Snakes

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NewRuger41

Bearcat
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While I was focused on observing snake circled in red (copperhead), I sneezed and looked down to see the snake circled in yellow beside my right leg.

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Mike J

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Rattlesnake bites aren't a death sentence these days, especially for dogs. There is a vaccine that while it doesn't preclude the need for treatment extends the treatment window and lessens the damage.

I did not know the vaccine existed. All I knew was what my grandfather told me. He said if a dog got bit in front of its heart it would live. If it got bit behind the heart it would die.
 
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View attachment 11235
Saw this guy when I took my son fishing he had the frog in his mouth for a half hour or so. Finally gave up and they both swam away in different directions.
Voracious little critters. And this is a great photo.:cool:

But knowing frogs as I do, I'm still not totally convinced the frog wasn't attempting to eat the snake. :LOL:
 

Mike J

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How many dogs did he lose to snakebite?
The one he told me about lived. He said its head swelled up & it was miserable for days & it's hair fell out where it got bit but it got bit on the face. He said that if it had been bit further back it would have died. He wasn't a vet. Just someone that grew up farming in Oklahoma that was raised by Kentucky Hillbillies. That may not be scientific enough for you but I suspect they knew about such things.
 

wolfsong

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Even rattle snakes can be relocated. I've done it three or four times. I won't kill any snakes.
Oh, I relocate them. Not in the manner you might think, though. I employ a more permanent solution.

I know and appreciate where you're coming from, Cary. I will try to be more tolerant of them, but I can't make any promises.
 
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The one he told me about lived. He said its head swelled up & it was miserable for days & it's hair fell out where it got bit but it got bit on the face. He said that if it had been bit further back it would have died. He wasn't a vet. Just someone that grew up farming in Oklahoma that was raised by Kentucky Hillbillies. That may not be scientific enough for you but I suspect they knew about such things.
Hey relax, I'm mostly funnin' with ya'. That's why I used the smiley.
 
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Oh, I relocate them. Not in the manner you might think, though. I employ a more permanent solution.

I know and appreciate where you're coming from, Cary. I will try to be more tolerant of them, but I can't make any promises.
Hey, I understand. Relocating them can be a risky business. Some people just don't want to take the chance.
 

Jeepnik

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Actually relocating rattlesnakes is pretty easy. Decades ago while stationed in the high desert of California we'd start getting snake calls as soon as it started to warm up. For the most part they were what we called Pacific Diamondbacks. Not terribly aggressive, but you really don't want them in the housing areas with kids about.

Our technique was simple. 5 gallon metal garbage can laid on its side and a broom to herd the snake into the can. Lift it upright from the back and slip on the lid. The snake usually just laid quietly as we drove them into the desert. Once there we just kicked the can over, the lid came off and the snake went on its was.

We also had Mojave Greens. For whatever reason God gave them an especially nasty venom (both hemo and neuro toxin) and a bad attitude to match. The technique was the same with the exception of hitting them with a blast from a CO2 extinguisher. The CO2 disoriented them a bit and made them easier to herd into the can. Once inside you'd hear them striking the side of the can while we transported them further into the desert. Once there we usually sat in the truck and pushed the can over with a pike pole. Once the snake left we'd pick up our can.
 

eveled

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The one he told me about lived. He said its head swelled up & it was miserable for days & it's hair fell out where it got bit but it got bit on the face. He said that if it had been bit further back it would have died. He wasn't a vet. Just someone that grew up farming in Oklahoma that was raised by Kentucky Hillbillies. That may not be scientific enough for you but I suspect they knew about such things.
Its very likely he had heard it elsewhere. So the sample pool might be larger than it seems. Going back decades and being passed down.

Usually those old folk remedies and stories had a grain of truth in them. Even if the science was not obvious.
 
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Its very likely he had heard it elsewhere. So the sample pool might be larger than it seems. Going back decades and being passed down.

Usually those old folk remedies and stories had a grain of truth in them. Even if the science was not obvious.
Yeah, how about the one that says, "if you cut off a snakes head, it won't die until sundown"? Always liked that one.
 

BarkeyVA

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Jan 27, 2016
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Williamsburg, Va
A few years ago while hunting pheasants with a friend near Russell, Kansas, his pointing Lab was bitten in a front leg by a prairie rattler. The dog was treated with antibiotics for infection and after 2 weeks recuperating was back to hunting pheasants.
 

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