Should a new gun be dirty?

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Moparfreak

Bearcat
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Jul 21, 2022
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La Follette, TN
I just bought a Ruger LCRX 327 Federal from a gun shop. It was an under counter display model. Last one they had. Got a fair deal on it. It was dirty... Does the factory test them before shipping? My Keltec P-11 I bought back in the mid 1990's, if I remember it was clean. Here is a pic of some of the cleaning patches. Thoughts?
 

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GunnyGene

Hawkeye
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Nov 23, 2013
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Monroe County, MS
I just bought a Ruger LCRX 327 Federal from a gun shop. It was an under counter display model. Last one they had. Got a fair deal on it. It was dirty... Does the factory test them before shipping? My Keltec P-11 I bought back in the mid 1990's, if I remember it was clean. Here is a pic of some of the cleaning patches. Thoughts?
Many companies fire every gun before it leaves the plant, and some include the fired cartridge(s) in the box. They typically don't clean them for a couple reasons, but one reason is so that the buyer knows the thing passed final QA. It's also to encourage a new buyer to read the manual and learn how to disassemble, clean, and lube it before they go running outside and start throwing lead.
 

KIR

Blackhawk
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Mar 2, 2022
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Earlier this year, I bought a revolver that I really wanted since I missed my previous one that I gave to my son. Even after looking down the barrel with a light, it looked pretty good. When I got it home, I was surprised at how dirty it was when cleaning it. I guess all that junk that had accumulated in the barrel made it look good. Thankfully, after getting it cleaned up, it was still looking good. Makes me want to take a cleaning kit with me the next time I consider buying another firearm.
 

planetcat

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U.S.A.
Same here with new handguns and rifles being dirty out of the box. Test shots are great peace of mind and who doesn't enjoy a nice cleaning session on their new gun? :)
 

contender

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Having actually been to a Ruger plant,, and observing the building process,, all the way to completion,,, INCLUDING the test firing,, followed by the removal of the gun from the test firing machine. I can attest to the fact that they fire usually 1-2 rounds,, then remove the gun, & box it up for shipping.

Normal.
 

Hylander

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Ruger fires a minimum of 3 cylinders full on revolvers and 3 mags on Semi's.
This info came straight from Ruger tech.
 

Uncle Howie

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I bought one of the original SP101 revolvers in .22LR- the style with the sights that are adjustable for windage only. This was after that model had been discontinued.

I found one in a case in a local shop, and asked to look at it. It was filthy! I questioned the proprietor about it, as he was selling it as “NIB.”

He said, “They’re all like that. Wanna see?” He took me into the vault, where he had a bunch of them, all stacked up in their boxes. Every one was filthy!

I just figured they were test firing with Remington Thunderbolts… 🤭
 

langenc

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Aug 22, 2007
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Lewiston, MI USA
Wonder what happens to all that brass?? I boughyt from Midway about 25 yrs ago some 257 Weatherby brass that was from the Weatherby test firing.

It was packaged ion 100's amnd I bought one. Told buiddy about it and he convincd me I might want more. Couple days later it was 'out of stock'.
 

Hylander

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I would question that and believe contender. Especially as he stated he personally observed the test firing.
I wouldn't want a gun that was fired with three cylinders of proof loads.

Just reporting what a Ruger tech told me when I questioned them about this concerning a customers pistol.
 
Joined
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Richmond Texas USA
Wonder what happens to all that brass?? I boughyt from Midway about 25 yrs ago some 257 Weatherby brass that was from the Weatherby test firing.

It was packaged ion 100's amnd I bought one. Told buiddy about it and he convincd me I might want more. Couple days later it was 'out of stock'.
About 10 years ago I bought a few hundred of once fired 45-70s that were used for test fireing at the Marlin Factory. They had red paint on them that indicated that they had been overloads for the test. Anyway that was the story from the seller.
 

contender

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Hylander did not state they test fired the gun with proof loads.

I can not state what they do with revolvers,, but I did watch them fire the LCP,, and most often, it was (2) rounds.
 
Joined
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Reading, Pa
My LCR was slightly gooey when new, my blue MK IV, 10/22, and Mini 14 were very gooey when new, my stainless revolvers were all clean-ish, my Ruger American Pistol Competition Model was absolutely covered in preservative to the point the slide functioned poorly. After a cleaning and some light lubrication they all were smooth as can be.
 

Hylander

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Hylander did not state they test fired the gun with proof loads.

I can not state what they do with revolvers,, but I did watch them fire the LCP,, and most often, it was (2) rounds.

The tech didn't mention proof loads,
Just said test fired for function.
Wondering if the tech over stated the rounds just to make my customer happy.
I have seen a couple videos of some of the processes at Ruger but wish I could take a tour like you did, that would be awesome.
 

contender

Ruger Guru
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As I mentioned,, I didn't get to see how revolvers were test fired,, but I'd doubt it's more than a cylinder full. With the costs of ammo, and the time it takes,, the expense, and trying to meet production schedules,, I doubt it's more than a few rounds each.
UNLESS,, the tech doing the test firing thinks there's a problem. Then they may test a couple more rounds. Any guns not functioning properly will get pulled for additional inspection.
They do not want to spend too much time anywhere that slows production.
And the costs of ammo, when multiplied by the number of guns produced daily,, could add up to a substantial amount QUICKLY!
Think about the year Ruger did the "2 Million Gun Challenge." They built 2 million guns. If they fired just (2) rounds each,, that's 4 million rounds of ammo.
Manufacturers want to keep expenses down, and if they fired a magazine full or a cylinder full,, the expenses just went WAY up.
 

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