saving energy

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Joined
Mar 2, 2008
Messages
56
Location
Snow Bird, Florida & Massachusetts
We used to use a cloths line but when we moved into the house we now have the HOA didn't allow them. Not really a big deal as far as energy goes and the cloths come out much nicer from the dryer. I save energy and gas by having an older small car and not driving anywhere.
Take a look at the law in Florida that allows you to have a clothes line, not withstanding any HOA rules. Best regards, David
 

Colonialgirl

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 7, 2008
Messages
7,879
Location
Wesley Chapel, Florida
I wouldn't be able to use a clothes line since I live down a dirt road and the idiots love to raise a dust cloud that OSHA would shut down a factory over if that's where it was at.
 

KIR

Blackhawk
Joined
Mar 2, 2022
Messages
503
My deceased wife bought two wooden clothes racks long before she passed away. Recently I started using them again when my energy bill started skyrocketing. They work both outside when the wind not blowing strong and inside the house too.
 

toysoldier

Hunter
Joined
Aug 23, 2006
Messages
3,332
Location
Hutchinson, KS USA
Thanks Selena,
I thought that was what you were referring to. Back in the old BAC Days (Before Air Conditioning) our family always tried to cook meals during hot days that wouldn't heat up the kitchen/house.

Must be why way back when the kitchen was in a different building than the main house due to heat and fire.

By the way the Log house we lived in while living in Canada still had a wood cook stove in the kitchen. Luckily it also had a small 3 burner propane stove or I would have starved to death. Sometimes the Wifie just like Mason and Dixon draws the line and cooking on a wood stove is one of them.:)
I have a Fisher Baby Bear woodstove with a nice flat top. In the winter, I will occasionally cook a meal on it. Even baked biscuits.
 

Selena

Hunter
Joined
Sep 13, 2013
Messages
2,920
Location
A long way from heaven and far too close to Chicag
Thanks Selena,
I thought that was what you were referring to. Back in the old BAC Days (Before Air Conditioning) our family always tried to cook meals during hot days that wouldn't heat up the kitchen/house.

Must be why way back when the kitchen was in a different building than the main house due to heat and fire.

By the way the Log house we lived in while living in Canada still had a wood cook stove in the kitchen. Luckily it also had a small 3 burner propane stove or I would have starved to death. Sometimes the Wifie just like Mason and Dixon draws the line and cooking on a wood stove is one of them.:)
On occasion Dad will come over and start a fire in the cook stove then have me make coffee on it. I enjoy those times because usually Dad is wanting to talk about when he was very young. I can cook on the wood stove but it's not my favorite thing in the world.
 
Joined
Jan 10, 2005
Messages
2,202
Location
Alexandria, LA USA
I remember pulling clothes off the clothesline with black streaks on them. From not remembering to wipe the plastic coated wire rope off with a damp cloth to get the dirt build-up off before hanging up the clothes.
I also remember Mom using a washer with the hand cranked rollers on top to get the water out before hanging up to dry.
 

Colonialgirl

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 7, 2008
Messages
7,879
Location
Wesley Chapel, Florida
Ah YES !! Wood kitchen cook stoves; My Aunt had a propane range in the kitchen BUT preferred the old wood burner for cooking and keeping a pot of coffee warm; They also had one in the old country home they had and NO propane stove, Uncle had his rocker set near it in the kitchen to stay warm while drinking his tea, it ALSO heated water for dish washing etc.
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2014
Messages
1,842
I like our clothes dryer just fine but almost all of my workout gear is made of materials that don't like dryers. I made up some small stainless steel
fittings and bought some 1/16 inch SS cable and installed them across one end of our laundry room. It's amazing how much drying laundry I can generate, add my wife's gear from 3 or 4 workouts per week and one end of the room is always full. We keep a small Honeywell A100 air filter running in there all the time, because some of the stuff may hang for a day or some before it hits the washer.
Always joked if I was a pro athlete I'd look for a Liquid Tide sponsorship and a laundry assistant.
 

vito

Hunter
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
Messages
2,910
Location
Northern Illinois
My Mom considered the hanginf of clothes on the clothesline, and bringing them in one of her least favorite chores. Towels hard as plywood, clothes sometimes dirty from dirt in the air or birds among other problems. We had an old fashioned washing machine, open at the top, with a mechanical wringer to squeeze out as much water as possible, but she was willing to keep using that old machine in return for my Dad buyer her a dryer. Sure made a difference on a rainy day.

I feel no compulsion to try to save energy. As long as people like Al Gore and John Kerry are living in 20,000 square foot homes, flying private jets around the world, and probably heating and air conditioning several houses besides their primary home, I will keep using my washer, dryer, keeping the a/c as cold as I want (66 at night for good sleeping) and riding my not very fuel efficient SUV. The same people telling me that I should cut back on oil and gas also are against nuclear energy so that's enough to convince me that they really know nothing at all.
 

GLASSMAN

Blackhawk
Joined
Feb 1, 2003
Messages
673
Location
NORTHERN ILLINOIS
When I was just a tadpole, Monday was wash day.
There were 3 runs of dual close-line.
If it was a rainy day the laundry hung in the basement on thier
own lines.
I have one dual line in my backyard and I need to re-string it, although we don't use it often.
Been a while since I looked for any nylon fiber plastic coated line, the stuff you can clean with a damp cloth before you hang.
 

toysoldier

Hunter
Joined
Aug 23, 2006
Messages
3,332
Location
Hutchinson, KS USA
My Mom considered the hanginf of clothes on the clothesline, and bringing them in one of her least favorite chores. Towels hard as plywood, clothes sometimes dirty from dirt in the air or birds among other problems. We had an old fashioned washing machine, open at the top, with a mechanical wringer to squeeze out as much water as possible, but she was willing to keep using that old machine in return for my Dad buyer her a dryer. Sure made a difference on a rainy day.

I feel no compulsion to try to save energy. As long as people like Al Gore and John Kerry are living in 20,000 square foot homes, flying private jets around the world, and probably heating and air conditioning several houses besides their primary home, I will keep using my washer, dryer, keeping the a/c as cold as I want (66 at night for good sleeping) and riding my not very fuel efficient SUV. The same people telling me that I should cut back on oil and gas also are against nuclear energy so that's enough to convince me that they really know nothing at all.
I'm glad you can afford to be so profligate. I live on my Social Security, and saving energy costs is important. Widespread use of clotheslines and other small energy-saving acts would reduce the need for more, expensive energy provisions.
 

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