Sad to say, but you see "this" more and more.

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Joined
Apr 5, 2004
Messages
2,791
Location
Granbury, TX. USA
Young punk (pimple faced brats) dressing up as law enforcement officers. Wait! Not just acting, like they are. These idiots really ARE LEOs.

They couldn't make it cashiering at your local Wal-Mart, due to "the stressful environment and annoying customers" being "too much to handle" so they go to police academy and get a job being a COP of all things???

I majored in IT and computer sciences, with a minor in criminal justice, it's scarry how little these self proclaimed experts know about the law! But it's very easy for them to violate it (your rights) due to lack of knowledge of their self proclaimed experience on the subject.

I've seen more stupid yugo happen in the last SIX months, perpetuated by Wal-Mart drop out cops, than in the last ten years.

I support the police, I'm not anti-law enforcement, but I'm scared to death of what I see it turning into. I have a dash cam now when I drive and record EVERY interaction with the police, weather it's involving me, or somebody else, yes I take time out of my busy day and busy schedule for this, it's sad when we have to.
 

gtxmonte

Buckeye
Joined
Feb 1, 2014
Messages
1,073
Location
Alabama
Not THEIR fault..............seems to me if they go through the academy, they should know what they are doing and properly trained. You likely don't have a problem with these type types going into the military and defending your country.
 
Joined
Nov 15, 2005
Messages
9,154
Location
Greenville, SC: USA
First time I realized I was getting old was a goodly number of years ago, young woman was living with us (18) and she had a Friday night date and I decided I needed to go meet the 'boy'. He as a Highway Patrolman.......about 20.
 

vito

Hunter
Joined
Jan 2, 2005
Messages
2,910
Location
Northern Illinois
One of my sons went through the Police Academy at a major midwestern city followed by a few years as a street cop in that city (he now works in a different aspect of law enforcement). After he graduated from the police academy he often remarked about how little they actually teach someone that is relevant to their work as a police officer. He said you really only learn from being on the street, hopefully with more experienced officers. Even then, he said, there was no standardization of how things were done, and it was a good way to get picked on by fellow officers if you had to ask about specific procedures. As an example, he said there were minor paperwork differences for different arrests for different crimes. He had a friend who had been on the force for about 10 years and had admitted that he never arrested anyone for the specific crime of auto theft since he could not remember the paperwork process needed for that crime and refused to ask anyone for fear of ridicule. So when he caught a perp who had stolen a car he let the guy go with a verbal warning not to do it again and just reported the vehicle as "found".
 

bogus bill

Hunter
Joined
Dec 25, 2009
Messages
3,969
Location
utah
Hard to believe in this day and age but it`s not that long ago some small towns would hire off the street with NO academy involved. It happened to me back in 1964. In that case I didn't go to work there as I got a promotion when I called my supervisor intending to quit, but I could have. All those kids do grow up. I once was convinced a person shouldn't qualify to be a cop until they were 40 years old, but that wouldn't work well.
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2004
Messages
2,791
Location
Granbury, TX. USA
bogus bill said:
Hard to believe in this day and age but it`s not that long ago some small towns would hire off the street with NO academy involved. It happened to me back in 1964. In that case I didn't go to work there as I got a promotion when I called my supervisor intending to quit, but I could have. All those kids do grow up. I once was convinced a person shouldn't qualify to be a cop until they were 40 years old, but that wouldn't work well.

I'm less concerned about the age restriction. But I'm still convinced an individual should posess at least a 2 year Associate's Degree in Criminal Justice as a pre-requisite to police academy. This would not be optional.

Then the revolving door of low accountability mentality and justification for things that go on behind those closed doors that would make you sick, would fade away.
 

RugerHound

Hunter
Joined
Jan 9, 2012
Messages
2,289
Location
Casa Grande, Arizona
Back 8 or 9 years ago, my step daughter was going out with a Deputy... The guy was a @)*!$!)*@# idiot. I mean MAJOR LEAGUE idiot. They went out riding in his Jeep with our grand daughter (who was about 2) and tried to drive through a running wash.

Needless to say it didn't end well...

Mrs. Rugerhound & I ended up driving over to Florence to pick them up after the Jeep was washed 15 miles downstream... Needless to say I didn't have much good to say to Mr. Deputy Dawg after risking the lives of my stepdaughter and her child. The SOB is lucky I didn't shoot him for such a bone headed stunt. (This was before we had "Constitutional carry", but I carried anyway)
 

Rancher Will

Blackhawk
Joined
Oct 10, 2010
Messages
748
Location
North Colorado
Colorado had no Law Enforcement Academy, before and for almost two decades after I was hired as Undersheriff of a Western Colorado County. In the Early 1960's political leaders in Western Colorado formed a group named "Club 20", sponsored by Press Walker, publisher of the Grand Junction Sentinel Newspaper and owner of TV Networks.

Town Councilmen, County Commissioners, Police Chiefs, Sheriffs, and key businessmen from the 20 West Colorado Counties met one weekend each month in various cities each month on three day weekends, to discuss and plan area political management procedures to counter the political, (Democrat) political power of the growing Denver area contrasting the "West Slope" needs and requirements. As Undesheriff I attended those meetings all of those years.

Early on, a few of us veteran LEOs proposed that we schedule a training session each weekend, one day, usually on the Sunday, for any new LEOs that any department wished to send for police training. Some of us volunteered to be instructors in areas of our expertise. I was one of the first instructors, along with the Mesa County Undersheriff, our two area FBI agents, Cliff Browning and Dave Yates, and a Denver Police Sgt who volunteered to come to our meetings..

We also obtained other volunteer instructors from other agencies from time to time for their specialty,, Denver Police Dept, FBI Agents, a Secret Service Agent, a Law Professor, a Pathologist, two District Attorneys, etc.

Our program was very successful and I believe we were able to improve the quality of Law Enforcement in Western Colorado those years. Finally our State Legislature enabled a Law Enforcement Academy to be formed, starting in Golden, Colorado. This ended the training programs that we had been using in Western Colorado.

I believe that the Academy was needed and believe that it improved on our previous volunteer program. But I also believe that each had advantages and problems that will always be cause for improvement.
 

Mobuck

Hawkeye
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
7,538
Location
missouri
"So, there aren't enough folks leaving military service to fill the ranks of law enforcement?"

Why do people think military service is a preliminary step to law enforcement??????
Very few similarities and many instances of training or experience that is counter to the duties of law enforcement.
 

bogus bill

Hunter
Joined
Dec 25, 2009
Messages
3,969
Location
utah
Mobuck, I cant be called a expert but I agree. My job was working with mostly retired LEO from just about every type agency and retired Military. When I first hired in it almost seemed to be a requirement. I was one of the first that our old chief hired that wasn't. That was in 1965 and everything changed fast after I hired in. When I hired in we didn't have one female on our roughly 250 person dept but later I estimate maybe 30 % or so were female.
To get back to the differences, Once a employee complained to me about a guy I was working with. He said "he treats us like we are a bunch of prisoners". Cracked me up as my partner had just retired as a federal prison guard and we had hired in the same day. I could see the difference`s and similarity`s of how a retired military guard handled people as opposed to the retired cops, and also the differences between retired big city cops as opposed to smaller department retiree`s. Usually the retired military seemed to be more nit pickers as to the rules we had and retired LEO were more laid back.
 
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