Selling and Transferring Guns After Death

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37fed

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jan 16, 2022
Messages
123
Somebody suggested naming a “gun buddy” who knows your collection. And you could agree to be theirs. Give them a list of models and values, combination to the safe, maybe a pick of a few favorite guns for them in return. You know who you can trust.
 

Jeepnik

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 16, 2005
Messages
5,511
Location
On the beach and in the hills
Depends on how your estate is set up. The worst is no estate planing/no will. A will is a bit better but still has hassles. If you have a trust the person handling it transferes just as would the owner. Here state and federal laws come into play. You may eed an FFl in some states not in others. Transfering across state lines would add another complication.

Mine are in my trust, but I've already started to transfer them to my boys. Good kids that they are they let me visit them and sometimes borrow them for a bit. Since the kids live in Nevada and are LEO's there's pretty much nothing to it.
 

Daryl

Bearcat
Joined
Apr 23, 2022
Messages
28
Location
Farmington NM
Have many I'd like to transfer to my son. Need to find an FFL who would charge a reasonable fee for the transfer.
Only dealer around here wants $45 per gun!
 

NikA

Buckeye
Joined
Nov 2, 2014
Messages
1,432
Location
Yrisarri, NM- high in the Manzanos
Have many I'd like to transfer to my son. Need to find an FFL who would charge a reasonable fee for the transfer.
Only dealer around here wants $45 per gun!
In state of NM no FFL is needed for family. Across state lines, no FFL is needed for bequests/settling of an estate, just need to make sure the recipient is eligible to receive.
 

RGRacing

Bearcat
Joined
Aug 25, 2013
Messages
52
Location
Minneapolis, MN
We all need to be thinking about this if we don't have close family with our same interest. I have a document with every penny I have spent on the Guns and Reloading. Hope my wife can use this as a guide. Not much of what I have has gone up to any degree except my Primers.
 

Huskerguy72

Bearcat
Joined
Mar 19, 2017
Messages
63
Location
Central Kansas
I think the answer to some of the questions posted is not as easy as it may seem on the surface. Probably a place to start is with a will or trust. DISCLAIMER: I am NOT an attorney nor do I play one on TV.

A will is fine, you can make directives and your last wishes known through the will. You can also designate specific items (Not money) with a separate document, saying I want Gertrude to have the pink dishes and Mary to have the green ones. Where the will breaks down is upon death, all assets, including firearms are tied up in probate until the attorney the estate hires gets it taken to court (yes they charge for this, sometimes 6% of the total estate), the court can take their time to decide and challenges make it more complicated. I personally did not want my estate to have to hire a crooked attorney (this comment came from my attorney BTW) and I didn't want the courts to take months and even years to settle things. Had a friend whose family passed and it took 2 years, just a very small estate, mainly a house.

My wife and I went with a trust. We have some rental properties and although not much, the Trust allows instant transfer to my wife and then son and daughter. For instance, if my wife and I should perish today, my son and daughter can literally have access to bank accounts, IRA's, sell our home, manage our rentals, or whatever they want instantly. No waiting for the courts. I have a small family, two children and there won't be any fighting over things, but that is not true in all families. I realize there can be variables in every family but mine contains health directives and other such items.

My point is the question about selling firearms once someone has passed may need to be answered with some thing in place beforehand. Obviously if the husband goes first, then the wife still has control, but one can't assume things will always be that set in stone.

I am 68 and in generally good health, have all firearms on a spreadsheet with when, what and how much purchased for and anything added on to them. That's a start. The amount of miscellaneous reloading equipment, accessories, and supplies in my man cave is mind boggling to anyone who doesn't recognize what goes with what. So I have started labeling and putting all parts together so someone can determine what does with what - i.e. what parts goes with my Hornady LNL and what does with my Dillon SDB and so on. Some people who may want to sell some of your items will be more receptive if they walk into a highly organized situation. If they have to spend days cleaning, guessing and organizing, someone has to pay for their time. Make it as easy as possible on everyone.

I have already spoken with a friend who has a pawn shop and FFL about selling my items should I leave this earth. The one piece I can't account for is if he quits his business prior to my departure. I am also considering parting out my collection ahead of time which is probably the best way to go, it is just hard to let go of the beauties' I have collected over the years. I have also considered allowing my two kids to take what they want which I don't anticipate to be much before hand. The advantage of having someone with an FFL doing all of this is they can make certain all the laws in your area are followed. For instance, shipping isn't as easy as it once was and my friend also does a lot of selling on-line which provides additional advantages.
 

Ka6otm

Blackhawk
Joined
Dec 21, 2002
Messages
594
I've sold guns for 2 widows that were friends of mine. In the first case, I was told a LGS would buy entire collections at a fair price, so I went on Gunbroker and a couple of other sites and got prices for everything she had, then gave her an itemized list with prices.

I called the owner of the LGS, he came over and spent a few hours, then wrote down a price for the entire collection.

It was $2,000.00 more than the prices I'd found on the net and she took the price

Not all LGS owners are dishonest and some have feelings for widows. This guy said he did that kind of pricing for widows.

He's now the mayor of the town he lives in and still has his gun store.

In the second case, there were only around a dozen guns and I sold them locally to people I knew and got very good prices for everything after I told the buyers it was for a widow.
 

Ray Newman

Single-Sixer
Joined
Jun 3, 2006
Messages
495
Location
WA ST
Husgerguy is dead nuts on correct about a trust. My father-in-law died first, than a few years later my mother-in-law passed and all the trust assets, except for the sale of the house, were distributed in a matter of days. Same with my sister-in-law's estate. When my mother died her estate was small, but it took well over a year for the probate court to approve her will. As a result, my wife and I created a trust several years ago.

Some have told me that since Washington probate only takes about 6 months, why have a trust? My answer was very easy: why should my estate pay unnecessary attorney fees and why should my wife and or our son needed to wait for the court to approve of our wishes?

As for the "Buddy Plan" to dispose of firearms, I have seen that in some cases the deceased 's take care of themselves and/or friends first. Be very careful doing this as sometimes the temptation to have something that they want or a quick profit becomes overpowering. I have seen this happen not only with firearms, but with woodworking shops....
 

H Richard

Bearcat
Joined
Dec 9, 2007
Messages
41
Location
West Central IL
Somebody suggested naming a “gun buddy” who knows your collection. And you could agree to be theirs. Give them a list of models and values, combination to the safe, maybe a pick of a few favorite guns for them in return. You know who you can trust.
I'm 81, and have been selling and giving away the majority of my guns over the past two years. Every one of my children and grandchildren have received some. The few I have left are mostly my using guns, Trap gun , Skeet gun, Bullseye gun, Carry gun, etc. When I'm gone the will stipulates my rife receives everything and it is up to her to do with as she wishes. She has the mane and phone # of the auction house I have been using to sell many of them.

It's a lot of fun giving away things. The expression on a buddy's face when I handed him a restored bamboo fly rod last week was worth it.
 
Joined
Nov 5, 2007
Messages
7,845
Location
Dallas, TX
I'll add to this necro thread a bit, but maybe it should be its own topic...

I'm going to soon find myself in the position to help a buddy's mother in-law get rid of her departed husband's guns. Neither she, nor my buddy's wife want anything to do with them, and my buddy's keeping them is not an option, either (let's not get started on that subject...).

Anyhow, there are a few in which I'm interested and the others, I plan on seeing if I can sell for the family.

I've got a copy of the Blue Book #43 coming, to help get a baseline not only on those, but for my own collection as well. I also know to look around the sold listings on gunbroker. What are some other sources to find value? No Rugers on the list, but I don't really want to join the S&W forums or others, just to research prices.

The truth is that they're probably so happy to get rid of them that they'd take pennies on the dollar for them, but I want to a) make a fair offering for the ones I want and b) get a fair price for the ones I sell for them.

Thanks.

Aqualung
Aqualung:
Good luck, I’d say between the Blue Book and the sold auctions on Gunbroker, that should give you a good idea of values. You might also look at the used guns for sale on Cabela’s / Bass Pro shop. They have many used guns for sale online.

Good luck.
 

Biggfoot44

Blackhawk
Joined
Sep 6, 2009
Messages
821
Back at Aqualung , it depends upon how much time & effort you would put in to get absolute maxium $ for buddy's MIL . But here's an acceptable plan , with which your conscience may be clear for doing reasonably good deal .

For pieces you are personally intetested , check completed auctions, online listings , and prices at local gun stores and gun shows , and pay her mid range of going market rate

For the rest , ask around your gun community for which dealer has best reputation for selling on consignment . This may or may not be the same as lowest commission . Somebody who charges 5% more , but succuessfully gets 10% more at sale , and his floor traffic and regular customers who snap them up can be the way to go .

Above presumes that the firearms are reasonably mainstream . Things very rare . or very old require specialized dealers/ collector groups / websites / auctions / etc . Get back to us if the case .
 

Biggfoot44

Blackhawk
Joined
Sep 6, 2009
Messages
821
Blue Book ( & Gun Trader's Guide , etc ) are very helpful to determine What you have , and give a good guide to relative value for different variations , ie finish , bbl length , caliber or gage , etc.

But take them with a shaker of salt as to actual prices . Lag time in writing and publishing , regional variations in popularity and demand .
 

powder smoke

Hawkeye
Joined
Aug 16, 2005
Messages
6,796
Location
Milo Maine
Gun laws vary from state to state, here in Maine private sales of firearms is perfectly legal!
No ffl needed! I have a list I made with the values of each firearm Linda will be able to sell
them how ever she likes. She is not interested in them at all. ps
 

kmoore

Buckeye
Joined
Mar 29, 2017
Messages
1,163
Location
Idaho
I say sell them before you die. You decide what their worth at the time. Use the money for any reason you want. In the end it's just stuff. My Dad, for some reason would never sell a gun, ever. He bought many. He had a list of guns that he wanted to give to family and friends. I got the list and handed those out. That left 57 as I recall to sell. Step mom wanted top dollar and me to sell them. I spend hours and money researching values than calling everyone I knew who might want any. After that I posted them at the PD (work) and other PD's I had friends at. After about 2 months I had about 10-12 left. I went to a gun shop and put them on consignment. About 3 months and they were gone. In the end step mom was disappointed at the prices I got. Dad had told for years how valuable they were. Many were not close to his idea, only in his mind with the memories they had made. I spend many more hours pulling bullets from his handloads and selling all of his reloading gear with bullets, primers, cases and powder. I offered all of it at half of current retail prices. I think I gave my step mom about 2800 bucks from that.
I did it without asking a penny while working 40 hours plus a week. on call every other week and taking care of 2 homes. It was not easy, just saying make it easy for your family, plan ahead. Having a FFL holder deal with that stuff and making some money may not be a bad thing. In my mind having someone else to sell your car, guns house, your really paying them to sell it for you. Is allowing a FFL holder to get 20% of the sale for their time and maybe floor space at their shop a big deal? A car dealer normally gives you about 50% of what they will list your car for sale on their lot.
 

jimbo1096

Hunter
Joined
Jan 10, 2005
Messages
2,055
Location
Alexandria, LA USA
I fortunately have a son that appreciates firearms, is a hunter and involved in outdoor sports as an occupation. I have a will that states he is to have my gun safe and all it's contents, excepting certain jewelry family heirlooms which go to my g-daughter. It's in writing and I assume he will be around after I'm gone. Otherwise there is a "family trust" that takes everything and divides it up equally to my heirs. I've done my part so it's up to them to get it done from there. I'll not be around to see what stupid stuff they do.
 

bisleyfan41

Blackhawk
Joined
Jul 13, 2007
Messages
545
Location
People's Republic of Maryland
I say sell them before you die. You decide what their worth at the time. Use the money for any reason you want. In the end it's just stuff. My Dad, for some reason would never sell a gun, ever. He bought many. He had a list of guns that he wanted to give to family and friends. I got the list and handed those out. That left 57 as I recall to sell. Step mom wanted top dollar and me to sell them. I spend hours and money researching values than calling everyone I knew who might want any. After that I posted them at the PD (work) and other PD's I had friends at. After about 2 months I had about 10-12 left. I went to a gun shop and put them on consignment. About 3 months and they were gone. In the end step mom was disappointed at the prices I got. Dad had told for years how valuable they were. Many were not close to his idea, only in his mind with the memories they had made. I spend many more hours pulling bullets from his handloads and selling all of his reloading gear with bullets, primers, cases and powder. I offered all of it at half of current retail prices. I think I gave my step mom about 2800 bucks from that.
I did it without asking a penny while working 40 hours plus a week. on call every other week and taking care of 2 homes. It was not easy, just saying make it easy for your family, plan ahead. Having a FFL holder deal with that stuff and making some money may not be a bad thing. In my mind having someone else to sell your car, guns house, your really paying them to sell it for you. Is allowing a FFL holder to get 20% of the sale for their time and maybe floor space at their shop a big deal? A car dealer normally gives you about 50% of what they will list your car for sale on their lot.
This. We often think guns are way more valuable than they really are. Or we overestimate the desire of those left behind, to possess our priceless collection. To leave a great deal of work for our loved ones, especially as they're dealing with our loss, is one of the most unloving things we can do.

Nobody can know the exact date of our passing, but if you're moving closer to that zip code, do something about it yourself. Gift the ones you want handed down to the desired recipient BEFORE you croak. Those not wanted by family or friends should be sent down the road BEFORE you die. Leave as small a problem for your family, wife, or executor as possible.
 

lark63

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 25, 2006
Messages
430
Location
Ohio
Not sure about using Gunbroker prices on your spreadsheet as your selling price. - An example of what I see at the OGCA show is buyers and sellers say this is what it goes for on GB so mine is worth that also. GB has a huge audience compared to in person transactions. In reality it is not that way. Yes some stuff I sell on GB because it can bring more than I am offered at the show. I also have a great FFL that can do the transfer/ shipping part.
 
Joined
Nov 15, 2005
Messages
8,997
Location
Greenville, SC: USA
Seems this discussion has planted a seed, at least for me. I've never been into selling my various collection and am still hesitant to start but I can start giving away and I think I will.... some of this will still be a bit of a problem because most of my gun friends are out of state.... but it can be done.
 
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