Safety in the home

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Joined
Oct 20, 2022
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Oregon
I heard the saying once that there are only 2 types of negligent discharges- the ones you are told about and everyone else's that they keep quiet. In essence, most everyone will have one at some time in their lives.

While taking my CHL licensing class, the instructor- an ex-LEO and respected civilian trainer- popped a hole in the wall behind him upon reholstering. He was pretty shook up- mostly embarrassment. He offered a full refund to the whole class so they could take it from someone else. I stood and put forth that of all of his classes, this one probably had the most respect for the possibility of a negligent discharge. The class agreed and we finished.

My ND happened many years prior. I had just unloaded a .22 pistol. Pulled the mag, racked the slide, inserted an empty mag, dropped the slide, and pulled the trigger. Bang. Several of my favorite shirts in the closet now had an extra hole in them. I forgot the important step that Contender mentioned- visually verify an empty chamber. Lesson learned.
 

Pál_K

Guns. I has it.
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Nov 30, 2023
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Gig Harbor, WA, USA
I don't believe "it's going to happen to everyone eventually."

I am certain there are people that have been disciplined enough and safety-conscious enough at all times that in their whole lifetime they've never had a negligent discharge.

They also say there are two types of pilots regarding retractable landing gear ("those who have landed gear-up and those who will"), but I don't believe that either.
 
Joined
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I don't believe "it's going to happen to everyone eventually."

I am certain there are people that have been disciplined enough and safety-conscious enough at all times that in their whole lifetime they've never had a negligent discharge.

They also say there are two types of pilots regarding retractable landing gear ("those who have landed gear-up and those who will"), but I don't believe that either.
I agree- however I'll bet there are a lot that have happened that will never be mentioned.
 

Johnnu2

Hunter
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Jun 26, 2003
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NYS
I know of one old guy who did two "wheels up" landings back in the 60's; they finally yanked his license. He used to sit in his plane in the hangar at night all by himself.

J.
 

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
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Memphis, TN USA
I learned many, many, years ago to check every gun when I first pick it up. Three times I have been handed an "empty" firearm and found when I checked it that it was indeed loaded. One time it was a Reising SMG that had an unusual method of opening the bolt. Fortunately I had read about that many years ago when I was very young.

Bob Wright
 

Bob Wright

Hawkeye
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Jun 24, 2004
Messages
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Memphis, TN USA
I can honestly say I've never had a negligent discharge. I have had one accidental discharge, that with a Thompson Contender. With that pistol, a .35 Remington, the trigger broke as I attempted to fire, but the hammer stayed cocked. After a minute or so, I lowered the pistol to about 45*, keeping the muzzle downrange. Even with my finger off the trigger, the gun ired as it came to about 45*, whipping back and the front sight putting a neat slit in my cheek!

Bob Wright

P.S. The range where we were shooting had maybe five miles downrange, so muzzle upward was a safe condition.
 
Joined
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On the beach and in the hills
I can honestly say I've never had a negligent discharge. I have had one accidental discharge, that with a Thompson Contender. With that pistol, a .35 Remington, the trigger broke as I attempted to fire, but the hammer stayed cocked. After a minute or so, I lowered the pistol to about 45*, keeping the muzzle downrange. Even with my finger off the trigger, the gun ired as it came to about 45*, whipping back and the front sight putting a neat slit in my cheek!

Bob Wright

P.S. The range where we were shooting had maybe five miles downrange, so muzzle upward was a safe condition.
That's neither an accidental or negligent discharge. That's a mechanical failure for which you prepared properly. I once had a Ruger Mark I go full auto. Like yours it was neither accidental or negligent. Mechanical stuff breaks, but safe handling can mitigate any untoward ill effects.
 

freakindawgen

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 30, 2009
Messages
365
Location
Perryville,MO
34 years ago, I took out my Colt CMD .45 dropped the mag and cleared the chamber. For the next hour, while sitting on.my lazy boy watching TV, I took dry fire drills. I cocked the gun with the slide.i would aim across the room at a two place light switch. After the hour, I decided I was done so put the magazine back in the gun. Ten-Fifteen minutes went by and without thinking I racked the slide, aimed at the lite switch, and pulled trigger. Extreme silence. Looked at my wife sitting on the couch and she looked as confused as me. Looked at my gun and noticed it was already cocked. OMG! I cleared the gun, looked up at the light switch, destroyed. Got up to follow the bullet track found sheetrock and door molding all over the bed, and an exit hole on the exterior door. Followed the trajectory it went over the neighbors house and on over the neighborhood. Waited a while for sirens, nothing. Contplated what happened. Neither I nor my wife heard the discharge. Bullet was a 185 G +P and went thru an electric junction box, sheetrock, wood, and an exterior door. To defend my home I would be coming out the same room I shot into and would be shooting at the front door. The wall behind it I have two children sleeping. I rethought my defensive weapon. And I keep all my pistols after that, unloaded!
 

freakindawgen

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 30, 2009
Messages
365
Location
Perryville,MO
???

I don't understand this. Even a suppressed round would be heard.
No idea, maybe an internal safety? Normally you would hear it and then ringing from being enclosed in a room. I did not jump/flinch either. Never noticed the slide operating. Still scratching my head over it.
 

hike

Bearcat
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Oct 15, 2023
Messages
75
Location
Tennessee
I was checking some of my revolvers for the smoothness of the triggers and hammers since I just bought 2 new Rugers to compare. I was making up my gun bag for my shooting tomorrow at the armory. Then I picked out my security 6 and like a stupid dummy pulled the trigger. Yep the 357 went off with a very loud bang. (inside my home in the closet). Luckily, the gun was aimed downwards and the bullet broke the wood cabinet door then imbedded itself into the concrete floor. Although it didn't scare me it really got me thinking - am I too old to have a gun hobby collection?? Should I not have loaded firearms in my safe?? (and elsewhere in the house). Well I did unload all my guns in the safe. I thank God the gun wasn't at a different elevation which could have sent the bullet thru the wall and into my wife or in a neighbors house.
You can do what you want.
My revolvers are stored unloaded and with snap-caps in all cylinders.
My pistols stared unloaded and without a magazine inserted. Some magazines are in a cabinet outside the gun safe & room.
My ammo is stored separately from the firearms in my gun safe & room.
My defensive firearms are stored in the living areas of the house. Loaded and ready to use if necessary.
Safety takes planning so I keep things separate and follow a strict protocol to prevent as many ADs as possible.
 

protoolman

Service-Sixer
Joined
Oct 15, 2001
Messages
2,621
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MN and MT
Never had one, hope I never will. All guns for two generations are unloaded on the porch before entering the house. Rifles have the trigger pulled while closing the bolt so the bolt doesn't stay cocked. Only 1 gun loaded always, my duty gun from years back.
 

NC FNS

Single-Sixer
Joined
Dec 25, 2015
Messages
462
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Western NC
Never had an ND, but did have a squib on one of my reloads. Luckily in a semi-auto. Didn't cycle. Now I always visually inspect for powder before seating the bullets. Not that I wasn't before, but managed to skip that step due to forgetfulness.
 
Joined
Nov 17, 2009
Messages
12,208
Location
Webster, MD.
Loading my Single Six to take care of Mr Groundhog heading for my garage. I cocked the gun after loading the last round and before I could gently lower the hammer I bumped my crazy bone and there is now a hole in the computer room floor. I called myself every kind of idiot for a few minutes. BTW I never got a shot at the groundhog.
 

kbm6893

Single-Sixer
Joined
Aug 3, 2008
Messages
292
Bill Jordan, Marine war veteran, Border Patrolman and participant in many shootouts, and then professional shooter, had a negligent discharge with his Model 19 and killed another officer. Yes, it can happen to ANYBODY. Those who so confidently state it can't happen to them are kidding themselves. Navy SEALS have had them.

March of 1994, I was watching tv and dry firing my Glock 19. When I got bored I put the magazine back in. When I was bored again I picked the gun up, racked the slide, and BANG. Bullet went through the wall into the bathroom and took out the toilet. My father yelled me name from downstairs and came running. I met him at the top of the stairs and told him I was ok. His knees gave out and he sank to the floor, shuddering and weeping. He told me he thought I had taken my own life and I was gone. 30 years later I haven't forgot one detail of that incident. I'm actually glad it happened. No videos or class will be a better teachable moment.
 
Joined
Dec 16, 2005
Messages
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On the beach and in the hills
Then my father kidded himself his entire life. So far so have I. And the only living things he ever shot two or four legged were intentional.

But, your grandparents and great, maybe even great great grandparents paid him to do it. So you can pass judgment on others.

I have no statistics to back my contention, but I suspect more folks have gone through life without a negligent discharge than those that haven't.
 
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