in a surrey with a fringe on top. She lived to see men walk on the moon - and everything in between.
She died at 96...
She and my grandfather worked very hard to keep the family together during the hard times.

Jeff
 

any ruger

Blackhawk
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Feb 18, 2007
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My mom was born in 1910 in New York City lived there till 1942 when she met my dad a sailer on the USS Bennington.
 

bobski

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grandma was born in 1904. granddad 1899. my home was built in 1904.
 

RSIno1

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Sep 17, 2013
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My dad was born in 1917. His mom took him out to the family farm to escape the Spanish Flu. At 12 he dropped out of school to help support his divorced mom and put food on the table during the depression. He was taught to be a machinist by the guys where he was sweeping out the shop. He designed and made tooling at Saginaw Steering Gear for BAR and M1 Carbines during WWII. He and my mom went to Alaska while in the Army to run a machine shop toward the end of the war. He came to SoCal and worked as an aerospace engineer. He finally took the time to graduate from high school in the 1970s. He passed away from Pneumonia while in the hospital with a broken hip at 83.
We think of how tough life has been but looking back to the 1890s we see easily how good we have it. My gg grandparents shortly before my grandmother was born. The house was built in 1863 and stood until the mid 1970s. I can only imagine slogging to the outhouse in the middle of a MI winter.
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Johnnu2

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Jun 26, 2003
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My father was born in Manhattan in 1905, and his brother was born there in 1901. It's sort of interesting, this thing called 'perspective'. Neither one of them ever mentioned the hard times to me. I have no idea why. My uncle lived to be 100+ years old and I never heard a negative word about the world out of him. He was, like my father, just continually enthralled by all the amazing things going on around them both. Pop didn't make it past 64 yrs old and while slowly dying, NEVER complained. I guess we are correct in saying that theirs was an amazing generation. I wish I had talked with them more.

J.
 

Mobuck

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All four of my Grandparents were born pre-1900. None lived past 80 years old. Life was tough back then.
 

Goldstar225

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Dec 11, 2011
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My dad was born in 1908. Had to drop out of school in the 8th grade to work and support his mother and younger brother. Cleared brush by hand at 50 cents an acre. Hopped rides on trains to follow the harvest out west. Worked in the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in the 1930's. WWII started when he was 33. Enlisted in the army and fought in the Pacific theater. Sent most of his pay to his mother who saved it. That enabled them to buy the first home they owned. After the war he was employed at the Pine Bluff arsenal, a job he held until his death at 64 in 1973.
 
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You are right... I asked Seri a couple week ago how many people had died from the Corona Virus and she came up with just under 4.5 million, then I asked her how many folks died in the 2nd world war... she came up with 73 million.

some of you won't like the next comparison I'm going to make... back in September everyone was talking about the 20th anniversary of the attack on the twin towers and the pentagon... and the horror of all the lives lost... which I know was bad.... Here it comes... on March 9th 1945 we, the U.S.A. incinerated 100,000 people... in one night. We firebombed Tokyo the center of the city. In fact the first way of bombers actually intentionally made a big burning X for the rest to aim for. I wonder how the survivors of that one felt 20 years later?
 
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blume357 said:
You are right... I asked Seri a couple week ago how many people had died from the Corona Virus and she came up with just under 4.5 million, then I asked her how many folks died in the 2nd world war... she came up with 73 million.

some of you won't like the next comparison I'm going to make... back in September everyone was talking about the 20th anniversary of the attack on the twin towers and the pentagon... and the horror of all the lives lost... which I know was bad.... Here it comes... on March 9th 1945 we, the U.S.A. incinerated 100,000 people... in one night. We firebombed Tokyo the center of the city. In fact the first way of bombers actually intentionally made a big burning X for the rest to aim for. I wonder how the survivors of that one felt 20 years later?

Probably very much like the survivors of the Japanese unprovoked sneak attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, particularly considering that we weren't at war with Japan at the time.
 

Bob Wright

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Jun 24, 2004
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5,988
blume357 said:
You are right... I asked Seri a couple week ago how many people had died from the Corona Virus and she came up with just under 4.5 million, then I asked her how many folks died in the 2nd world war... she came up with 73 million.

some of you won't like the next comparison I'm going to make... back in September everyone was talking about the 20th anniversary of the attack on the twin towers and the pentagon... and the horror of all the lives lost... which I know was bad.... Here it comes... on March 9th 1945 we, the U.S.A. incinerated 100,000 people... in one night. We firebombed Tokyo the center of the city. In fact the first way of bombers actually intentionally made a big burning X for the rest to aim for. I wonder how the survivors of that one felt 20 years later?

Would never have happened if the Japanese had not bombed Pearl Harbor.

If you really want to be horrified, consider the desecration of Marine bodies on some of the islands of the Pacific. And some of the mutilation was done before the Marine's death.

Bob Wright
 

blackhawknj

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If you were born in 1900, you would have been too young for WWI, too old for WWII, depending on you family's circumstances, you might not have been that bad affected by the Great Depression, WWII brought a lot of prosperity, and a lot more men were in draft-exempt occupations than is generally realized. If you retired at age 65 in 1965, you would have Social Security, Medicare, a good pension perhaps.
 

Bob Wright

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blackhawknj said:
If you were born in 1900, you would have been too young for WWI, too old for WWII, depending on you family's circumstances, you might not have been that bad affected by the Great Depression, WWII brought a lot of prosperity, and a lot more men were in draft-exempt occupations than is generally realized. If you retired at age 65 in 1965, you would have Social Security, Medicare, a good pension perhaps.

You seem to overlook the fact that even though one may not have served in either war nor been poverty stricken during the Depression, they were affected by those events none the less. Watching your son, or a relative's son, or your neighbor's son go off to war has an effect on any caring person. Even more so if that family gets the news of the death or wounding of their family member.

My Dad was employed during the Depression, but even so, having the money didn't always equate to having food, or fuel. And things we don't think about now. My mother sat and watched a young woman die of tetanus, contracted, as they believed then, from getting the morning dew in an injured toe. She also sat at bedside as a child died from rabies. And she was to fix the hair and help prepare bodies of those recently died.

My Dad had to identify the body of a train engineer who had died in a train wreck, badly scalded by steam.

In those days, people ached for their neighbors when misfortune befell them. My aunt, my mother's sister, had eleven children. She was to bury over one half of them and her husband before she died.

I remember the polio outbreak of the 'Forties and 'Fifties. One of my friends lost his sister to polio at age six or so. Another had deformed arms from the disease.

So all of those events did affect everybody.

My Dad was born in 1891,died in 1975; my Mom was born in 1896, and died in 1998.

Bob Wright
 

blackhawknj

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My paternal grandmother lived from 1881-1960, outlived 3 of her 5 children. My mother's family largely untouched by the wars of the United States, few served, wrong age cohorts, 4-F, etc. One woman told me she had a brother KIA in Vietnam-she emphasized they didn't "lose" him. Troublemaker, ended up a "judge recommended" enlistee, didn't change his ways. In the 1950s I knew a family that lost a daughter to polio.
The repeal of Prohibition led to a lot of hungry children, their food money spent on a drinking habit.
 

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